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  • 1.
    Brenner, Björn
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Division of Strategy.
    Gaza Under Hamas: From Islamic Democracy to Islamist Governance2017Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Hamas is designated a terrorist organization by Israel, the EU, the USA and the UN. It has made itself notorious for its violent radicalism and uncompromising rejection of the Jewish state. So after its victory in the 2006 elections the world was watching. How would Hamas govern? Could an Islamist group without any experience of power - and with an unwavering ideology - manage to deal with day-to-day realities on the ground? Bjorn Brenner investigates what happened after the elections and puts the spotlight on the people over whom Hamas rules, rather than on its ideas. Lodging with Palestinian families and experiencing their daily encounters with Hamas, he offers an intimate perspective of the group as seen through local eyes. The book is based on hard-to-secure interviews with a wide range of key political and security figures in the Hamas administration, as well as with military commanders and members of the feared Qassam Brigades. Brenner has also sought out those that Hamas identifies as local trouble makers: the extreme Salafi-Jihadis and members of the now more quiescent mainstream Fatah party led by Mahmoud Abbas. The book provides a new interpretation of one of the most powerful forces in the Israel-Palestine arena, arguing that the Gazan Islamists carry a potential to be much more flexible and pragmatic than anticipated - if they would think they stand to gain from it. Gaza under Hamas investigates the key challenges to Hamas's authority and reveals why and in what ways ideology comes second to power consolidation.

  • 2.
    Cilluffo, Frank J
    et al.
    George Washington University.
    Cozzens, Jeffrey B
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security and Strategic Studies (ISS), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Foreign Fighters: Trends, Trajectories and Conflict Zones2010Report (Other academic)
  • 3. Cozzens, Jeff
    et al.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Does al Qaeda continue to pose a serious international threat?: YES: The Enduring al-Qa’ida Threat: A Network Perspective2012In: Contemporary Debates on Terrorism / [ed] Richard Jackson and Justin Sinclair, London: Routledge, 2012, p. 90-96Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Gustafsson, Linus
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Hyllengren, Peder
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Ledarskapscentrum.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    From the Welfare State to the Caliphate: How a Swedish suburb became a breeding ground for foreign fighters streaming into Syria and Iraq.2015In: Foreign policy, ISSN 0015-7228, E-ISSN 1945-2276Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Gustafsson, Linus
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Swedish Foreign Fighters in Syria and Iraq: An Analysis of open-source intelligence and statistical data2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The conflict in Syria and Iraq has resulted in an increase in the number of violent Islamist extremists in Sweden, and a significant increase of people from Sweden travelling to join terrorist groups abroad. Since 2012 it is estimated that about 300 people from Sweden have travelled to Syria and Iraq to join terrorist groups such as the Islamic State (IS) and, to a lesser extent, al-Qaeda affiliated groups such as Jabhat al-Nusra. Even though the foreign fighter issue has been on the political agenda for several years and received considerable media attention, very little is known about the Swedish contingent.

    The purpose of this study is to examine a set of variables of the foreign fighters that have travelled from Sweden to join jihadi terrorist groups in Syria and Iraq in the period of June 2012 to September 2016. Much of the statistical data analysed have been declassified and provided by the Swedish Security Service. The variables examined are: time of travel; age; gender; geographical concentration in Sweden; citizenship and country of origin; average time spent in the conflict area; numbers of individuals killed; number of returnees; number of fighters remaining in the conflict area; social media activities; and the financing of foreign fighters. The analysis includes 267 people that are or have been residents of Sweden.

    36 people (first-time travellers) travelled to Syria or Iraq in 2012, 98 in 2013, 78 in 2014, 36 in 2015, and 5 in 2016. In addition, some of the foreign fighters have travelled back and forth between the conflict area and Sweden. About 80 percent are associated with IS, and more than 30 percent are associated with Jabhat al-Nusra. 76 percent of the foreign fighters are men and 24 percent are women. The amount of women has significantly changed during the period, from “a few” in 2012 to 18 percent in 2013, and constituting about 40 percent of the foreign fighters in the conflict area in 2014 and 2015.

    The average age of the foreign fighters is 26, and there are no significant differences between the average age of men and women. Still, there is a great variation indicating there are very young travellers but also older ones, as the age ranges in a span of 50 years. 18 percent of the travellers (45 people) are 19 or younger, while about 60 percent (154 people) are between the ages of 20 to 29. Very few people above the age of forty seem to travel. The average age does not change over the period.

    A majority of the foreign fighters, an estimated 80 percent, come from four of Sweden’s 21 counties – Västra Götaland, Stockholm, Skåne and Örebro. About one third of the foreign fighters are, or have been, registered in Västra Götaland County, one quarter in Stockholm County, and a tenth in Örebro County and a tenth in Skåne County. More than seventy percent have been residents of an exposed area (socially deprived areas hit by high criminality and low socioeconomic status). There is information that there have been recruiters in some of the areas, but social media may also have played a role in the mobilisation of foreign fighters.

    75 percent of the foreign fighters are Swedish citizens, and 34 percent are born in Sweden. There are geographical concentrations to North Africa, the Horn of Africa and the Middle East, as was seen in the 1990’s and 2000’s. There are also concentrations to the Former Yugoslavia and Russia. 38 countries are represented when analysing country of birth, and most of the foreign fighters have at least one parent with country of birth outside of Sweden.

    The average time spent in the conflict area is 16 months, but there is great variation where some foreign fighters have been there for only a month and others for several years. The average time spent for men is 16 months, while the average for women is 21 months.

    At least 49 people from Sweden have died in Syria or Iraq. All of them are men. The data shows that there are no indications that a larger group of the Swedish foreign fighters has been killed in one single battle. Not more than three people have died during a single month. About half of those who have died are from the Västra Götaland region.

    As of September 2016, 106 foreign fighters (40 percent) had returned to Sweden, while 112 (42 percent) were still in Syria or Iraq. It is estimated that 49 of the 267 (18 percent) have died in the conflict.

  • 6.
    Gustafsson, Linus
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Hyllengren, Peder
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Ledarskapscentrum.
    Vilken roll har polisen för att förebygga och förhindra våldsbejakande extremism?2014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Hansén, Dan
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Centre for Societal Security, CRISMART (National Center for Crisis Management Research and Training).
    Ranstorp, MagnusSwedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Centre for Societal Security, CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Cooperating Against Terrorism: EU-US Relations Post September 112007Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 8. Lygre, R B
    et al.
    Eid, J
    Larsson, Gerry
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Leadership and Management (ILM).
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security and Strategic Studies (ISS).
    Terrorism as a process: A critical review of Moghaddam's "Staircase to terrorism" model2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 52, no 6, p. 609-616Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study reviews empirical evidence for Moghaddam’s model “Staircase to Terrorism,” which portrays terrorism as a process of six consecutive steps culminating in terrorism. An extensive literature search, where 2,564 publications on terrorism were screened, resulted in 38 articles which were subject to further analysis. The results showed that while most of the theories and processes linked to Moghaddam’s model are supported by empirical evidence, the proposed transitions between the different steps are not. These results may question the validity of a linear stepwise model and may suggest that a combination of mechanisms/factors could combine in different ways to produce terrorism.

  • 9.
    Nicander, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Ranstorp, MagnusUniversity of St Andrews.
    Terrorism in the Information Age: New Frontiers?2004Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Normark, Magnus
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Ahlin, Filip
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Financial activities linked  to persons from Sweden  and Denmark who joined  terrorist groups in Syria  and Iraq during the period  2013 ‐ 2016: Report commissioned by Finansinspektionen2017Report (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Normark, Magnus
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Ahlin, Filip
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Finansiella aktiviteter kopplade till personer från Sverige och Danmark som anslutit sig till terrorgrupper i Syrien och Irak mellan 2013 - 2016: Rapport på uppdrag av Finansinspektionen2017Report (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    University of St Andrews.
    Al-Qa'ida - An Expanded Global Network of Terror2005In: RUSI Journal, ISSN 0307-1847, E-ISSN 1744-0378, Vol. 150, no 3, p. 40-43Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    University of St Andrews.
    Al-Qaida in Cyberspace: Future Challenges of Terrorism in an Information Age2004In: Terrorism in the information age: new frontiers? / [ed] Lars Nicander & Magnus Ranstorp, Försvarshögskolan (FHS), 2004, p. 58-72Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Förord till den svenska utgåvan2005In: 11 septemberrapporten: Nationella kommissionens slutrapport om terroristattacken i USA / [ed] Auktoriserad utgåva, Stockholm: Prisma , 2005, p. xi-xxiiChapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Hamas2005In: Motives, Means and Mayhem: Terrorist Acquisition and Use of Unconventional Weapons / [ed] John Parachini, Santa Monica, CA.: Rand Corporation, 2005Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Hezbollah Training Camps in Lebanon2006In: The Making of a Terrorist: Recruitment, Training and Root Causes. Vol. 2, Training / [ed] James J.F. Forest, Praeger, 2006Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    University of St Andrews.
    Hezbollah's Command Leadership: Its Structure, Decision- Making and Relationship with Iranian Clergy and Institutions1994In: Terrorism and Political Violence, ISSN 0954-6553, E-ISSN 1556-1836, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 303-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Any analysis of the behaviour of the pro‐Iranian Hizbollah organisation in Lebanon requires both an understanding of the movement itself, in terms of its decision‐making apparatus and internal clerical factionalism, and the mechanisms of its institutionalised relationship with Iran and, to a lesser extent, Syria through military and civilian channels at work within Lebanon. This article argues that Hizbollah's behaviour is principally governed by the depth and allegiance of closely forged relationships between individual Hizbollah leaders and Iranian clergy as well as the adaptability of a particular Hizbollah leader to suit the movement's activity to specific requirements within Lebanon and in the region. As such, clerical factionalism within Hizbollah can be monitored by the ascendancy or demotion of clergymen over the leadership and is also a guide to the direction of the movement in Lebanon as well as to the affiliation and loyalty of Hizbollah's leadership with clerical factions and institutions in Iran.

  • 18.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    University of St Andrews.
    Hezbollah's Future?: Part 11995In: Jane's Intelligence Review, ISSN 1350-6226, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 34-36Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    University of St Andrews.
    Hezbollah's Future?: Part 21995In: Jane's Intelligence Review, ISSN 1350-6226, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 81-83Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20. Ranstorp, Magnus
    Hizb'allah in Lebanon: The Politics of the Western Hostage Crisis1997Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Lebanese Hizb'Alla organisation and its involvement in the abduction of Western citizens is a complex subject veiled in secrecy which plagued the conduct of foreign policy for most Western governments for over a decade. The West's chequered response to the hostage-crisis underlines the dilemma of the fulfilment of these state's duty to protect their citizens taken hostage abroad without major sacrifices in the conduct of foreign policy. This study demonstrates that the abduction of Western citzens by the Hizb'Allah was motivated either by internal organisational requirements or in alignment with Syrian and Iranian interests and that mechanisms for the resolution of the hostage-crisis were subject to continuous interaction between Hizb'Allah, Iran, and Syria, influenced by internal Lebanese, regional and international events.

  • 21.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    International Responses to the Global Terrorist Threat: Where are We Post-9/112005In: Terrorism in the UK - Broadening the Government's Counter-Terrorist Response - CONTEST / [ed] Wyn Bowen; Andrew Stewart, Shrivenham: UK Defence Academy , 2005Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    University of St Andrews.
    Interpreting the broader context and meaning of Bin‐Laden's Fatwa1998In: Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, ISSN 1057-610X, E-ISSN 1521-0731, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 321-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyzes the “inner logic” of the fatwa issued by Usamah Bin‐Laden and a coalition of four other Islamic movements on 22 February 1998. Having first discussed the significance of the “Bin‐Laden phenomenon “ on terrorism in general, an analysis is made of the underlying reasons and broader context of Bin‐Laden's worldview and the fatwa’s appeal to his followers for violent action. It is argued that thisfatwa, when combined with the content of Bin‐Laden's “Declaration of War” in 1996, is neither revolutionary nor unique to broader Muslim concerns but rather is part and parcel of a broader contest over sacred authority in Saudi Arabia and over continued U.S. military presence on the Arabian peninsula. These issues are explored, coupled with the way in which the fatwa illuminates crucial factors behind the behavior of Bin‐Laden and other Islamic revolutionaries.

  • 23.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    'Lone Wolf Terrorism': The Case of Anders Breivik2013In: Sicherheit und Frieden, ISSN 0175-274X, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 87-92Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Mapping Terrorism Research: State of the art, gaps and future direction2006Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security and Strategic Studies (ISS), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Mapping Terrorism Studies After 9/11: an Academic Field of Old Problems and New Prospects2009In: Critical Terrorism Studies: a New Research Agenda / [ed] Jackson, Richard & Smyth, Marie & Gunning, Jeroe, London: Routledge , 2009, p. 13-33Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Preventing Violent Radicalization: The Case of Indonesia2009Report (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Research challenges involved in field study on terrorism in the Middle East2013In: Conducting Terrorism Field Research: A Guide / [ed] Adam Dolnik, Routledge, 2013, p. 46-61Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    University of St Andrews.
    Saudi Arabia and the Global Fight Against Al Qaida2004In: RUSI Journal, ISSN 0307-1847, E-ISSN 1744-0378, Vol. 149, no 1, p. 32-35Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Terrorism in 2011: bin Laden, the Arab Spring and... Breivik2013In: The emerging Global Security Environment / [ed] Bo Huldt, Pekka Sivonen, Tomas Ries, Camilla Huldt, Stockholm: Försvarshögskolan (FHS), 2013, p. 271-300Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    University of St Andrews.
    Terrorism in the Name of Religion1996In: Journal of International Affairs, ISSN 0022-197X, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 41-62Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Terrorist Awakening in Sweden?2011In: CTC Sentinel, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 1-5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    The Israeli-Palestinian Peace Process: The Strategic Art of Deception2006In: Challenges to Peace-building: Managing Spoilers During Conflict Resolution / [ed] Edward Newman & Oliver P Richmond, Tokyo: United Nations University Press, 2006Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    University of St Andrews.
    The strategy and tactics of Hizballah's current ‘Lebanonization process’1998In: Mediterranean Politics, ISSN 1362-9395, E-ISSN 1743-9418, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 103-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    This article contains a careful description and analysis of the transformation of Hizballah from a small rag‐tag militia, skillfully combining terrorist and guerrilla warfare techniques with effective social action on the local level during the chaos of Lebanon's civil war, to a formidable, legitimate political, military and social force on the Lebanese scene in the 1990's, in what has been described as its ‘Lebanonization’ process. This so‐called ‘Lebanonization’ process of Hizballah has become a trademark of the movement. It is visible in the close interrelationship between its political, social, and military activity which has extended its opportunities. It shows an ability to exercise pragmatic judgement within the conditions and limitations imposed on it by Syria's agenda and within the confessional nature of Lebanon's political make‐up. It also demonstrates the limits of Hizballah's manoeuvring within the framework of the wider Iranian‐Syrian relationship and the limits to its ability in presenting itself as an alternative oppositional force amidst sectarian politics and Syrian hegemony. Hizballah strongly emphasizes that it is entirely Lebanese in character rather than a foreign entity directed by Iran in order to reinforce its internal legitimacy within Lebanon.

  • 34.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    The Virtual Sanctuary of Al-Qaeda and Terrorism in an Age of Globalisation2007In: International Relations and Security in the Digital Age / [ed] Johan Eriksson, Giampiero Giacomello, London: Routledge, 2007Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Understanding violent radicalisation: terrorist and jihadist movements in Europe2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Utveckling och säkerhet: Metoder för att motverka radikalisering och terrorism i Indonesien2009Report (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security and Strategic Studies (ISS), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Väkivaltainen Islamistinen Terrorismi Ruotsissa2011In: Suomi, terrorismi, Supo: koira, joka ei haukkunut: miksi ja miten Suomi on välttynyt terroristisen toiminnan leviämiseltä? / [ed] Anssi Kullberg, Helsinki: Werner Söderström Osakeyhtiö , 2011, p. 362-380Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Centre for Societal Security, CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Ahlin, Filip
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Centre for Societal Security, CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Hyllengren, Peder
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Ledarskapscentrum.
    Normark, Magnus
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Centre for Societal Security, CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Mellan salafism och salafistisk jihadism: Påverkan mot och utmaningar för det svenska samhället2018Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna studie undersöker påverkan från salafistiska och salafist-jihaditiska miljöer i Sverige samt relationendem emellan. Fokus läggs på framväxten av salafist-jihadistiska miljöer i Sverige samt omgärdande salafistiskaelement; vilka budskap miljöerna förmedlar, metoder för påverkan samt vilken upplevd påverkan miljöerna hari svenska lokalsamhällen.

    Myndigheten för samhällsskydd och beredskap (MSB) har beställt och finansierat genomförandet av dennaforskningsrapport (alt. studierapport). Författarna är ensamma ansvariga för rapportens innehåll.

  • 39.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Brun, Hans
    Terrorism Learning and Innovation: Lessons from PIRA in Northern Ireland: A closed workshop summary2013Report (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Centre for Societal Security, CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Dos Santos, Josefine
    Hot mot demokrati och värdegrund - en lägesbild från Malmö2009Report (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    et al.
    University of St Andrews.
    Gunaratna, Rohan
    Taking on the kidnappers2001In: Jane's Intelligence Review, ISSN 1350-6226, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 10-11Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 42.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Gustafsson, Linus
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Hyllengren, Peder
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Ledarskapscentrum.
    Förebyggande av våldsbejakande extremism på lokal nivå: Exempel och lärdomar från Sverige och Europa2015Report (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Herd, Graeme
    George C. Marshall Center.
    Approaches to Countering Terrorism and CIST2007In: The Ideological War on Terror: Worldwide Strategies For Counter-Terrorism / [ed] Anne Aldis,Graeme Herd, London: Routledge, 2007Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Hyllengren, Peder
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Ledarskapscentrum.
    Förebyggande av våldsbejakande extremism i tredjeland: Åtgärder för att förhindra att personer ansluter sig till väpnade extremistgrupper i konfliktzoner2013Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 45.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Hyllengren, Peder
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Ledarskapscentrum.
    Prevention of violent extremism in third countries: measures to prevent individuals joining armed extremist groups in conflict zones : executive summary2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report of the prevention of violent extremism in conflict zones is the result of the government commission given to the Swedish National Defence College in December 2011. The problem of young men travelling to conflict zones such as Somalia, Pakistan - and now recently Syria - to fight has become increasingly apparent in several European countries. The report deals with experience and lessons from, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Germany and Denmark as regards the preventive work these countries undertake to address violent Islamic extremism - both at home and abroad. Particular emphasis is placed on lessons learned regarding recruitment to conflict zones. In respect to countries outside the EU, particular attention is given to preventive measures in Pakistan, Somalia and Kenya. The report also considers consequences for the situation in Sweden and provides recommendations for consideration in Sweden.

  • 46.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security and Strategic Studies (ISS), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Normark, MagnusSwedish National Defence College, Department of Security and Strategic Studies (ISS), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Unconventional weapons and international terrorism: challenges and new approaches2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Normark, MagnusSwedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Understanding Terrorism Innovation and Learning : Al-Qaeda and Beyond2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book examines the role of terrorist innovation and learning in theory and practice, within the context of three specific EU case-studies.

    The starting point for this book was twofold; first, to examine the issue of innovation and learning more generically both in theory, within specific themes, and within the context of al-Qaeda’s influence on this process; second, this book examines the evolution of specific al-Qaeda-related plots in three specific northern EU states – the United Kingdom, Denmark and Germany – where there has been a significant volume of planned, failed and executed terrorist plots. In particular, these case studies explore signs of innovation and learning.

  • 48.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Wilkinson, Paul
    Terrorism and Human Rights2007Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book reinforces our knowledge and understanding of the problems involved in balancing human rights protection and security concerns, considering how these human rights issues have been raised by the various international debates and policy issues which have been created by the continuing global war on terrorism. In the shadow of 9/11 the threat of terrorism is an ever increasing global preoccupation. Terrorism and Human Rights discusses the effects of the legal and social aspects of terrorism by examining the relation between security issues and human rights from the angle of international organizations, political bodies and different countries. Some of the examples covered and which are examined in light of their approach and reaction to terrorism include the European Union, the UN, Russia and the United States. Previously published as a special issue of Terrorism and Political Violence, this volume will be useful for all students of security, politics and terrorism studies, but also for policy makers, legislators, and law enforcers.

  • 49.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    et al.
    University of St Andrews.
    Xhudo, Gus
    A Threat to Europe?: Middle East Ties with the Balkans and Their Impact Upon Terrorist Activity throughout the Region1994In: Terrorism and Political Violence, ISSN 0954-6553, E-ISSN 1556-1836, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 196-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The internecine warfare in the former Yugoslavia has radicalised many Islamic movements in the region and facilitated close links between local Balkan groups and Middle East states as well as terrorist organisations. This article examines the spread of militant Islamic fundamentalism in the Balkans as well as in Kosovo, Macedonia, Bulgaria, Turkey, and Albania. The scope of linkages between Balkan Islamic movements and Iran pose serious concern for Western governments as a long‐term threat to any stability and democratisation in the Balkan region as it has intensified illegal activity throughout the area and heightened irredentist claims.

  • 50. Saab, Bilal Y.
    et al.
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    Al-Qaeda’s Terrorist Threat to UNIFIL2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    On August 11, 2006, in response to the 34-day summer war between Israel and Hizb’allah, the United Nations Security Council passed resolution 1701, which called for a more robust international military presence along the United Nations-drawn Blue Line dividing Israel and southern Lebanon. But the strengthened United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) is likely to face a range of security threats that could undermine its peacekeeping duties and endanger its personnel. Among the more serious threats, underscored by intelligence reports over the past few years that indicate a growing al-Qaeda presence in Lebanon, is a catastrophic terrorist attack against UNIFIL by local salafist jihadist entities.

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