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  • 301.
    Wagnsson, Charlotte
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section, Sektionen för säkerhetespolitik och strategi.
    What is at stake in the information sphere?: Anxieties about malign information influence among ordinary Swedes2020In: European Security, ISSN 0966-2839, E-ISSN 1746-1545, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 397-415, article id 10.1080/09662839.2020.1771695Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scholars, states and organisations have warned that authoritarian regimes and other hostile actors are projecting information to inflict harm upon others. Yet, there is little agreement on the nature of this threat. This is mirrored in the plethora of labels in use, ranging from “disinformation” to “sharp power” and “information warfare”. In order to investigate this menace further, we turn our focus to ordinary people’s anxieties, since a better understanding of threat perceptions will also provide a better understanding of the problem. We conducted a comprehensive case study comprising focus group discussions (n: 97) and an extensive survey (n: 2046) among Swedish citizens. We asked: To what extent do people worry about information influence and why? What can this tell us about the nature of this problem or threat? The empirical results suggest that respondents were first and foremost worried about societal cohesion and democracy. They also identified a risk that information influence can undermine trust in societal institutions and the EU. Based on our findings, we suggest that “malign information influence” is an appropriate label to be used in future research. Finally, we propose directions for future systematic research on how malign information infuence is received and processed in different national contexts.

  • 302.
    Wagnsson, Charlotte
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section, Sektionen för säkerhetespolitik och strategi.
    Barzanje, Costan
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section, Sektionen för krishantering och internationell samverkan.
    A framework for analysing antagonistic narrative strategies: A Russian tale of Swedish decline2021In: Media, War & Conflict, ISSN 1750-6352, E-ISSN 1750-6360, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 239-257, article id https://doi.org/10.1177/1750635219884343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New information technologies and media consumption patterns have enabled aggressive practices that are qualitatively different from old-style propaganda. Actors no longer rely on secrecy, but can openly make use of social media and media outlets in foreign languages to destabilize other states and societies from within. Strategic narratives have become a key means in this endeavour. To expose the discursive (harmful) capacity of strategic narratives, the article suggests detailed analysis based on a narrative ontology. The analytical framework is applied in an exploratory case study of the Russian state-sponsored broadcasting company Sputnik’s strategic narrative about Sweden from 2014 to 2018. In addition to unmasking Sputnik’s strategic narrative, the article fills a gap in previous research in particular by exposing three antagonistic narrative strategies labelled ‘suppression’, ‘destruction’ and ‘direction’. These strategies reflect general driving forces in the security sphere and can inspire and structure future research into antagonistic strategic narration.

  • 303.
    Wagnsson, Charlotte
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section.
    Hallenberg, Jan
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section.
    Conclusion: farewell Westphalia?: the prospects of EU security governance2009In: European Security Governance: the European Union in a Westphalian World / [ed] Charlotte Wagnsson, James A. Sperling, Jan Hallenberg, Routledge, 2009, p. 127-140Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 304.
    Wagnsson, Charlotte
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section, Sektionen för säkerhetespolitik och strategi.
    Hellman, Maria
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section, Sektionen för säkerhetespolitik och strategi.
    Normative Power Europe Caving In?: EU under Pressure of Russian Information Warfare2018In: Journal of Common Market Studies, ISSN 0021-9886, E-ISSN 1468-5965, Vol. 56, no 5, p. 1161-1177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scholars have characterized the EU as a normative power whose greatest asset is to be able to shape conceptions of what is ‘normal’ in international affairs. Scholars have argued that a normative power has to meet certain discursive standards; representing others in a non‐antagonistic, humble way. We question whether the EU can live up to this ideal when defending itself against Russian strategic communication. The empirical enquiry establishes that while the EU High Commissioner communicates in line with the stipulated standards, the newly established East Stratcom Taskforce and its publication ‘Disinformation Digest’ diverges from this ideal. The establishment of the Taskforce has led to the EU losing reflexivity and normative power. The article concludes that while Diez’ and Manners’ standards are utopian in the contemporary communicative climate, they remain useful as guiding rules that can help normative powers ‘watch their language’ and avoid doing unnecessary harm.

  • 305.
    Wagnsson, Charlotte
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section.
    Holmberg, Arita
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section.
    Conflict Management2014In: Handbook of Governance and Security / [ed] James Sperling, Northampton: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014, p. 324-342Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 306.
    Wagnsson, Charlotte
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security and Strategic Studies (ISS), Political Science Section.
    Holmberg, Arita
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security and Strategic Studies (ISS), Political Science Section.
    Hellman, Maria
    Stockholms Universitet, Institutionen för Journalistik, Medier och Kommunikation.
    The Centrality of Non-traditional Groups for Security in the Globalized Era: The Case of Children2010In: International Political Sociology, ISSN 1749-5679, E-ISSN 1749-5687, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The globalized security situation characterized by transnational threats and international interventionism in ‘‘new wars,’’ connect non traditional local actors and traditional global actors to one another in unprecedented ways. We argue that children in particular need to be highlighted because they are highly pertinent to the globalized security situation, yet they make up one of the few agents that have remained non-politicized in the eyes of the scholarly community. The article suggests a framework of analysis that can generate analyses on security of traditional as well as non-traditional agents. Placing non-traditional groups in the center of attention serves to mirror the complexities of the current security situation better.

  • 307.
    Wagnsson, Charlotte
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section, Sektionen för säkerhetespolitik och strategi.
    Olsson, Eva-Karin
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section, Sektionen för krishantering och internationell samverkan.
    Nilsen, Isabella
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section, Sektionen för säkerhetespolitik och strategi.
    Gendered Views in a Feminist State: Swedish Opinions on Crime, Terrorism,and National Security2020In: Gender & Society, ISSN 0891-2432, E-ISSN 1552-3977, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 790-817Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gender differences have been observed regarding many political and social issues, yet welack comprehensive evidence on differences in perceptions on a wide range of securityissues increasingly important to voters: military threats, criminality, and terrorism.Previous research suggests that when women are highly politically mobilized, as they arein Sweden, gender differences in political opinion are large. On the other hand, Swedishpoliticians have worked hard to reduce gender stereotypical thinking. This prompts thequestion: Are there gender differences in attitudes on security issues in Sweden, and if so,in what ways do the attitudes differ? This study is based on comprehensive data from focusgroups and a large-scale survey. The results show that women were more prone to respondwith an “ethic of care,” across security issues. Women were more inclined to understandsecurity problems as structural, explained by macho culture, segregation, and injustice.Women tend to support preventive measures that provide individuals with opportunities tochoose “the right path,” such as education and economic investment in deprived areas.When asked about national security, women believe more in diplomacy and dialogue. Ingeneral, women are less inclined to support various repressive solutions.

  • 308.
    Wagnsson, Charlotte
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security and Strategic Studies (ISS), Political Science Section.
    Sperling, JamesUniversity of Akron, Ohio, USA.Hallenberg, JanSwedish National Defence College, Department of Security and Strategic Studies (ISS), Political Science Section.
    European Security Governance: The European Union in a Westphalian World2009Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book focuses on problems of, and prospects for, strengthening the global system of security governance in a manner consistent with the aspirations and practices of the EU. The Eu approach to security governance has been successful in its immediate neighbourhood: it has successfully exported its preferred norms and principles to applicant countries, thereby 'pacifying' its immediate neighbourhood and making all of Europe more secure. This edited volume addresses both the practical and political aspects of security governance and the barriers to the globalization of the EU system of security governance, particularly in teh multipolar post-Cold War era. This book will be of great interest to students of security governance, EU politics, European Security and IR in general.

  • 309.
    Watts, John
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Division of Strategy.
    Ledberg, Sofia
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Division of Strategy.
    Engelbrekt, Kjell
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section.
    Brothers in Arms, Yet Again?: Twenty-first Century Sino-Russian Strategic Collaboration in the Realm of Defence and Security2016In: Defence Studies, ISSN 1470-2436, E-ISSN 1743-9698, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 427-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    2014-2015 were years of turmoil for strategic relations, with Sino-Russian relations emerging as a particularly interesting set of ties to observe. This article asks whether recurrent Sino-Russian exhortations of friendship are mirrored by their strategic alignment in the defence and security realm, half a century after the end of the Sino-Soviet pact during the communist era. We examine the arms trade between the two countries and with regional partners, but also the recent pattern of bilateral and multilateral military exercises, as a combined test of the security and defence relationship.  We are able to show that the image of friendship that both Moscow and Beijing like to promote, while apparent at the UN Security Council and within the BRICS group, remains constrained by rivalry in high-tech segments of the arms industry and by lingering concerns about the prospects of peer interference in their shared regional vicinity.

  • 310.
    Weibull, Louise
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section. Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för ekonomi, kommunikation och IT, Avdelningen för arbetsvetenskap.
    Emotion matters: Emotion management in Swedish Peace Support Operations2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
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  • 311.
    Weibull, Louise
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section.
    Post-Deployment Disorientation: The emotional remains of uneventful peace support operations2012In: Res militaris, ISSN 2265-6294, Vol. 2, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is widely recognized that participation in high-intensity military missions abroad can result in discomforts, serious health conditions, and psychological consequences for the individual. This article, however, focuses on soldiers' experiences after service in two relatively calm mission areas. It aims to contribute to a discussion of the emotional price soldiers pay even when participating under these circumstances. It argues that although the general view among soldiers is that service abroad is a unique, rewarding and cherished experience, we should further recognize it as an accomplishment that also has other transformative properties. This is often manifested in what is here named 'Post-Deployment Disorientation' (PDD), invoking a different outlook on life and navigation in the social world. This article explores the soldiers' sense-making of this change by adopting an emotion-focused sociological perspective. Confirmation of assumptions made is presented through reference to interviews with 24 Swedish soldiers before, during and after their deployments to Kosovo and Liberia.

  • 312.
    Weibull, Louise
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section. Karlstad universitet.
    Karlsson, Jan Christer
    Karlstads universitet.
    "Don't fight the blue elephant": Humorous Signs as Protests and Conductors of Negotiations in Swedish Peace Support Operations2013In: Res Militaris, E-ISSN 2265-6294, ISSN 2265-6294, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses upon the role of humour among Swedish soldiers deployed on peace supportoperations, and more specifically on ‘applied' workplace humour (Mulkay, 1988). Applied humour makes certain points about situations, social groups or phenomena beyond pure entertainment. Data refers first and foremost to workplace signs encountered at military compounds in Liberia, Kosovo, Afghanistan, and interviews with 26 Swedish soldiers before, during and after their deployments. The findings suggest that humorous exchanges in missions abroad are omnipresent and serve many purposes: humour is a space for release from various stresses involved in a strictly hierarchical organization as well as in subordination to rules, policies and designed roles - but also where barbed ideas inappropriate for serious communication are vented (Fine, 1988). It is further argued that differences in the nature of operations (i.e. threat level and work tasks) is reflected in the messages' content. Even if the overall purpose of the humorous discourse seems to be more of a safety valve and ‘cathartic-ritual' than making a claim for change, this might in turn depend on the conviction that there is no alternative. Overall, the paper adds to the literature a description of humorous exchanges in a highly structured organizational setting where the need for sense-making is ever present. 

  • 313.
    Weissmann, Mikael
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för markoperationer (KV Mark). Utrikespolitiska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hagström, Linus
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section. Utrikespolitiska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sanctions Reconsidered: the Path Forward with North Korea2016In: The Washington quarterly, ISSN 0163-660X, E-ISSN 1530-9177, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 61-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There have been regular predictions of North Korea’s imminent collapse. Yet, by adapting to changing circumstances, and finding new supply lines and revenue streams, the state has managed to bypass an increasingly strict sanctions regime aimed at rolling back its nuclear program. This article details the economic flows that continue to keep North Korea alive, against all odds, but argued that these areas are difficult to target as even “smart sanctions” are highly likely to have a range of adverse effects on the wider population. That said, this article recommends continued monitoring of the arms trade, and measures to squeeze the court economy and to target remittances from exported laborers. Yet such efforts have to be combined with a smarter diplomacy built on engagement.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Sanctions Reconsidered
  • 314.
    Winkler, Stephanie
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section, Sektionen för säkerhetespolitik och strategi. Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk historia och internationella relationer.
    'Soft power is such a benign animal': narrative power and the reification of concepts in Japan2019In: Cambridge Review of International Affairs, ISSN 0955-7571, E-ISSN 1474-449X, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 483-501Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to analyse how the seemingly natural fit between Japan and the soft power concept has been possible despite the notorious vagueness of the concept and what the consequences of soft power's reification are. By building on recent scholarship on concepts, expert knowledge and narratives, the article suggests that reification processes are best conceptualized as driven by concept coalitions. The article finds that soft power was narrated and nurtured into Japan's cultural diplomacy, Japan's relationship with the United States (US) and its security policy. The article, moreover, shows that the more soft power was understood, framed and accepted as benign and necessary, the more persuasive arguments about what Japan should do or be in order to wield soft power became. This has legitimized narratives that suggest that Japan's 'proactive contribution to peace' as a responsible ally of the US constitutes an inevitable source of soft power.

4567 301 - 314 of 314
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