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  • 1.
    Albrecht, Frederike
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Political Science and Law, Political Science Division. Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Natural hazards as political events: framing and politicisation of floods in the United Kingdom2022In: Environmental Hazards: Human and Policy Dimensions, ISSN 1747-7891, E-ISSN 1878-0059, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 17-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how disasters are framed and politicised in the media to provide a systematic assessment of discursive dynamics and external political contexts of natural hazards. Utilising an actor-focused approach, it contributes with knowledge on how politicisation of disaster discourses unfolds. Two similar natural hazard events, the United Kingdom floods of 2005 and 2015, are investigated by means of a content analysis and a political claims analysis. The study finds that a tension between the national government and its contestants following the 2015 floods led to a framing contest which was heavily affected by the external political context at the time. The opposition and journalists constructed a narrative of government failure, not least by intertwining the event with the politically tense situation in the United Kingdom to further populist claims about government spending and EU policies. In 2005, the lack of a comparable external context and polarisation between actors in the media prevented a politicisation of the floods in the immediate aftermath of the disaster. These results illustrate the importance of broader political contexts, even those essentially unrelated to the natural hazard, for the politicisation of a disaster.

  • 2.
    Albrecht, Frederike
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section, Sektionen för krishantering och internationell samverkan.
    Karlsson, Christer
    Uppsala University (SWE).
    Persson, Thomas
    Uppsala University (SWE).
    Patterns of Parliamentary Opposition: Empirical Evidence from the Deliberations in the German Bundestag’s Committee on European Union Affairs.2021In: Parliamentary Affairs, ISSN 0031-2290, E-ISSN 1460-2482, Vol. 74, no 1, p. 230-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines patterns of oppositional behaviour in the GermanBundestag’s Committee on European Union Affairs (EAC) for two separate legislative periods (2005–2009 and 2009–2013). The study makes two contributionsto previous research. It, first, shed some much-needed empirical light on politicalopposition in the Bundestag by examining how much and what kind of opposition exists in the German EAC. Secondly, the article examines the differences inoppositional behaviour of the Members of Parliament between the two legislative periods following an institutional reform in 2009 that afforded theBundestag with increased opportunity structures in Europen Union affairs.

  • 3.
    Albrecht, Frederike
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section, Sektionen för krishantering och internationell samverkan.
    Parker, Charles F.
    Department of Government, Uppsala University (SWE).
    Healing the Ozone Layer: The Montreal Protocol and the Lessons and Limits of a Global Governance Success Story2019In: Great policy successes: or, A tale about why it's amazing that governments get so little credit for their many everday and extraordinary achievements as told by sympathetic observers who seek to create space for a less relentlessly negative view of our pivotal public institutions / [ed] Mallory E. Compton, Paul 't Hart, Oxford University Press, 2019, p. 304-319Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Montreal Protocol - the regime designed to protect the stratospheric ozone layer - has widely been hailed as the gold standard of global environmental governance and is one of few examples of international institutional cooperative arrangements successfully solving complex transnational problems. Although the stratospheric ozone layer still bears the impacts of ozone depleting substances (ODSs), the problem of ozone depletion is well on its way to being solved due to the protocol. This chapter examines how the protocol was designed and implemented in a way that has allowed it to successfully overcome a number of thorny challenges that most international environmental regimes must face: how to attract sufficient participation, how to promote compliance and manage non-compliance, how to strengthen commitments over time, how to neutralize or co-opt potential ‘veto players’, how to make the costs of implementation affordable, how to leverage public opinion in support of the regime’s goals, and, ultimately, how to promote the behavioural and policy changes needed to solve the problems and achieve the goals the regime was designed to solve. The chapter concludes that while some of the reasons for the Montreal Protocol’s success, such as fairly affordable, available substitutes for ODSs, are not easy to replicate, there are many other elements of this story that can be utilized when thinking about how to design solutions to other transnational environmental problems.

  • 4.
    Lindholm, Jenny
    et al.
    Political Science with Media and Communication, Åbo Akademi University, (FIN).
    Carlsson, Tom
    Political Science with Media and Communication, Åbo Akademi University, (FIN).
    Albrecht, Frederike
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Political Science and Law, Political Science Division.
    Hermansson, Helena
    Swedish Defence University, Institutionen för ledarskap och ledning, Leadership and Command & Control Division Stockholm.
    Communicating Covid-19 on social media: Analysing the use of Twitter and Instagram by Nordic health authorities and prime ministers2023In: Communicating a pandemic: Crisis management and Covid-19 in the Nordic countries / [ed] Bengt Johansson; Øyvind Ihlen; Jenny Lindholm; Mark Blach-Ørsten, Göteborg: Nordicom, 2023, p. 149-172Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter analyses how Nordic health authorities and prime ministers used social media during the first wave of the Covid-19 pandemic. The research questions address the extent to which they interacted with other actors on social media and what communication objectives they pursued in messages to the public. The data consists of health authorities’ Twitter communication and prime ministers’ Instagram posts. The results show that both the health authorities and prime ministers primarily interacted internally with domestic governmental and administrative actors. Still, they pursued different communication objectives. Whereas the health authorities mainly instructed the public on how to act, the prime ministers provided support and appealed for solidarity. National differences are observed. The Danish case stands out, as both the national health authority and the prime minister clearly focused on communicating support to the public.

  • 5. Mondino, Elena
    et al.
    Scolobig, Anna
    Environmental Governance and Territorial Development Institute, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Borga, Marco
    Department of Land, Environment, Agriculture and Forestry, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.
    Albrecht, Frederike
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section, Sektionen för krishantering och internationell samverkan.
    Mård, Johanna
    Weyrich, Philippe
    Climate Policy Group, Department of Environmental Systems Science, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zürich), Zürich, Switzerland.
    Di Baldassarre, Giuliano
    Exploring changes in hydrogeological risk awareness and preparedness over time: a case study in northeastern ItalyIn: Hydrological Sciences Journal, ISSN 0262-6667, E-ISSN 2150-3435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrogeological hazards are increasingly causing damage worldwide due to climatic and socio-economic changes. Building resilient communities is crucial to reduce potential losses. To this end, one of the first steps is to understand how people perceive potential threats around them. This study aims at exploring how risk awareness of, and preparedness to, face hydrological hazards changes over time. A cohort study was carried out in two villages in the northeastern Italian Alps, Romagnano and Vermiglio, affected by debris flows in 2000 and 2002. Surveys were conducted in 2005 and 2018, and the results compared. The survey data show that both awareness and preparedness decreased over time. We attribute this change to the fact that no event had occurred in a long time and to a lack of proper risk communication strategies. The outcomes of this study contribute to socio-hydrological modelling by providing empirical data on human behaviour dynamics.

  • 6.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, (SWE).
    Parker, Charles F.
    Uppsala University, (SWE).
    Uexkull, Nina von
    Uppsala University, (SWE).
    Mård, Johanna
    Uppsala University, (SWE).
    Albrecht, Frederike
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section, Sektionen för krishantering och internationell samverkan. Uppsala University, (SWE).
    Petrova, Kristina
    Uppsala University, (SWE).
    Nyberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Karlstad University, (SWE).
    Göteman, Malin
    Uppsala University, (SWE).
    Hileman, Jacob
    Uppsala University, (SWE).
    Messori, Gabriele
    Uppsala University, (SWE).
    Baldassarre, Giuliano Di
    Uppsala University, (SWE).
    Disaster risk reduction and the limits of truisms: Improving the knowledge and practice interface2022In: International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, E-ISSN 2212-4209, Vol. 67, article id 102661Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Action toward strengthened disaster risk reduction (DRR) ideally builds from evidence-based policymaking to inform decisions and priorities. This is a guiding principle for the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (SFDRR), which outlines priorities for action to reduce disaster risk. However, some of these practical guidelines conceal oversimplified or unsubstantiated claims and assumptions, what we refer to as 'truisms', which, if not properly addressed, may jeopardize the long-term goal to reduce disaster risks. Thus far, much DRR research has focused on ways to bridge the gap between science and practice while devoting less attention to the premises that shape the understanding of DRR issues. In this article, written in the spirit of a perspective piece on the state of the DRR field, we utilize the SFDRR as an illustrative case to identify and interrogate ten selected truisms, from across the social and natural sciences, that have been prevalent in shaping DRR research and practice. The ten truisms concern forecasting, loss, conflict, migration, the local level, collaboration, social capital, prevention, policy change, and risk awareness. We discuss central claims associated with each truism, relate those claims to insights in recent DRR scholarship, and end with suggestions for developing the field through advances in conceptualization, measurement, and causal inference.

  • 7.
    Oriangi, George
    et al.
    Makerere Univ, Dept of Geog, Geo-Informat and Climat Sci, Kampala, Uganda; Uppsala Univ, Dept of Earth Sci, Centre of Natural hazards and Disaster Sci, Sweden; Lund Univ, Dept of Phys Geog & Ecosyst Sci, Lund, Sweden; Gulu Univ, Dept of Geog, Gulu, Uganda.
    Albrecht, Frederike
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section, Sektionen för krishantering och internationell samverkan.
    Bamutaze, Yazidhi
    Makerere Univ, Dept of Geog, Geo-Informat and Climat Sci, Kampala, Uganda.
    Mukwaya, Paul Isolo
    Makerere Univ, Dept of Geog, Geo-Informat and Climat Sci, Kampala, Uganda.
    Nakileza, Bob
    Makerere Univ, Dept of Geog, Geo-Informat and Climat Sci, Kampala, Uganda.
    Pilesjö, Petter
    Perceptions of resilience to climate-induced disasters in Mbale municipality in UgandaIn: Environmental Hazards: Human and Policy Dimensions, ISSN 1747-7891, E-ISSN 1878-0059Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resilience has been raised as a core task within disaster risk reduction frameworks, yet it remains difficult to implement these global ideas in local communities. This study used Community Based Resilience Analysis Approach to investigate the components that are perceived as important in resilience and the extent to which these components have been achieved. It explored the trend of resilience and beneficial interventions for building resilience as perceived by interviewed participants in Mbale Municipality in Eastern Uganda. The study results indicate that access to education, healthcare, employment, peace and security were the most important components of resilience. Respondents perceived to have progressed in accessing credit, building productive farms and sustaining peace and security by July 2017. However, they assessed a lack of diverse income-generating activities, access to insurance, food security, employment and health care. Moreover, the study showed that respondents from marginalised parts of the municipality experienced decreasing resilience while respondents in other divisions had increased resilience. These results provide context-specific components of resilience by the local people. This can inform the formulation of resilience indices and bear relevance for policy-makers and practitioners to understand areas to invest more resources to achieve resilience.

  • 8.
    Oriangi, George
    et al.
    Department of Geography, Geo-Informatics, and Climatic Sciences, Makerere University, Uganda; Department of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science, Lund University, Sweden; Department of Geography, Gulu University, Uganda.
    Albrecht, Frederike
    Department of Earth Sciences, Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Di Baldassarre, Giuliano
    Department of Earth Sciences, Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Bamutaze, Yazidhi
    Department of Geography, Geo-Informatics, and Climatic Sciences, Makerere University, Uganda.
    Mukwaya, Paul Isolo
    Department of Geography, Geo-Informatics, and Climatic Sciences, Makerere University, Uganda.
    Ardö, Jonas
    Department of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science, Lund University, Sweden.
    Pilesjö, Petter
    Department of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science, Lund University, Sweden.
    Household resilience to climate change hazards in Uganda2020In: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, ISSN 1756-8692, E-ISSN 1756-8706, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 59-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – As climate change shocks and stresses increasingly affect urban areas in developing countries, resilience is imperative for the purposes of preparation, recovery and adaptation. This study aims to investigate demographic characteristics and social networks that influence the household capacity to prepare, recover and adapt when faced with prolonged droughts or erratic rainfall events in Mbale municipality in Eastern Uganda.

    Design/methodology/approach – A cross-sectional research design was used to elicit subjective opinions. Previous studies indicate the importance of subjective approaches for measuring social resilience but their use has not been well explored in the context of quantifying urban resilience to climate change shocks and stresses. This study uses 389 structured household interviews to capture demographic characteristics, social networks and resilience capacities. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used for analysis.

    Findings – The ability of low-income households to meet their daily expenditure needs, household size, and networks with relatives and non government organizations (NGOs) were significant determinants of preparedness, recovery and adaptation to prolonged droughts or erratic rainfall events.

    Practical implications – The results imply that policymakers and practitioners have an important role vis-à-vis encouraging activities that boost the ability of households to meet their daily expenditure needs, promoting small household size and reinforcing social networks that enhance household resilience.

    Originality/value – Even the low-income households are substantially more likely to prepare for and recover from prolonged droughts or erratic rainfall events if they can meet their daily expenditure needs. This finding is noteworthy because the poorest in society are generally the most vulnerable to hazards.

  • 9.
    Ridolfi, Elena
    et al.
    Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, (SWE) / Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), (SWE).
    Albrecht, Frederike
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section, Sektionen för krishantering och internationell samverkan. Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden / Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden.
    Di Baldassarre, Giuliano
    Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, (SWE) / Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), (SWE).
    Exploring the role of risk perception in influencing flood losses over time2020In: Hydrological Sciences Journal, ISSN 0262-6667, E-ISSN 2150-3435, Vol. 65, no 1, p. 12-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What implications do societies’ risk perceptions have for flood losses? This study uses a stylized, socio-hydrological model to simulate the mutual feedbacks between human societies and flood events. It integrates hydrological modelling with cultural theory and proposes four ideal types of society that reflect existing dominant risk perception and management: risk neglecting, risk monitoring, risk downplaying and risk controlling societies. We explore the consequent trajectories of flood risk generated by the interactions between floods and people for these ideal types of society over time. The results suggest that flood losses are substantially reduced when awareness-raising attitudes are promoted through inclusive, participatory approaches in the community. In contrast, societies that rely on top-down hierarchies and structural measures to protect settlements on floodplains may still suffer significant losses during extreme events. This study illustrates how predictions formed through social science theories can be applied and tested in hydrological modelling.

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  • 10.
    Tagliacozzo, Serena
    et al.
    National Research Council of Italy, Institute for Research on Population and Social Policies, Rome, (ITA).
    Albrecht, Frederike
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section, Sektionen för krishantering och internationell samverkan.
    Ganapati, N. Emel
    Florida International University, Miami, FL, (USA).
    International Perspectives on COVID-19 Communication Ecologies: Public Health Agencies’ Online Communication in Italy, Sweden, and the United States2021In: American Behavioral Scientist, ISSN 0002-7642, E-ISSN 1552-3381, Vol. 65, no 7, p. 934-955Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Communicating during a crisis can be challenging for public agencies as their communication ecology becomes increasingly complex while the need for fast and reliable public communication remains high. Using the lens of communication ecology, this study examines the online communication of national public health agencies during the COVID-19 pandemic in Italy, Sweden, and the United States. Based on content analysis of Twitter data (n = 856) and agency press releases (n = 95), this article investigates two main questions: (1) How, and to what extent, did national public health agencies coordinate their online communication with other agencies and organizations? (2) How was online communication from the agencies diversified in terms of targeting specific organizations and social groups? Our findings indicate that public health agencies relied heavily on internal scientific expertise and predominately coordinated their communication efforts with national government agencies. Furthermore, our analysis reveals that agencies in each country differed in how they diversify information; however, all agencies provided tailored information to at least some organizations and social groups. Across the three countries, information tailored for several vulnerable groups (e.g., pregnant women, people with disabilities, immigrants, and homeless populations) was largely absent, which may contribute to negative consequences for these groups.

  • 11.
    Tagliacozzo, Serena
    et al.
    Italian National Research Council, Institute for Research on Population and Social Policies, Rome, Italy, (ITA).
    Albrecht, Frederike
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Political Science and Law, Political Science Division. Centre for Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ganapati, Nazife Emel
    Department of Public Policy and Administration, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA, (USA).
    Public agencies tweeting the COVID-19 pandemic: cross-country comparison of must have and forgotten communication topics2023In: Frontiers in Communication, E-ISSN 2297-900X, Vol. 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Despite the importance of national-level public health agenciesin times of a pandemic, there is limited comparative understanding of their must-have and forgotten pandemic-related communication topics.

    Methods: To fill this gap in the literature, this article presents an analysis of COVID related communication topics by national-level health agencies in Italy, Sweden, and the United States using the IDEA (Internalization, Distribution, Explanation,Action) model on crisis message framing. The public health agencies included in the study are the Italian National Institute of Health (Istituto Superiore di Sanità;ISS), the Public Health Agency of Sweden (Folkhälsomyndigheten), and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the US.

    Results: Based on these agencies’ Twitter posts (n = 856) in the first 3 monthsof the pandemic, the article reveals a greater attention paid to action oriented (e.g., disease prevention) and explanatory messages (e.g., disease trends) than to distribution (e.g., transmission) and internalizing messages (e.g., risk factors) inall three countries. The study also highlights dierences in terms of referrals to other communication channels and communication topics, especially in terms of these agencies’ emphasis on individual risk factors (related to the risk of a personsuering from serious COVID-19-related health consequences) and social risk factors (related to the chance of an individual to become infected with COVID-19 because of the social context).

    Discussion: The study’s findings call for better incorporation of information that is directly relevant to the receivers (internalizing messages) by public health agencies.

  • 12.
    Teutschbein, Claudia
    et al.
    Air, Water and Landscape Science, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, (SWE).
    Albrecht, Frederike
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Political Science and Law, Political Science Division. Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS).
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    Natural Resources and Sustainable Development, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, (SWE).
    Tootoonchi, Faranak
    Air, Water and Landscape Science, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, (SWE).
    Stenfors, Elin
    Air, Water and Landscape Science, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, (SWE).
    Grabs, Thomas
    Air, Water and Landscape Science, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, (SWE).
    Drought hazards and stakeholder perception: Unraveling the interlinkages between drought severity, perceived impacts, preparedness, and management2023In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 52, p. 1262-1281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The future risk for droughts and water shortages calls for substantial efforts by authorities to adapt at local levels. Understanding their perception of drought hazards, risk and vulnerability can help to identify drivers of and barriers to drought risk planning and management in achanging climate at the local level. This paper presents a novel interdisciplinary drought case study in Sweden that integrates soft data from a nationwide survey among more than 100 local practitioners and hard data based on hydrological measurements to provide a holistic assessment of the links between drought severity and the perceived levels of drought severity, impacts, preparedness, and management for two consecutive drought events. The paper highlights challenges for drought risk planning and management in a changing climate at the local level and elaborates on how improved understanding of local practitioners to plan for climate change adaptation can be achieved.

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