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  • 1.
    Albrecht, Frederike
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section, Sektionen för krishantering och internationell samverkan.
    Karlsson, Christer
    Uppsala University.
    Persson, Thomas
    Uppsala University.
    Patterns of Parliamentary Opposition: Empirical Evidence from the Deliberations in the German Bundestag’s Committee on European Union Affairs.In: Parliamentary Affairs, ISSN 0031-2290, E-ISSN 1460-2482Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Albrecht, Frederike
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section, Sektionen för krishantering och internationell samverkan.
    Parker, Charles F.
    Department of Government, Uppsala University.
    Healing the Ozone Layer: The Montreal Protocol and the Lessons and Limits of a Global Governance Success Story2019In: Great policy successes: or, A tale about why it's amazing that governments get so little credit for their many everday and extraordinary achievements as told by sympathetic observers who seek to create space for a less relentlessly negative view of our pivotal public institutions / [ed] Mallory E. Compton, Paul 't Hart, Oxford University Press, 2019, p. 304-319Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Montreal Protocol - the regime designed to protect the stratospheric ozone layer - has widely been hailed as the gold standard of global environmental governance and is one of few examples of international institutional cooperative arrangements successfully solving complex transnational problems. Although the stratospheric ozone layer still bears the impacts of ozone depleting substances (ODSs), the problem of ozone depletion is well on its way to being solved due to the protocol. This chapter examines how the protocol was designed and implemented in a way that has allowed it to successfully overcome a number of thorny challenges that most international environmental regimes must face: how to attract sufficient participation, how to promote compliance and manage non-compliance, how to strengthen commitments over time, how to neutralize or co-opt potential ‘veto players’, how to make the costs of implementation affordable, how to leverage public opinion in support of the regime’s goals, and, ultimately, how to promote the behavioural and policy changes needed to solve the problems and achieve the goals the regime was designed to solve. The chapter concludes that while some of the reasons for the Montreal Protocol’s success, such as fairly affordable, available substitutes for ODSs, are not easy to replicate, there are many other elements of this story that can be utilized when thinking about how to design solutions to other transnational environmental problems.

  • 3. Mondino, Elena
    et al.
    Scolobig, Anna
    Environmental Governance and Territorial Development Institute, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Borga, Marco
    Department of Land, Environment, Agriculture and Forestry, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.
    Albrecht, Frederike
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section, Sektionen för krishantering och internationell samverkan.
    Mård, Johanna
    Weyrich, Philippe
    Climate Policy Group, Department of Environmental Systems Science, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zürich), Zürich, Switzerland.
    Di Baldassarre, Giuliano
    Exploring changes in hydrogeological risk awareness and preparedness over time: a case study in northeastern ItalyIn: Hydrological Sciences Journal, ISSN 0262-6667, E-ISSN 2150-3435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrogeological hazards are increasingly causing damage worldwide due to climatic and socio-economic changes. Building resilient communities is crucial to reduce potential losses. To this end, one of the first steps is to understand how people perceive potential threats around them. This study aims at exploring how risk awareness of, and preparedness to, face hydrological hazards changes over time. A cohort study was carried out in two villages in the northeastern Italian Alps, Romagnano and Vermiglio, affected by debris flows in 2000 and 2002. Surveys were conducted in 2005 and 2018, and the results compared. The survey data show that both awareness and preparedness decreased over time. We attribute this change to the fact that no event had occurred in a long time and to a lack of proper risk communication strategies. The outcomes of this study contribute to socio-hydrological modelling by providing empirical data on human behaviour dynamics.

  • 4.
    Oriangi, George
    et al.
    Makerere Univ, Dept of Geog, Geo-Informat and Climat Sci, Kampala, Uganda; Uppsala Univ, Dept of Earth Sci, Centre of Natural hazards and Disaster Sci, Sweden; Lund Univ, Dept of Phys Geog & Ecosyst Sci, Lund, Sweden; Gulu Univ, Dept of Geog, Gulu, Uganda.
    Albrecht, Frederike
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section, Sektionen för krishantering och internationell samverkan.
    Bamutaze, Yazidhi
    Makerere Univ, Dept of Geog, Geo-Informat and Climat Sci, Kampala, Uganda.
    Mukwaya, Paul Isolo
    Makerere Univ, Dept of Geog, Geo-Informat and Climat Sci, Kampala, Uganda.
    Nakileza, Bob
    Makerere Univ, Dept of Geog, Geo-Informat and Climat Sci, Kampala, Uganda.
    Pilesjö, Petter
    Perceptions of resilience to climate-induced disasters in Mbale municipality in UgandaIn: Environmental Hazards: Human and Policy Dimensions, ISSN 1747-7891, E-ISSN 1878-0059Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resilience has been raised as a core task within disaster risk reduction frameworks, yet it remains difficult to implement these global ideas in local communities. This study used Community Based Resilience Analysis Approach to investigate the components that are perceived as important in resilience and the extent to which these components have been achieved. It explored the trend of resilience and beneficial interventions for building resilience as perceived by interviewed participants in Mbale Municipality in Eastern Uganda. The study results indicate that access to education, healthcare, employment, peace and security were the most important components of resilience. Respondents perceived to have progressed in accessing credit, building productive farms and sustaining peace and security by July 2017. However, they assessed a lack of diverse income-generating activities, access to insurance, food security, employment and health care. Moreover, the study showed that respondents from marginalised parts of the municipality experienced decreasing resilience while respondents in other divisions had increased resilience. These results provide context-specific components of resilience by the local people. This can inform the formulation of resilience indices and bear relevance for policy-makers and practitioners to understand areas to invest more resources to achieve resilience.

  • 5.
    Oriangi, George
    et al.
    Department of Geography, Geo-Informatics, and Climatic Sciences, Makerere University, Uganda; Department of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science, Lund University, Sweden; Department of Geography, Gulu University, Uganda.
    Albrecht, Frederike
    Department of Earth Sciences, Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Di Baldassarre, Giuliano
    Department of Earth Sciences, Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Bamutaze, Yazidhi
    Department of Geography, Geo-Informatics, and Climatic Sciences, Makerere University, Uganda.
    Mukwaya, Paul Isolo
    Department of Geography, Geo-Informatics, and Climatic Sciences, Makerere University, Uganda.
    Ardö, Jonas
    Department of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science, Lund University, Sweden.
    Pilesjö, Petter
    Department of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science, Lund University, Sweden.
    Household resilience to climate change hazards in Uganda2020In: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, ISSN 1756-8692, E-ISSN 1756-8706, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 59-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – As climate change shocks and stresses increasingly affect urban areas in developing countries, resilience is imperative for the purposes of preparation, recovery and adaptation. This study aims to investigate demographic characteristics and social networks that influence the household capacity to prepare, recover and adapt when faced with prolonged droughts or erratic rainfall events in Mbale municipality in Eastern Uganda.

    Design/methodology/approach – A cross-sectional research design was used to elicit subjective opinions. Previous studies indicate the importance of subjective approaches for measuring social resilience but their use has not been well explored in the context of quantifying urban resilience to climate change shocks and stresses. This study uses 389 structured household interviews to capture demographic characteristics, social networks and resilience capacities. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used for analysis.

    Findings – The ability of low-income households to meet their daily expenditure needs, household size, and networks with relatives and non government organizations (NGOs) were significant determinants of preparedness, recovery and adaptation to prolonged droughts or erratic rainfall events.

    Practical implications – The results imply that policymakers and practitioners have an important role vis-à-vis encouraging activities that boost the ability of households to meet their daily expenditure needs, promoting small household size and reinforcing social networks that enhance household resilience.

    Originality/value – Even the low-income households are substantially more likely to prepare for and recover from prolonged droughts or erratic rainfall events if they can meet their daily expenditure needs. This finding is noteworthy because the poorest in society are generally the most vulnerable to hazards.

  • 6.
    Ridolfi, Elena
    et al.
    Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden; Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden.
    Albrecht, Frederike
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section, Sektionen för krishantering och internationell samverkan. Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden; Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden.
    Di Baldassarre, Giuliano
    Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden; Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden.
    Exploring the role of risk perception in influencing flood losses over time2020In: Hydrological Sciences Journal, ISSN 0262-6667, E-ISSN 2150-3435, Vol. 65, no 1, p. 12-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What implications do societies’ risk perceptions have for flood losses? This study uses a stylized, socio-hydrological model to simulate the mutual feedbacks between human societies and flood events. It integrates hydrological modelling with cultural theory and proposes four ideal types of society that reflect existing dominant risk perception and management: risk neglecting, risk monitoring, risk downplaying and risk controlling societies. We explore the consequent trajectories of flood risk generated by the interactions between floods and people for these ideal types of society over time. The results suggest that flood losses are substantially reduced when awareness-raising attitudes are promoted through inclusive, participatory approaches in the community. In contrast, societies that rely on top-down hierarchies and structural measures to protect settlements on floodplains may still suffer significant losses during extreme events. This study illustrates how predictions formed through social science theories can be applied and tested in hydrological modelling.

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