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  • 1.
    Ekman, Lisa
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Division of Strategy.
    A Duty to Save, Support, or Serve the Locals?: Swedish Military Members’ Notions of Military Duty in the FieldManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The notion of military duty is becoming increasingly complex in contemporary global security dynamics. Increasing regional instability has renewed focus on national security concerns and the reinstatement of conscription in several European states, nevertheless most European armed forces mainly conduct military operations elsewhere with a principal focus on addressing ‘population-oriented’ security concerns of host states. This dual nature of military duty raises a number of questions, including what contemporary understanding of duty guides the decision-making and behavior of military professionals. The article investigates how population-oriented objectives and responsibilities shape notions of military duty in the context of international military operations. Based on interviews with Swedish military personnel with experiences of international deployment, the article identifies a number of empirical tensions between general notions of military duty and the individual sense of responsibility and obligation in the field.

  • 2.
    Ekman, Lisa
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Division of Strategy.
    Fighting for Strangers?: Military Duty in Contemporary War2017In: Leadership in Extreme Situations / [ed] Michael Holenweger, Michael Karl Jager, and Franz Kernic, Springer, 2017, p. 167-180Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter explores the concept of military duty in the context of contemporary war. It focuses on the recent developments in the normative and strategic frameworks of Western military operations, which emphasize that mission effectiveness is largely dependent on the security and wellbeing of the local population. This has seemingly stretched the traditional notion of military duty, which is to master and apply organized military force to achieve political objectives and defeat the enemy on the battlefield. Based on empirical insights from the U.S. military and its recent missions in Iraq and Afghanistan, the chapter argues that this development has created tensions between political and military understandings of duty, as well as between organizational and individual notions of duty within the U.S. military. Conflicting notions of military duty hold important policy implications to both domestic civil-military relations and U.S. military power abroad because they challenge the integrity of political objectives and threaten military cohesion and unity of effort with regard to the management of local populations during war.

  • 3.
    Ekman, Lisa
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Division of Strategy.
    Helping Strangers: The Role of the Local Population in Swedish Military Personnel’s Sense of DutyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Ekman, Lisa
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Division of Strategy.
    Local Ties that Bind?: Exploring Noncombat Contact and Understandings of Military Duty in AfghanistanManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Ekman, Lisa
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Division of Strategy.
    Local Ties that Bind?: Exploring Noncombat Contact and Understandings of Military Duty in AfghanistanManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary ‘population -oriented’ military intervention and the objectives of protecting, supporting, and fighting alongside host-nation authorities and populations pose new challenges to Western armed forces’ traditionally combat-oriented understanding of duty. The article argues that military personnel who engage in unarmed and non-threatening interaction–noncombat contact–with host citizens are more likely to develop a stronger sense of duty–perceived obligations–toward the host-nation population. Interviews with U.S. Army officers with experiences from Afghanistan show that noncombat contact with Afghan citizens led to increased willingness to safeguard the interests and well-being of the Afghan population and adapt the mission accordingly.

  • 6.
    Ekman, Lisa
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Division of Strategy.
    Local Ties that Bind?: Exploring U.S. Military Duty toward Local Citizens in AfghanistanManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Ekman, Lisa
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Division of Strategy.
    Florian, Krampe
    SIPRI.
    Post-War Legitimacy: A Framework on Relational Agency in PeacebuildingManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Ekman, Lisa
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Division of Strategy.
    Krampe, Florian
    Stockholm International Peace Research Institute .
    Post-war Legitimacy: A Framework of Relational Agency in PeacebuildingManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There is increasing interest in the role of legitimacy in post-war societies as an indicator of social and political stability. In this chapter we propose an analytical framework that examines post-war peacebuilding processes by focusing on two central concepts: legitimacy and actors. We understand peacebuilding as rooted in the relationship between politics, namely the state in particular, and the wider society. Peacebuilding is the process wherein the structural-normative setup of the post-war state vis-à-vis society is renegotiated through various interactions between domestic state and non-state actors with, or without, the involvement of international or other external actors. The degrees to which this domestic relationship will be sustainable and peaceful is largely contingent on whether society finds it legitimate, or not. This understanding of legitimacy is important because it recognizes the importance of relational agency, which neither rejects the role and existence of the state, nor understates the agency of society in the process of rebuilding countries after internal armed conflict. Applying the framework on empirical insights from Afghanistan and Nepal, this chapter highlights the importance of relational agency and the perceived legitimacy of the domestic state-society relationship.

  • 9.
    Ekman, Lisa
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Division of Strategy.
    Nilsson, Sofia
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Ledarskapscentrum.
    Learning Duty: Military Duty in Swedish Military Training and EducationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Nilsson, Sofia
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Ledarskapscentrum.
    Ekman, Lisa
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Division of Strategy.
    Psychological mechanisms behind military personnels sense of duty in contemporary warfareManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
1 - 10 of 10
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