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  • 1.
    Brandow, Carina
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Ledarskapscentrum.
    Hyllengren, Peder
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Ledarskapscentrum.
    Johansson, Eva
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Ledarskapscentrum.
    Gustafson, Michael
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    Larsson, Gerry
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Ledarskapscentrum.
    Irreguljär krigföring: Ledarskapsutmaningar vid olika taktiktyper2014Report (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Dorn, Michael
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    Lindström, Michael
    Boström, Fredrik
    Pelo, Johan
    Eklöf, Martin
    Hagström, Anders
    Logistik 2015-2020: En framtidsstudie om logistiksimulering: FoT 19 logistik2006Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    In this study an attempt is made to put forward ideas about how logistic support to the Armed Forces of the future will be dealt with, based on a sur­vey of current social, military and economic trends. The aim is to identify those logistic matters, which it would be relevant to simulate within a 10 to 15-year period. The study has been carried out with the aid of NATO logis­tic doctrine and a qualitative method, which is closely comparable to idea analysis.

    One of the findings of the study is that the Swedish Armed Forces could be one module, amongst many (e.g. police, rescue services and aid organisa­tions), tailor-made for a particular peace support operation, led by a national HQ. It can also be taken that civilian actors, to a much greater extent than today, will be part of the logistics system and that this system could resem­ble the “IKEA model”, i.e. small stores of equipment that can quickly be put together to meet different needs. All this will require a greater degree of specialisation and coordination, both in Sweden and in other countries.

    Those logistic matters identified as being relevant for simulation within a 10 to15-year period have been brought together in a summary. The main con­clusion of the study indicates that it is of the utmost importance to simulate a model of the complete logistic chain. In the meantime, in order to carry out the simulation, the collection of experiences and lessons learned must be systemised and recorded. If this does not happen, it is doubtful that the simulation can be used as a system to support decision-making.

  • 3.
    Dorn, Michael
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    Moradi, Farsad
    Lilja, Göran
    Logistikledning: En studie om effektivisering av försörjningskedjan: FoT-område Logistik2009Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish Armed Forces (SAF) are today in a process of transformation, with the focus changing from homeland defence to embracing a global perspective. This change is being driven by a trend towards increasing international commitments. This has created a new set of demands on SAF, which has put pressure on greater efficiency in the supply chain, not least the order fulfilment process (OFP). Today, material managers can have a significant impact on lead-time reduction, but it is often unclear as to which aspects of the process managers should focus their efforts and capital on, to bring about improvements in the supply chain and the order fulfilment process. To increase knowledge of this phenomenon, the purpose of this thesis has been to investigate factors that have an impact on efficiency when it comes to the military supply chain (order fulfilment process for Role 2) in relation to ongoing changes within the SAF.

    The project is based on a case study of the medical capability (Role 2). Moreover, a model has been used, which illustrates different influential factors of a changing organisation. These are core business, strategies, competence and management culture, all of which lead to a better understanding of how the unique context might have an impact on the efficiency related to the supply chain.

    The results of the analysis show that there are great similarities between the empirical and theoretical elements. Several actors in the process are well aware of what needs to be done to improve the OFP; hence, there are some implications worthy of emphasis. However, the results also indicate that the use of measurements is not considered as a key principle for the management of processes by the respondents. Nevertheless, by using measurements in the OFP, SAF could better define the actual order cycle time and indirectly improve the OFP. An overall strategy has not been identified; however there are strategic goals and a material strategy. Furthermore, it is important that many of the respondents are not aware of what is said in these documents and that it appears to be unclear how the strategy should be applied in their daily work.

    With regard to the leadership culture, there appears to be a strong "bottoms-up spirit" and a weak "top down" leadership in SAF. The study indicates that efficiency in the supply chain would benefit from a better balance between top down and bottom up leadership. The main conclusion from the analysis is that competence seems to be the essential factor in increasing efficiency in the OFP, to meet the demand for the development of new military capabilities, such as the NBG. It is almost as if this factor has been forgotten or is being neglected by SAF.

  • 4.
    Erdeniz, Robert
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    Approaches to Operational Art Revisited: Theoretical and Practical Implications of Methodology2016In: 21st International Command and Control Reserach and Technology Symposium (ICCRTS): C2 in a Complex Connected Battlespace, International Command and Control Institute , 2016, Vol. Topic 5, p. 1-32, article id 47Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    U.S. doctrines have introduced a third approach within Operational Art, called the design approach, which has evoked military professional and academic debate as well as influenced NATO doctrines. Allied Joint Doctrine for Operational-level Planning (AJP 5) states that a Force Commander should choose one out of three approaches when conducting Operational Art and conducting operational planning: a traditional (causalist), a systemic or a design approach. The difference between the causalist- and the systemic- approach concerns the clash between reductionism and holism, but the difference between the design- and the systemic- approach is methodologically vague. Hence the following question concerning methodology and Operational Art arises:

    What methodological implications could constitute an argument for choosing the design approach when conducting Operational Art within a battlespace?

    Neither NATO doctrine, planning framework nor previous research offer any explicit methodological argument for choosing, or preferring, the design- over the systemic- approach. This article concludes that one possible argument for preferring a design approach is adherence to value-focused thinking, but this requires that the Force Commander can and is willing to focus on stakeholders’ values within the battlespace. This conclusion is implied by two methodological implications identified and discussed in this article. If the design approach is to be a relevant option, then further conceptual development, experimentation and education is required. To conclude, NATO should review the description of their approaches within Operational Art since the argument for preferring one approach over another is lacking and this could hamper the Force Commander’s management of the battlespace.

  • 5.
    Erdeniz, Robert
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    Operations planning revisited: theoretical and practical implications of methodology2016In: Defence Studies, ISSN 1470-2436, E-ISSN 1743-9698, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 248-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parts of NATO’s contemporary planning framework called the comprehensive operations planning directive (COPD), and parts of the operation-level planning process should be revised since they suffer from methodological inconsistency. This claim is defended by discussing contradicting methodological properties and heuristics applied when framing and managing a military problem in accordance with the COPD. The methodological inconsistency within the COPD; in other words, simultaneously applying contradictory methodological properties, implies one theoretical and three practical implications. The theoretical implication is summarised in a meta-theoretical framework and explained by discussing five methodological properties: non-linearity, emergence, independently changeable generalisations, invariance and boundaries. The three practical implications of methodology imply that methodology is guiding: the problem-frame, conceptual development and action. To improve military planners’ understanding and management of these four identified implications, NATO is recommended to develop a “handbook of methodology.” The purpose of such a handbook should be to emphasise the utility of methodology when planning military operations

  • 6.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst). Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    The intelligence discourse: the Swedish military intelligence (MUST) as a producer of knowledge2013Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish Military Intelligence and Security Directorate (MUST) is a producer of knowledge, a knowledge that is fundamental for decisionmaking in foreign and security policy. The intelligence knowledge production is often held as objective, value neutral, and with the intention of ‘speaking truth onto power’. However, this study holds that such a perspective on intelligence knowledge production calls for a revision. Hence, the overall purpose of this study is to examine the characteristics of knowledge in intelligence analysis and also to investigate how that knowledge is affected by the social context of its production, the military intelligence service. The source material is of three kinds; first texts and documents, second interviews with intelligence analysts and managers, and third observations of seminars and meetings during the production process of estimates.

    The results are that there is a strong presence of an implicit interpretive framework that continuously influences and guides the knowledge production and thereby makes the knowledge dependent on one specific perspective contrary to the intentional objectivity within the intelligence service. Further, the study reveals that the social and discursive practices for intelligence knowledge production include a ‘logic of appropriateness’ suggesting the presence of a structured Denkkollektiv with a structuredDenkstil. The actions and choices of the individuals are transformed to create conformity to the norms within the social discursive practices. Thus, the inherited frame of interpretation, as well as the socialised norm of staying within the existing accepted frames ofthinking and acting ends up to the stability and duration of the not always accurate and fruitful Denkstil.

    At the core of political science resides the question of how policy is shaped. Even though this study has focused merely on one organisation in a specific policy field in one country it brings insights to the knowledge and policy nexus.

  • 7.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola.
    During, Carl
    Kungliga tekniska högskolan.
    Holmlund, Joakim
    Södertörns högskola.
    Rönnby, Johan
    Södertörns högskola.
    Sjöblom, Ingvar
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    Ågren, Michael
    Resande mannen (1660): Marinarkeologisk rapport 20122013Report (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Flygelholm, Stefan
    et al.
    Försvarsmakten.
    Norlander, Arne
    Försvarsmakten.
    Hansson, Lars-Åke
    Totalförsvarets forskningsinstitut, FOI.
    Sjöblom, Ingvar
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    Genomförande av expeditionära operationer: Tillämpat koncept 2012-06-212012Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Gustafson, Michael
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    Hybridkrigföring: nya utmaningar eller klassiska principer som vi redan förstår?2016In: Kungl Krigsvetenskapsakademiens Handlingar och Tidskrift, ISSN 0023-5369, no 3, p. 161-170Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Gustafson, Michael
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    I Frank Kitsons fotspår2010In: Kungl Krigsvetenskapsakademiens Handlingar och Tidskrift, ISSN 0023-5369, no 2, p. 64-91Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Gustafson, Michael
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    Irregular Warfare and Counterinsurgency2008In: Kungl Krigsvetenskapsakademiens Handlingar och Tidskrift, ISSN 0023-5369, no 5, p. 56-65Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Gustafson, Michael
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    Modern Irregular Warfare and Counterinsurgency2009In: Kungl Krigsvetenskapsakademiens Handlingar och Tidskrift, ISSN 0023-5369, no 1, p. 82-101Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Gustafson, Michael
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    Perspectives on War Studies and Irregular Warfare2009In: Kungl Krigsvetenskapsakademiens Handlingar och Tidskrift, ISSN 0023-5369, no 2, p. 102-118Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Gustafson, Michael
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst). National Defence University, Department of Tactics and Operational Art, Finland.
    The Duality of Tactical Thought: A Study of how Swedish Land Forces’ Commanders view Tactics in Irregular Warfare2014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a sociological study of the views of officers in the Swedish Army and its Amphibious Forces on tactics in Irregular Warfare (IW), in particular, Counterinsurgency (COIN). IW comprises struggles, where the military weaker part uses an indirect approach with smaller units and integrates the civilian and military dimensions in a violence spectrum including subversion, terrorism, Guerrilla Warfare and infantry actions. IW is the main armed warfare style in insurgencies. COIN is the combined political, military, economic, social and legal actions in counter insurgencies.

    Data has been collected by means of interviews with almost all (n =43) officers, who were either commanding battalions or rifle and manoeuvre companies while undergoing training for general warfare and international operations. The main theoretical and methodological inspiration is the traditional one for research on social fields, inaugurated by the French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu. The statistical technique used is Multiple Correspondence Analysis. As a background and context base, an inquiry inspired by the Begriffsgechichte (Conceptual History) tradition explores the genesis and development of understandings of the term Irregular Warfare. The research question is outlined as; “how can contemporary Swedish military thought on tactics in Irregular Warfare be characterized using descriptive patterns, mapped in relation to background factors and normative standards?

    The most significant findings are that there are two main opposing notions separating the officers’ views on tactics in Irregular Warfare: (1) a focus on larger, combat oriented and collectively operating military units versus smaller and larger, more intelligence oriented and dispersed operating units, and (2) a focus on military tasks and kinetic effects versus military and civilian tasks as well as “soft” effects. The distribution of these views can be presented as a two-dimensional space structured by the two axes. This space represents four categories of tactics, partly diverging from normative military standards for Counterinsurgency. This social space of standpoints shows different structural tendencies for background factors of social and cultural character, particularly dominant concerning military backgrounds, international mission experiences and civilian education. Compared to military standards for Counterinsurgency, the two tactical types characterized by a Regular Warfare mind-set stands out as counter-normative.

    Signs of creative thought on military practice and theory, as well as a still persistent Regular Warfare doxa are apparent. Power struggles might thus develop, effecting the transformation to a broadened warfare culture with an enhanced focus also on Irregular Warfare. The result does not support research results arguing for a convergence of military thought in the European transformation of Armed Forces. The main argument goes beyond tactics and suggests sociological analysis on reciprocal effects regarding strategy, operational art, tactics as well as leadership, concerning the mind-set and preferences for Regular, Irregular and Hybrid Warfare.

  • 15.
    Holmberg, Martin
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Mattsson, Peter
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    Rethinking the use of C2 methods for small states facing an adversary with superior resources2015In: International Society of Military Sciences 2015 (ISMS 2015), 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Lundqvist, Stefan
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst). Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, Tactical Warfare Division, Maritime Operations Section.
    Uppföljning och utvärdering av operationer2018In: Militära arbetsmetoder: En lärobok i krigsvetenskap / [ed] Peter Thunholm; Jerker Widén; Niklas Wikström, Malmö: Universus Academic Press , 2018, p. 163-192Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Uppföljning och utvärdering av militära operationer utgör ett sammanhängande system som spänner över alla ledningsnivåer. Behovet av detta system har sitt ursprung i de ökade krav på spårbarhet och mätbarhet av resultat och progression vid genomförandet av militära operationer som ställs i Sverige, EU och Nato. Identifieringen av de parametrar som skall mätas med därför avsedda verktyg under den militära operationens genomförande är en process som tar sin början i de högre ledningsnivåerna, det givna uppdraget, samt operationens slutmål. Genomförandet är däremot en process som föds från de förband som är insatta i operationen, vars insamlade information samman­ställs enligt förberedda riktlinjer, aggregeras och tillvaratas på de olika militära ledningsnivåerna. Denna text beskriver inte bara uppbyggnaden av Sveriges och Natos system för uppföljnings- och utvärdering av militära operationer, samt introducerar de analysverktyg som används på olika ledningsnivåer för att mäta framdrivning och framsteg, den diskuterar även de utmaningar som är förknippade med att implementera en effektiv uppföljnings- och utvärderingsprocess.

  • 17.
    Mattsson, Peter A
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    Det italienska fälttåget 1943-452009In: Tankar om fälttåg / [ed] Peter Ahlström & Ulf Högström, Stockholm: Försvarshögskolan , 2009, p. 21-45Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Molander, Pia
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    Intelligence, Diplomacy and the Swedish Dilemma: The Special Operations Executive in Neutral Sweden 1939-452007In: Intelligence and national security, ISSN 0268-4527, E-ISSN 1743-9019, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 722-744Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article will survey the activities of Special Operations Executive (SOE) in Sweden during the course of the Second World War. Under the constraints of a foreign policy that sought to gradually encourage the government of Sweden to become more pro-allied rather than pro-axis and ‘non-belligerent’, SOE nonetheless entered Sweden with hopes of developing a series of contacts with groups and individuals that could be turned into active resistance if Sweden joined the axis, or if Nazi Germany either invaded or occupied Sweden and the whole of Scandinavia. Once the possibility of an axis invasion of Sweden was decisively dismissed, SOE had to find a different role. In Sweden, the successful development of SOE's intelligence gathering capabilities in the economic sphere, especially in the allied campaign against German iron-ore traffic and ball-bearings, provided the organization with a purpose that definitely took another course when compared to intelligence activities in other regions and countries. With these constraints in view, this article focuses on three major aspects of SOE involvement in Sweden. First, the article will examine SOE's role, and war aims in Sweden, linking these to the very different requirements of the Foreign Office. Second, the article will explore British and Swedish intelligence relations. Third, it will consider the Swedish security police response to British intelligence.

  • 19.
    Palmgren, Anders
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    Center of Gravity och Schwerpunkt: problemet att tänka strategi mellan teori och praktik2010In: Kungl Krigsvetenskapsakademiens Handlingar och Tidskrift, ISSN 0023-5369, no 3, p. 29-42Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Palmgren, Anders
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    Clausewitz's Interweaving of Krieg and Politik2011In: Clausewitz: The State and War / [ed] Andreas Herberg-Rothe, Jan Willem Honig, and Daniel Moran, Stuttgart: Franz Steiner Verlag, 2011, p. 49-69Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Palmgren, Anders
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    On Interpretation: Clausewitz in German strategic thought from “Sedan” towards “Verdun”2011In: British International Studies Association, Manchester 27-29 April 2011, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Palmgren, Anders
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst). National Defence University, Finland.
    Visions of Strategy: Following Clausewitz's Train of Thought2014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Palmgren, Anders
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    Wikström, Niklas
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division.
    Auftragstaktik och uppdragstaktik2016In: Uppdragstaktik på svenska: en vän- och debattbok tillägnad överste Jan Mörtberg, Kungl. Krigsvetenskapsakademien och Försvarshögskolan , 2016, p. 35-66Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Pappila, Ove
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    Command and Control2009In: Kungl Krigsvetenskapsakademiens Handlingar och Tidskrift, ISSN 0023-5369, no 2, p. 145-148Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Pappila, Ove
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    Rommel and the 7th Panzer Division in France 19402009In: Kungl Krigsvetenskapsakademiens Handlingar och Tidskrift, ISSN 0023-5369, no 2, p. 73-101Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Pappila, Ove
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    The birth of operational art2014In: Baltic Security & Defence Review, ISSN 1736-3772, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 113-144Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Pappila, Ove
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    The Nature of War today2008In: Kungl Krigsvetenskapsakademiens Handlingar och Tidskrift, ISSN 0023-5369, no 4, p. 69-73Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Pappila, Ove
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    Cedergren, Anders
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för luftoperationer (KV Luft).
    Tid, rum rörlighet och position2009In: Tankar om fälttåg: en bok om fälttåg och den gemensamma stridens komplexitet / [ed] Peter Ahlström och Ulf Högström, Stockholm: Försvarshögskolan , 2009, p. 163-185Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Sjöblom, Ingvar
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    Analys av dokumenterad kanon: identifiering av vraket2012In: Skeppet Mars (1564): Fältrapport etapp 1 2011. Inledande skeppsdokumentation, identifiering av kanon, observerade föremål och avgärnsning av vrakplatsen / [ed] Rönnby, Johan, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola , 2012, p. 18-20Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Sjöblom, Ingvar
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    Dokumentation av eldrör och lavetter2013In: Skeppet Mars (1564): Marinarkeologisk fältrapport etapp II 2012 / [ed] Johan Rönnby, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola , 2013, p. 26-34Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Sjöblom, Ingvar
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    Om konsten att identifiera vrak2013In: Marinarkeologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1100-9632, no 2Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 32.
    Sjöblom, Ingvar
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst). Historiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet.
    Svenska sjöofficerare under 1500-talet2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    What was the expertise of a naval officer during the 16th century? How did the naval officers’ expand, and what was the power relations like? These questions asked initially in the dissertation, try to capture the essence of the actual purpose, namely to investigate the development, power relations and the competence of a naval officer in the Swedish Navy during the 16th century (1522-1595).

    There was a correlated relationship between the military strategic choice of the operational area, naval tactical choices vessel types for customized naval warfare and the need for naval officers. A naval officer was a person who was delegated the state power to lead all fleets or individual warships. The fleet was considered as a significant State organization. Periodically, it belonged to one of the most expensive items of expenditure, which each year would be maintained. Naval officers were only added to command if the ship was on a military missions. They were responsible for combat, maintaining lines of communication, carrying out trade war, transporting supplies, patrolling and customs duty. War regulated if the Navy was properly equipped and manned.

    Naval expertise was clearly evident in the Admiral instructions during the Northern Seven Years War. The instructions included military strategy, tactics and actions during sea combat. The court material shows that the naval officer should fight (bravely) and not dishonorably.  A Naval officer should be loyal in terms of reliability, but also to exercise authority, implement and lead naval operations, and artillery and sea combat. He should also ensure that the supplies were distributed in a proper manner and that the Christian sermon should be conducted in accordance with current standards. The naval officer could even be responsible for recruitment, payroll and other administrative activities.

    Overall, this meant that the naval officer would be responsible for money, safety, discipline and legal issues, and be prepared to exercise the power of state force against the enemy. However, he did not need to navigate or set sail; it was instead the specialists further down the hierarchy chain who were responsible for navigation. In many ways, it was all about supply and demand when a naval officer was to be appointed. And this mirrored social hierarchy in general.

  • 33.
    Sjöblom, Ingvar
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    The Guns of Mars the Magnificent: Cannon Helps Provide Proof of a Wreck's Identity2014In: Quest. Journal of Global Underwater Explorers, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 33-36Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Sjöblom, Ingvar
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    Müller, Leos
    Stockholms universitet.
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    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, The Military History Division.
    Sjökrig och örlogsflottan2016In: Sjövägen till Sverige: från 1500-talet till våra dagar / [ed] Simon Ekström, Leos Müller, Tomas Nilson, Malmö: Universus Academic Press , 2016, p. 22-68Chapter in book (Other academic)
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    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    Hyllengren, Peder
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Ledarskapscentrum.
    Brandow, Carina
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Ledarskapscentrum.
    Psychological Operations: What Makes them Work?2015Conference paper (Refereed)
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