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  • 1.
    Kronlund, Anna
    et al.
    University of Jyväskylä, (FIN).
    Vaittinen, Tiina
    Tampere University, (FIN).
    Räkköläinen, Mikko
    Tampere University, (FIN).
    Vastapuu, Leena
    Tampere Peace Research Institute (TAPRI), (FIN).
    Politiikasta-raati: Kansainvälisten suhteiden tutkimuksen sokeat pisteet2022In: Politiikasta, ISSN 2323-7090Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Puumala, Eeva
    et al.
    Tampere University, (FIN).
    Vastapuu, Leena
    Swedish Defence University, Department of War Studies and Military History, Strategy Division. Swedish Defence University, Department of War Studies and Military History, Functions and Perspective Division.
    Kynsilehto, Anitta
    Tampere University, (FIN).
    Muuttuva maailma ja Ukrainan sodan globaalit ulottuvuudet2022In: Kosmopolis, ISSN 1236-1372, Vol. 52, no 4, p. 3-7Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Vastapuu, Leena
    Tampere Peace Research Institute, Tampere, Finland, European Union Advisory Mission in the Central African Republic, Bangui, Central African Republic.
    Auto-photography2021In: The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Peace and Conflict Studies / [ed] Oliver Richmond, Gëzim Visoka, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2021Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Vastapuu, Leena
    Swedish Defence University, Department of War Studies and Military History, Strategy Division. Swedish Defence University, Department of War Studies and Military History, Functions and Perspective Division.
    Beans, Bullets and Bandages? Gendered and Racialised Othering in the Depiction of Military Support WorkIn: Civil Wars, ISSN 1369-8249, E-ISSN 1743-968XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Combat Service Support (CSS) refers to the direct and indirect sustainment services to the soldiers and units (potentially) engaged in combat activities. In the Global North militaries support work is called CSS and considered vital for the armed forces, while support work in ‘irregular’ forces of the Global South is rarely addressed, apart from feminist research. Through intersectional reading, I suggest that this discrepancy can be best explained by gendered and racialised forms of othering where ‘feminine’ care work (the first other) and ‘irregularity’ (the second other) are mutually reinforcing. Drawing on interview data with Oretha, as well as other Liberian CSS specialists, I show the practical implications of this form of (double-)othering in war and its aftermath.

  • 5.
    Vastapuu, Leena
    EU CSDP Advisory Mission in the Central African Republic (EUAM RCA).
    Non abbastanza soldati, non abbastanza civili: la continua sotto-rappresentanza delle donne nei programmi di DDR2021In: Human Security, ISSN 2531-4998, no 15, p. 4-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [it]

    Nonostante le donne partecipino, da sempre e a vario titolo, a conflitti armati in tutto il mondo, esse tendono a scomparire dai radar durante il periodo di transizione tra guerra e pace. Ciò è particolarmente vero per le donne soldato. Le ex-combattenti non si siedono ai tavoli di pace a cui al massimo sono invitate solo le rappresentanti di organizzazioni di donne più convenzionali che ci si aspetta parlino a nome di tutte le donne e le ragazze. Le ex-combattenti non sono attivamente incoraggiate a partecipare ai programmi di disarmo, smobilitazione e reintegrazione (Disarmament, Demobilisation and Reintegration – DDR), e tanto meno incluse nella loro pianificazione. Mentre i comandanti uomini fanno pressioni per includere i loro uomini e ragazzi, le donne e le ragazze devono cavarsela da sole. [...]  L'articolo completo è disponibile sul sito del Torino World Affairs Institute (T.wai).

  • 6.
    Vastapuu, Leena
    EU Advisory Mission, Central African Republic, Tampere Peace Research Institute, (FIN).
    Not enough soldier, not enough civilian: The continuing under-representation of female soldiers in Disarmament, Demobilisation, and Reintegration (DDR) programmes2021In: Routledge Handbook of Feminist Peace Research / [ed] Tarja Väyrynen, Swati Parashar, Élise Féron, Catia Cecilia Confortini, London: Routledge, 2021, p. 231-239Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women soldiers are grossly under-represented in Disarmament, Demobilisation and Reintegration (DDR) programmes when compared to their actual number in fighting forces. Even though the everyday reasons for this phenomenon are increasingly understood, the ideological and class-based explanations remain underexplored. In this chapter, I answer to this call from feminist peace research perspective. I argue that both mainstream women’s organisations as well as state-building traditionalists tend to justify the neglect of women soldiers along similar lines of reasoning: more urgent matters need to be prioritised rather than this “marginal” phenomenon. In practice, a woman soldier is not enough civilian in the eyes of mainstream women’s organisations, but she is simultaneously not enough soldier in the eyes of DDR practitioners, and, as a result, she remains neglected. This chapter demonstrates the resourcefulness of feminist peace research in highly fragile environments and exemplifies its power to provide empirically informed analysis to serve academics and policy-makers alike.

  • 7.
    Vastapuu, Leena
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of War Studies and Military History, Strategy Division. Swedish Defence University, Department of War Studies and Military History, Functions and Perspective Division.
    Lyytikäinen, Minna
    University of Helsinki, (FIN).
    Gender Equality in Finnish Foreign Affairs from 2019 to 2022: Independent study commissioned by the Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Finland2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study reviews the ways in which Finland has promoted gender equality in its foreign affairs from January 2019 to October 2022. Drawing from expert interviews and document analysis, it examines policy and programmes across all areas of Finnish foreign policy. In addition, it undertakes a case study of Sweden and Spain, two countries that have exercised explicitly Feminist Foreign Policy (FFP) in recent years, and compares these findings to the baseline analysis of Finland. The results indicate that Finland has incorporated gender equality to some extent in all areas of foreign policy, and most effectively so in the areas of development cooperation and human rights policy. Finland has also reached gender parity in diplomatic leadership as well as near parity among experts seconded to civilian crisis management missions. However, Finland’s traditional security and defence policies in particular suffer from gender amnesia, which is well demonstrated in the recent policy documents related to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, and Finland’s ensuing NATO accession process in the spring of 2022.

    When gender equality is included in security policy, such as in the Women, Peace and Security Agenda, or in diplomatic efforts outside the human rights policy realm, Finland’s predefined priorities of sexual and reproductive health and rights, gender-based violence, disability inclusion and intersectionality are only rarely referred to. Instead, gender equality is promoted in more narrow terms primarily by increasing women’s participation through gender balancing. This is understandable since Finland does not currently have a clear strategy to guide its international gender equality efforts.The case studies of Sweden and Spain suggest that while adopting an explicit FFP has transformative potential, it is not a magic bullet if not planned and implemented with utmost care. At the same time, the adoption process provides a window of opportunity for governments to redefine and sharpen their gender equality policies in foreign affairs, as well as reinforce coordination efforts with other governmental actors and with civil society.

    Finland’s strong reputation and expertise in gender equality provides it with an excellent opportunity to develop a transformative and intersectional foreign policy, whether named as feminist or not. If backed with the necessary financial and human resources, and a carefully drafted dissemination strategy, it has all the possibilities to create something innovative and new. This is important in today’s polarised world, where gender equality, women’s rights, and human rights norms are under continuous attack.

  • 8.
    Wibben, Annick T.R.
    et al.
    Gender, Peace & Security Research Group, University of San Francisco, USA.
    Confortini, Catia Cecilia
    Peace Studies, Wellesley College, USA.
    Roohi, Sanam
    Max-Weber-Kolleg: for Advanced Cultural and Social Studies, Erfurt University, Germany.
    Aharoni, Sarai
    Gender Studies Program, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Israel.
    Vastapuu, Leena
    Tampere Peace Research Institute,Tampere University, Finland.
    Vaittinen, Tiina
    Faculty of Social Sciences,Tampere University, Finland.
    Collective Discussion: Piecing-Up Feminist Peace Research2019In: International Political Sociology, ISSN 1749-5679, E-ISSN 1749-5687, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 86-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Feminist peace research is an emerging field of social sciences that is transdisciplinary, intersectional, and normative—as well as transnational. Although it draws from disciplines such as peace and conflict research (in and outside of international relations [IR]) as well as feminist security studies, it also differs from them in terms of research scope and research design. Consequently, it not only provides insights on what can be termed “spectacular” instances of violence or peace but also sharpens our analysis of the everydayness of reconciliatory measures and the mundaneness of both violence and peace. As a feminist endeavor, feminist peace research necessarily asks questions about unequal gender relations and power structures within any given conflict environment. In this collective discussion piece, a diverse group of scholars, who formed part of the recently convened Feminist Peace Research Network, explores and further develops the parameters of this emergent field through a set of short conversation pieces.

1 - 8 of 8
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