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  • 1.
    Lundmark, Martin
    et al.
    FOI.
    Giovachini, Laurent
    DGA, Frankrike.
    The development of the French defence industry in the 20th century2005Report (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Nilsson, Mikael
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, The Military History Division.
    Limiting Diplomatic Friction: Sweden, the United States and SKF's ball bearing exports to Eastern Europe, 1950-522009In: Scandinavian Economic History Review, ISSN 0358-5522, E-ISSN 1750-2837, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 273-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the U.S. government’s efforts to curb the Swedish ball bearing producer SKF’s exports to the East early in the Cold War, 1950-1952, and interprets this process within the framework of hegemony theory. The period up to mid-1951 saw increasing U.S. pressure upon Sweden and SKF to consent to U.S. hegemony by abiding by the CoCom embargo. To achieve its objectives U.S. policymakers developed a flexible ‘’carrot and stick’’ approach, and the article adds considerable detail regarding the U.S. government’s handling of SKF. U.S. tolerance and flexibility was dependent upon Swedish consent to American hegemony in Western Europe, which was received through the signing of the Stockholm agreement in mid-June 1951, a hegemonic apparatus through which Sweden’s abidance by the embargo was handled. A small amount of exports was accepted by Washington as long as the main U.S. objective, to deny the Eastern Bloc strategic technology, was adhered to by SKF. The article also reveals the lack of policy coordination in the Swedish government, and the conflicts between the government and SKF regarding the responsibility for adhering to the embargo.

  • 3.
    Nilsson, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH.
    Stenlås, Niklas
    KTH.
    ColdWar Neutrality and Technological Dependence: Swedens's Military Technology and the East-West Trade2005In: East-West Trade and the Cold War / [ed] Jari Eloranta and Jari Ojala, Jyväskylä: University of Jyväskylä , 2005, p. 133-151Chapter in book (Other academic)
1 - 3 of 3
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