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  • 1.
    Dinniss, Heather A. Harrison
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), International Law Centre.
    'Armed Attack' and Article 51 of the UN Charter2013In: Modern law review, ISSN 0026-7961, E-ISSN 1468-2230, Vol. 76, no 1, p. 187-190Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Harrison Dinniss, Heather
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), International Law Centre.
    Cyber Operations in Outer Space2017In: Outer Space Law: Legal Policy and Practice / [ed] Yanal Abdul Failat and Anel Ferreira-Snyman, Woking, Surrey: Globe Law and Business , 2017, p. 323-333Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Harrison Dinniss, Heather
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), International Law Centre.
    Cyber Warfare and the Laws of War2012 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The information revolution has transformed both modern societies and the way in which they conduct warfare. Cyber Warfare and the Laws of War analyses the status of computer network attacks in international law and examines their treatment under the laws of armed conflict. The first part of the book deals with the resort to force by states and discusses the threshold issues of force and armed attack by examining the permitted responses against such attacks. The second part offers a comprehensive analysis of the applicability of international humanitarian law to computer network attacks. By examining the legal framework regulating these attacks, Heather Harrison Dinniss addresses the issues associated with this method of attack in terms of the current law and explores the underlying debates which are shaping the modern laws applicable in armed conflict.

  • 4.
    Harrison Dinniss, Heather
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Centre for International and Operational Law.
    Legal Aspects of Human Enhancement Technologies2019In: New Technologies and the Law in War and Peace / [ed] Boothby, William H., Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019, 1, p. 230-257Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Chapter 8 continues the exploration of issues raised by human enhancement technologies. Building on the discussion in the previous chapter, this contribution begins by examining the question of whether and under what circumstances we might consider that individuals who enhance their natural abilities might be considered something other than human – and what that might mean for their treatment under the law.  Biochemical enhancement, cybernetic technologies such as brain machine interfaces and advances in prosthetic technologies all have the capacity to alter and augment the human experience and raise interesting challenges for the law. This chapter looks specifically at the application of the laws of armed conflict (international humanitarian law) in relation to these techniques and the effects of human rights law in an age of enhanced humans – whether they be civilian or military personnel. Clear synergies also exist with the discussions in Chapter 13 on brain-machine interfaces. Attention is given in the final section to questions as to the adequacy of the current rights frameworks and as to the distinction between national and international systems.

  • 5.
    Harrison Dinniss, Heather
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), International Law Centre.
    Military Human Enhancement: Legal aspects of the use of human enhancement technologies by the armed forces2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The current focus on an ever-increasing sophistication of weapons systems usually overlooks efforts of states to enhance the physical and mental capabilities of human soldiers. While such techniques and technologies have a long history (e.g. the use of drugs and alcohol in order to overcome fear and fatigue; the use of night-vision goggles etc.), they have attained a new quality. For instance, certain armed forces are introducing wearable robotics suit (Powered exoskeletons). Furthermore, the development of military applications of brain-computer interfaces continues, which would allow for direct communication between a human brain and a computer – and eventually vice-versa. These technologies raise a number of pertinent international legal issues, such as: What are the potential consequences for compliance with the rules and principles of the law of armed conflict? What implications may such technologies have for the accountability of states and individuals? And what would the use of such technologies mean for the human rights of the human soldier?

  • 6.
    Harrison Dinniss, Heather
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), International Law Centre.
    Participants in Conflict: Cyber warriors, patriotic hackers and the laws of war2013In: International Humanitarian Law and the Changing Technology of War / [ed] Dan Saxon, Leiden:Boston: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 2013, p. 251-278Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Harrison Dinniss, Heather
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), International Law Centre.
    The Nature of Objects: Targeting networks and the challenge of defining cyber military objectives2015In: Israel Law Review, ISSN 0021-2237, E-ISSN 2047-9336, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cyber warfare and the advent of computer network operations have forced us to look again at the concept of the military objective. The definition set out in Article 52(2) of Additional Protocol I – that an object must by its nature, location, purpose or use, make an effective contribution to military action – is accepted as customary international law; its application in the cyber context, however, raises a number of issues which are examined in this article. First, the question of whether data may constitute a military objective is discussed. In particular, the issue of whether the requirement that the definition applies to ‘objects’ requires that the purported target must have tangible or material form. The article argues on the basis of both textual and contextual analysis that this is not required, but it contends that it may prove to be useful to differentiate between operational- and content-level data. The second part of the article examines the qualifying contribution of military objectives such as their nature, location, purpose or use, and questions whether network location rather than geographical location may be used as a qualifying criterion in the cyber context. The final part of the article addresses the question of whether the particular ability of cyber operations to effect results at increasingly precise levels of specificity places an obligation on a party to an armed conflict to define military objectives at their smallest possible formulation – that is, a small piece of code or component rather than the computer or system itself. Such a requirement would have significant implications for the cyber context where much of the infrastructure is dual use, but the distinction between civilian objects and military objectives is a binary classification.

  • 8.
    Harrison Dinniss, Heather
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), International Law Centre.
    The regulation of cyber warfare under the jus in bello2015In: Cyber Warfare: A Multidisciplinary Analysis / [ed] James A. Green, Abingdon, Oxon; New York, NY: Routledge, 2015, 1, p. 125-159Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter discusses the legal issues raised by the use of cyber operations during armed conflict.

    Although none of the laws governing the conduct of hostilities address cyber operations explicitly, the laws are framed in general terms that may be interpreted to incorporate technological advances. This chapter thus explores the way in which those laws may be adapted and applied.

    The chapter first considers the general applicability of the jus in bello to cyber operations.  It then turns to the crucial principle of distinction, and assesses how this is to be applied in the cyber context.  In particular, this section of the chapter assesses what may be targeted i.e., what constitutes a ‘military objective’, the issue of ‘dual use’ objects in the cyber context and the prohibition on indiscriminate attacks.  The chapter then considers the various ways in which the principle of precaution may be relevant to cyber-attacks.  It also provides an examination of a number of jus in bello requirements for measures of special protection, and assesses how these rules are relevant to cyber warfare.  The final section turns to IHL’s restrictions on the ‘means and methods’ of warfare, including – but not limited to – the law of weaponry.

  • 9.
    Harrison Dinniss, Heather
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Centre for International and Operational Law.
    The Threat of Cyber Terrorism and What International Law Should (Try To) Do about It2018In: Georgetown journal of international affairs, ISSN 1550-5200, E-ISSN 1802-1115, Vol. 19, no Fall, p. 43-50Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Harrison Dinniss, Heather
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), International Law Centre.
    Kleffner, Jann
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), International Law Centre.
    Soldier 2.0: Military Human Enhancement and International Law2016In: International Law Studies, ISSN 2375-2831, Vol. 92, p. 432-482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advances in technologies that could endow humans with physical or mental abilities that go beyond the statistically normal level of functioning are occurring at an incredible pace. The use of these human enhancement technologies by the military, for instance in the spheres of biotechnology, cybernetics and prosthetics, raise a number of questions under the international legal frameworks governing military technology, namely the law of armed conflict and human rights law. The article examines these frameworks with a focus on weapons law, the law pertaining to the detention of and by “enhanced individuals,” the human rights of those individuals and their responsibility for the actions they take while under the influence of enhancements.

  • 11.
    Kleffner, Jann K.
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), International Law Centre.
    Appelgren, Jessica
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), International Law Centre.
    Harrison Dinniss, Heather
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), International Law Centre.
    Frau, Robert
    Viadrina University Frankfurt/Oder.
    Unmanned Systems: Legal Aspects of the Use of Unmanned Systems in the Law of Armed Conflict and Human Rights Law2012Report (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Kleffner, Jann K.
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Strategiavdelningen med folkrättscentrum.
    Harrison Dinniss, Heather
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Strategiavdelningen med folkrättscentrum.
    Keeping the CyberPeace: International Legal Aspects of Cyber Activities in Peace Operations2013In: International Law Studies, ISSN 2375-2831, Vol. 89, p. 512-535Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 12 of 12
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