Change search
Refine search result
123 1 - 50 of 144
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Amorim, Joni A.
    et al.
    University of Skövde.
    Hendrix, Maurice
    Coventry University.
    Andler, Sten F.
    University of Skövde.
    Gustavsson, Per M.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Gamified Training for Cyber Defence: Methods and Automated Tools for Situation and Threat Assessment2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Amorim, Joni A.
    et al.
    University of Skövde.
    Hendrix, Maurice
    Coventry University.
    Andler, Sten F.
    University of Skövde.
    Llinas, James
    State University of New York at Buffalo.
    Gustavsson, Per M.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Brodin, Martin
    Actea Consulting.
    Cyber Security Training Perspectives2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Amorim, Joni A.
    et al.
    University of Skövde.
    Matos, Carlos
    Instruction Center for Operations on Law and Order Assurance - CIOpGLO, Exército Brasileiro.
    Cuperschmid, Ana R. M.
    University of Campinas.
    Gustavsson, Per M.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Pozzer, Cesar T.
    Universidade Federal de Santa Maria.
    Augmented Reality and Mixed Reality Technologies: Enhancing Training and Mission Preparation with Simulations2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Instruction Centre for Operations on Law and Order Assurance (CIOpGLO) is a Brazilian Army facility created in March 2005 in Campinas, Brazil. The mission of this centre involves the offering of training in different perspectives, which includes the preparation of soldiers to enter in slums areas in Rio de Janeiro and other cities to arrest criminals, whenever a federal intervention is required. This centre is involved in training to guarantee law and order and, at the same time, prepare officers and soldiers for interventions even in urban areas. To allow such training, this facility counts with physical built sites to allow soldiers to train how to get inside houses, how to shoot at short ranges (from 0 to 30 meters), how to move and shelter while going up in a hill with many houses and corridors on the way, and so on. The Brazilian Army, in the last few years, started operating in slums like the ones of the "Alemão" and the "Penha" complex in Rio de Janeiro. The Army is also participating in operations out of Brazil in countries like Haiti. In situations like this, the armed forces take over the coordination of public security temporarily to recover the control of certain areas. Since the armed forces were not originally created to act in situations like this, there is a need to train all military stakeholders involved so that the operations are successful. Additionally, major events like the Confederations Cup, the World Cup in 2014 and the Olympics in 2016, generate additional demands for the armed forces, which are likely to be called to act at specific times. Moreover, it is noteworthy that there is a growing trend in which conflicts around the world occur, more than ever, inside the cities, where civilians take great risk and suffer many casualties, something called as “collateral damage” of the urban warfare. Recent examples include Afghanistan and Iraq. In this work, the preparation of soldiers at CIOpGLO is discussed while the possibility of using new approaches based on augmented reality and mixed reality technologies are considered. As a way to enhance training and mission preparation with simulations, this research focus on augmented reality (AR) supported by head-mounted displays (HMDs). HDMs may have many shapes, which include pairs of glasses with lenses that present AR with superposed images, enabling its wearer a total immersion in the simulation. The method used in this work involves a literature review on AR and HMDs, assessment of training needs at the Brazilian Army and an evaluation of emerging technologies from the ICT sector. The technologies to be considered are the HDMs, in this specific case the available programming languages, software and hardware from suppliers of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) and military off-the-shelf (MOTS). The main contribution of this work is the comparative study of the main solutions for HDM. This study represents an essential step for concept development and for the experimentation to exploit and evaluate the use of simulations. The research presented suggests that the approach is effective and that future work should be on both development of new applications and its evaluation in real training sets in Brazil.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Isabell
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Dynamisk operationsvärdering2016In: Operativ ledning: Slutrapport 2013-2015 / [ed] Isabell Andersson, Stockholm: Försvarshögskolan (FHS), 2016Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Andersson, Isabell
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Operations assessment: focus on reality rather than the plan2016In: 21st International Command and Control Reserach and Technology Symposium (ICCRTS): C2 in a Complex Connected Battlespace, International Command and Control Institute , 2016, Vol. Topic 2, article id 056Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since no plan survives contact with reality, during the execution of a military operation it might be necessary to re-plan the operation. In order to decide whether, and when, re-planning should be initiated a feedback process is needed that provides the commander with information about the progress of the operation, and an assessment of whether the operation is leading towards the overarching goals or not. The operations assessment process is part of such a feedback process.

    The current method (in e.g. NATO) operations assessment is focused on the accomplishment of planned actions and on the effects in the operational environment system. A data collection plan is established during development of the operational plan which specifies which and how data should be collected. Thus the “questions” the operations assessment process poses towards the environment are tightly connected to critical elements of the operational plan.

    If the plan, however, starts to become obsolete due to unforeseen changes in the operational environment, there might be a risk that the assessment process, grounded in the plan, neglects information that is critical for decisions about re-planning. This paper suggests an alternative approach to operations assessment that is based on an idea of separating the operations assessment plan from the operational plan. Such a separation would focus the assessment process on the evolving operational environment, thus reducing the risk that unanticipated threats, or opportunities, will be overlooked and re-planning is overdue.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Isabell
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Operativ ledning: Slutrapport 2013-20152016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Andersson, Isabell
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Kuylenstierna, Jan
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Utvärdering av MSB Operativt beslutsstöd, ver 0.7: - Upplevd användbarhet i ett aktörsinternt scenario med oerfarna användare - Kompatibilitet med Försvarsmaktens Svensk planerings- och ledningsmetod2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Som komplement till Gemensamma grunder för samverkan och ledning vid samhällsstörningar har MSB tagit fram ett beslutsstöd, Operativt beslutsstöd, som är tänkt att hjälpa beslutsfattare att besluta hur resurser ska prioriteras vid samhällsstörningar. Beslutsstödet ska kunna användas av alla aktörer som bidrar till att hantera samhällsstörningar, både aktörsgemensamt och aktörsinternt, och är tänkt att kunna användas med eller utan kvalificerad operativ vana. Beslutsstödet är av typen checklista och består av fem huvudsteg, med tillhörande delfrågor. Rapporten redovisar en utvärdering av ett utkast till beslutsstödet (Operativt beslutsstöd, UTKAST version 0.7) med avseende på beslutsstödets lättillgänglighet och användbarhet, samt med avseende på beslutsstödets kompatibilitet med Försvarsmaktens motsvarighet. Rapporten riktar sig främst till de som deltar i utvecklingen av beslutsstödet.

    Beslutsstödets lättillgänglighet och användbarhet undersöktes genom att användare utan operativ vana eller utbildning i att använda stödet nyttjade stödet för att fatta beslut om prioriteringar i ett fiktivt scenario. Elva grupper om två eller tre studenter deltog i undersökningen. Deltagarna fick ange om de använde alla steg i stödet för att lösa uppgiften eller om de avvek från stödet i något fall och då om orsaken till detta. De skattade även olika aspekter av beslutsprocessen. Resultaten tyder på att beslutsstödet var såväl användbart som lättillgängligt.

    Beslutsstödets kompatibilitet med Försvarsmaktens motsvarighet på operativ nivå, Svensk planerings- och ledningsmetod (SPL) undersöktes genom semistrukturerade intervjuer med fyra officerare med omfattande kunskap om SPL. Resultaten tyder på att beslutsstödet är kompatibelt med SPL.

    Förutom dessa huvudresultat framkom ett antal synpunkter och förbättringsförlag rörande beslutsstödet i dess nuvarande form. 

  • 8.
    Andersson, Isabell
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Spak, Ulrik
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Krav och designkriterier gällande framtida ledningssystem2016Report (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Andersson, Jonas
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, Military-Technology Division.
    Astell, Magnus
    Axberg, Stefan
    Brehmer, Berndt
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Brynielsson, Joel
    Hagstedt, Daniel S
    Nylander, Martin
    Reberg, Michael
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, Military-Technology Division.
    Sivertun, Åke
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, Military-Technology Division.
    Lärobok i Militärteknik, vol. 3: Teknik till stöd för ledning2009Book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Baroutsi, Nicoletta
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Observing Sensemaking in C2: Performance Assessment in Multi-Organizational Crisis Response2016In: Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management / [ed] Andrea H. Tapia, Pedro Antunes, Victor A. Bañuls, Kathleen Moore & João Porto de Albuquerque, ISCRAM, 2016, Vol. Command and Control Studies, article id 1385Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A crisis can involve multiple organizations during high pressure events, and it is up to the Command & Control (C2) unit to provide direction and coordination for the response (Brehmer, 2006). Hard as this problem is, there is still no ‘one-solution’. Dissimilar organizations with very different methods seem to be able to master the problem. This paper presents the initial development of a new evaluation method for C2 in the context of multi-organizational crisis response. The data is collected at an emergency water exercise series conducted in several cities in Sweden. Each exercise involves multiple agencies and organizations, with up to 76 participants from 15 unique organizations/units. The analysis is brief, but presents the possibility of observing Sensemaking as it unfolds, and that generic behavioral patterns can be found. The existence of generic and observable behavior patterns suggests the possibility of assessing, and maybe even quantifying, Sensemaking performance in C2.

  • 11.
    Baroutsi, Nicoletta
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division. Linköping University.
    Berggren, Peter
    FOI.
    Nählinder, Staffan
    Linköping University.
    Granlund, Rego
    Santa Anna IT Research Institute, Sweden.
    Turcotte, Isabelle
    Laval University, Canada.
    Tremblay, Sébastien
    Laval University, Canada.
    Assessing development of team training2014In: ISCRAM 2014 Conference Proceedings. Book of Papers / [ed] Starr Roxanne Hiltz, Mark S. Pfaff, Linda Plotnick, Patrick C. Shih, The Pennsylvania State University, USA , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Berggren, Peter
    et al.
    Department of Computer and Information Science, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Johansson, Björn J E
    Swedish Defence Research Agency, Information and Aeronautical Systems, Linköping, Sweden.
    Baroutsi, Nicoletta
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Assessing the quality of Shared Priorities in teams using content analysis in a microworld experiment2017In: Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science, ISSN 1463-922X, E-ISSN 1464-536X, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 128-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective, easy to use, and easy to comprehend assessment methods for measuring shared understanding in teams are hard to find. This paper describes an experiment where a measure called Shared Priorities, which is based on ranking of self-generated strategic items, is assessed. Trained teams were compared to non-trained teams in a dynamic problem-solving task. The maturity of the participating teams was also assessed using a content analysis measure. The Shared Priorities measure was used alongside other well-documented measures of team awareness based on self-rating. Results show that the Shared Priorities measure correlates with task performance and could also distinguish between trained and non-trained teams. However, the Shared Priorities measure did not correlate with the other team measures (cf. CARS – Crew Awareness Rating Scale – and DATMA – Distributed Assessment of Team Mutual Awareness), suggesting that it captures a different quality of teamwork than the self-rating measures. Further, the Shared Priorities measure was found to be easily administered.

  • 13.
    Berggren, Peter
    et al.
    FOI.
    Johansson, Björn JE
    FOI.
    Baroutsi, Nicoletta
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Dahlbäck, Nils
    Department of Computer and Information Science, Linköping University.
    The shared priorities measure as a way of assessing team strategic awareness: a bridge between self-assessment and the deep blue sea of field recordings2014In: Proceedings of the 2014 European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics, ACM Digital Library, 2014, p. 13-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective, easy to use, easy to comprehend, high face-validity assessment methods for measuring shared awareness in teams are hard to find. This paper describes an experiment where a new measure called Shared Priorities, which is based on ranking of self-generated strategic items, is tested. Trained teams were compared to non-trained teams in a dynamic problem-solving task in terms of performance and shared awareness. The shared priorities measure was used alongside other, well-documented measures of team awareness based on self-rating. The results show that the Shared Priorities measure correlate with performance and could also distinguish between trained and non-trained teams. However, the Shared Priorities measure did not correlate with the other team measures, suggesting that it captures a different quality of team work than the self-rating measures. Further, the shared priorities measure was found to be easily administered and gained a high user acceptance.

  • 14.
    Berggren, Peter
    et al.
    FOI.
    Johansson, Björn JE
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Baroutsi, Nicoletta
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Turcotte, Isabelle
    Laval University, Canada.
    Tremblay, Sébastien
    Laval University, Canada.
    Assessing team focused behaviors in emergency response teams using the shared priorities measure2014In: Proceedings of the 11th International ISCRAM Conference / [ed] S.R. Hiltz, M.S. Pfaff, L. Plotnick, and P.C. Shih, Pennsylvania, USA: ISCRAM , 2014, p. 130-134Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this work in progress paper is to report on the method development of the Shared Prioritiesmeasure to include content analysis, as a way of gaining a deeper understanding of team work incrisis/emergency response. An experiment is reported where the performance of six trained teams is comparedwith the performance of six non-trained teams. The experiment was performed using an emergency responsemicroworld simulation with a forest fire scenario. Dependent measures were simulation performance, the CrewAwareness Rating Scale (CARS), and content analysis. Trained teams performed better and scored higher onmeasures of team behaviors.

  • 15.
    Berggren, Peter
    et al.
    FOI.
    Johansson, Björn JE
    FOI.
    Svensson, Erland
    Baroutsi, Nicoletta
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Dahlbäck, Nils
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Statistical modelling of team training in a microworld study2014In: Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, Sage Publications, 2014, p. 894-898Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A command and control environment is a dynamic and complex setting with complicated technical systems where teams of operators interact to reach shared goals. This study presents an experiment in which we, by means of Structural Equation Modeling (SEM), explain the relations between basic concepts of command and control environments: mental workload, frustration, situational awareness, and performance. This paper reports a LISREL analysis of the Baroutsi, Berggren, Nählinder, & Johansson (2013) data. From that data, a new latent variable “Frustration” emerges, which now can be included in the model.

  • 16.
    Bhatt, Parth
    et al.
    Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica, Brasilien.
    Yano, Edgar Toshiro
    Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica, Brasilien.
    Amorim, Joni
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Gustavsson, Per
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division. George Mason University, USA.
    A Cyber Security Situational Awareness Framework to Track and Project Multistage Cyber Attacks2014In: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Cyber Warfare & Security, Academic Conferences Limited, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Bhatt, Parth
    et al.
    Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica, Brasilien.
    Yano, Edgar Toshiro
    Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica, Brasilien.
    Gustavsson, Per
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Towards a Framework to Detect Multi-Stage Advanced Persistent Threats Attacks2014In: Service Oriented System Engineering (SOSE), 2014 IEEE 8th International Symposium, IEEE Computer Society, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Detecting and defending against Multi-Stage Advanced Persistent Threats (APT) Attacks is a challenge for mechanisms that are static in its nature and are based on blacklisting and malware signature techniques. Blacklists and malware signatures are designed to detect known attacks. But multi-stage attacks are dynamic, conducted in parallel and use several attack paths and can be conducted in multi-year campaigns, in order to reach the desired effect. In this paper the design principles of a framework are presented that model Multi-Stage Attacks in a way that both describes the attack methods as well as the anticipated effects of attacks. The foundation to model behaviors is by the combination of the Intrusion Kill-Chain attack model and defense patterns (i.e. a hypothesis based approach of known patterns). The implementation of the framework is made by using Apache Hadoop with a logic layer that supports the evaluation of a hypothesis.

  • 18.
    Brehmer, Berndt
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Command and Control Research is a ”Science of the Artificial”2008In: Proceedings of the 13th International Command and Control Research and Technology Symposium (13th ICCRTS), 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Brehmer, Berndt
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Command Without Commanders2009In: Proceedings of the 14th International Command and Control Research and Technology Symposium, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Brehmer, Berndt
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    From Function to Form in the Design of C2 Systems2009In: Proceedings of the 14th International Command and Control Research and Technology Symposium, Washington, D.C, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Brehmer, Berndt
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Harmony Rather than Unity:  A Command Concept for Complex Endeavours2011In: 16th International Command and Control Research and Technology Symposia (ICCRTS): Collective C2 in Multinational Civil-Military Operations / [ed] CCRP, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses concepts of command for complex endeavors. The traditional concepts of Unity of Command and Unity of Effort are found wanting, the former because there is no single individual in command of a complex endeavor, the latter because there is often no time to develop the comprehensive plan required, and if there is time, it is nevertheless difficult because different organizations have different planning methods and different planning cultures. A new command concept, based on our experience from studies of peace support operations is proposed. It is called Harmony of Efforts and it is a C2 concept for complex endeavors that involve a number of organizations, each of which does what it usually does, and for which there is no one commander with authority to enforce unity of command or unity of effort. Under these circumstances, Harmony of Efforts is all that one can hope for. The command concept of Harmony of Efforts specifies the spirit in which C2 issues should be approached, which is cooperation, the method to be used, which is negotiation, and the substance of C2, i.e., what C2 can usefully be concerned with in complex endeavors, which is the management of interfaces between organizations.

  • 22.
    Brehmer, Berndt
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Hur man åstadkommer en snabbare Ooda-loop: Överste Boyds syn på ledning2008In: Kungl Krigsvetenskapsakademiens Handlingar och Tidskrift, ISSN 0023-5369, no 4, p. 42-68Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Brehmer, Berndt
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Insatsledning: ledningsvetenskap hjälper dig att peka åt rätt håll2013Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Ämnet ledningsvetenskap har utvecklats för att bidra till utvecklingen av nya och bättre ledningssystem för militära och civila insatser. En viktig orsak till att ämnet kom till var de nya möjligheter inom ledningsområdet som blev följden av utvecklingen inom informationsteknologin. Ledningsvetenskap är en designvetenkap och begreppet designvenskap och vad som utmärker en sådan vetenskap till skillnad från en natur-, samhälls- eller beteendevetenskap diskuteras i boken. Boken är en lägesrapport. Den beskriver hur långt utvecklingen inom ämnet har hunnit under dess första femton år vid Försvarshögskolan. Syftet med boken är främst att ge en teoretisk grund för ämnet. Den beskriver grundläggande problem inom ledning av insatser, de lösningar dessa problem har fått och de kostnader som är förknippade med lösningarna. Diskussionen sker utifrån det som är ledningsvetenskapens speciella perspektiv, nämligen informationsperspektivet: vilken information som finns eller som kan (eller inte kan) göras tillgänglig och hur tillgänglig information används för att åstadkomma den inriktning och samordning som är ledningsfunktionens produkt i insatsen Boken ger också olika begrepp som skall göra det möjligt att diskutera ledning på ett ordnat sätt. Boken är skriven inte bara för att introducera ämnet utan också för att kunna tjäna som en första lärobok i ledningsvetenskap som ämnet utvecklats vid Försvarshögskolan.

  • 24.
    Brehmer, Berndt
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Vad kan man åstadkomma med ledning när man möter en överlägsen fiende?2016In: Operativ ledning: Slutrapport 2013-2015 / [ed] Isabell Andersson, Stockholm: Försvarshögskolan (FHS), 2016Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Brehmer, Berndt
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Vad är ledningsvetenskap?2008In: Kungl Krigsvetenskapsakademiens Handlingar och Tidskrift, ISSN 0023-5369, no 1, p. 43-72Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Brehmer, Berndt
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Kuylenstierna, Jan
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Toward an understanding of the commander´s "coup d´oeil"2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Brehmer, Berndt
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Kuylenstierna, Jan
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Rydmark, Joacim
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Olsson, Sten-Olof
    Försvarsmakten, Markstridsskolan.
    Towards Understanding the Commander´s "Coup d´Oeil". Part 22011In: 16th International Command and Control Research and Technology Symposia (ICCRTS).: Collective C2 in Multinational Civil-Military Operations, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the second paper in a series where we try to understand what Clausewitz called the commander’s “coup d’oeil”, i.e., the ability to understand the situation on the battle field at a glance. We employ a standard paradigm from research on expertise where participants study a scenario and then reproduce it from memory. Last year we reported results consistent with other results from studies of expertise, viz., that experts recall meaningful scenarios better than meaningless scenarios whereas novices recall both types of scenarios equally badly. This year, we report four follow-up experiments. The first two study ex-perts’ and novices’ recall of scenarios after having seen how the scenario de-veloped over time and we do so under two conditions, one where the scenario develops violating constraints on how military units should move and one where they do not in an attempt to distinguish between two possible explana-tions for last year’s results: The constraints hypothesis and the pattern match-ing hypothesis. The results show that both experts perform better than novices but that both groups recall scenarios where the development did not violate constraints better than scenarios where the development violated constraints. We interpret these results as support for the constraints hypothesis. In Experi-ments 2 and 3 we vary the time allowed for inspecting static scenarios on the interpretation of these scenarios with both expert and novice participants. The results show that a short time for inspection affects the interpretation by novic-es to a greater extent than it affects the interpretation by experts, as was pre-dicted by Clausewitz. We interpret this to mean that novices and experts achieve their understanding of a military scenario in different ways.

  • 28.
    Christensson, Anders
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Instruction sets to use and test a transformation towards an agreed end non-failing state2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Christensson, S. Anders
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Representations for military decision making2015In: 2015 Third World Conference on Complex Systems (WCCS) / [ed] Mohamed Essaaidi, Mohamed Nemiche, Maroccan, 2015, p. 52-52Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Present--‐day warfare often involves planning and execution of operations in complex environments. In order to support military decision making in such environments I argue that the military situation must be represented by six categories of representations. In current practice only two categories are employed. The six categories should be linked to representations of the operational plan and the planning process. By combining the different categories of representations, military decision makers will gain a better understanding of operational areas that hold complex system behaviour.

  • 30.
    Christensson, S Anders
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    STRATMAS Slutrapport2009Report (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Colonese, Emilia
    et al.
    Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica, Brasilien.
    Parente de Oliveira, Jose
    Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica, Brasilien.
    Yano, Edgar
    Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica, Brasilien.
    Amorim, Joni
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Andler, Sten
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Gustavsson, Per
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Cyber Security for Middleware System Architectures2014In: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Cyber Warfare & Security, Academic Conferences Limited, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Edström, Håkan
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Division of Strategy.
    Josefsson, Anders
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Försvaret av Sverige: vem kan leda operationer... och vem bör?2016In: Kungl Krigsvetenskapsakademiens Handlingar och Tidskrift, ISSN 0023-5369, no 1, p. 67-86Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Ekman, Olof
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    National Perspectives in Multinational Headquarters: The Case of EUFOR Tchad/RCA2012In: Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, ISSN 0966-0879, E-ISSN 1468-5973, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 190-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies of the European Union crisis management capability argue for establishing a permanent Operations Headquarters (OHQ) instead of the temporary alternatives currently available. These studies picture temporary OHQs as slow starters hampered by multiple interests and a lack of common grounds. This paper corroborates these studies by reporting on the empirical findings of a year-long case study of the EUFORTchad/RCA OHQ. The combined results of observations, interviews, and surveys indicate that national perspectives not only existed in the OHQ, but were also asymmetric in the sense that staff members from France and Ireland nations displayed stronger national perspectives than staff members from other nations. However, the general trust between staff members seems to have been largely unaffected by this. The findings also indicate a process of familiarization spanning over several months. This paper argues that temporary multinational headquarters are likely to work around frictions and mature into well-functioning organization, but that this is a time-consuming process in which national parallel chains of command may remain. Prior training should prepare staff members for this. In addition, leading nations need to understand their strong visibility and to be careful not to dominate the day-to-day staff work.

  • 34.
    Frank, Anders
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division, Sektionen för krigsspel.
    Achieving Game Goals at All Costs?: The Effect of Reward Structures on Tactics Employed in Educational Military Wargaming2014In: FRONTIERS IN GAMING SIMULATION, 2014, p. 13-20Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A key motive in using gaming for educational purposes is to enhance user motivation and involvement to the subject matter. Within military education, games have always been utilized as a means to think clearly about military operations. However, some research results have shown that gaming, regardless of what the game is supposed to portray, is a meaningful activity in itself, and this can distract the learner away from the educational objective. Playing the game, then, becomes similar to competition, such as in sports where the objective is to only win the game. The player directs actions to achieving game goals even though some actions are inappropriate from a learning perspective. To shed light on the discrepancy between playing a game to win and playing a game to learn, we conducted an experiment on cadets playing an educational wargame. By varying the conditions of the game, playing with or without points, while still in line with the learning objective, we were interested to see what impact it had on the tactics employed by cadets. The results showed that adding reward structures, such as points, changed the outcome of the game, that is, groups playing with points played the game more aggressively and utilized the military units more extensively. These findings suggest that changes in the game design, although educationally relevant, may distract learners to be more oriented towards a lusory attitude, in which achieving the game goals becomes players' biggest concern.

  • 35.
    Frank, Anders
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Difficulties in maintaining theme focused frameworks in educational wargaming2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Frank, Anders
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division, Sektionen för krigsspel. KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Gamer mode: Identifying and managing unwanted behaviour in military educational wargaming2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Games are rule-governed systems at the same time as they are fiction, simulating or representing a real or an abstract world. This defining characteristic may create for different forms of tensions, that is, at different times players may focus on the rules, the fiction or on both during game play. In military education with games, this poses a problem when the learner becomes too focused on the rules, trying to win at any price rather than taking the representation and what it implies in terms of permissible behaviour seriously. In here we attempt to understand how participants in a wargaming situation act out this tension by studying the interaction between the player and the game in military tactical training.

    The results first of all confirm that there is a tension – there are occasions where players are mainly concerned with winning the wargame, disregarding what the theme is meant to represent. I propose the term gamer mode to refer to this player orientation: players in gamer mode have an extreme rule-focused interaction, meaning they behave rationally with respect to game rules but irrationally with respect to the portrayed real-life situation they are training for. Gamer mode can probably occur for many reasons. This thesis documents two contributing factors. The first concerns whenever the game does not match players’ expectation on mimicking warfare. In these situations players may find that the game breaks the fragile contract of upholding an accurate representation of warfare. The other factor that may lead to gamer mode are game design features such as explicit reward structures or victory conditions.

    To remedy the situation, the instructor can, in real-time, actively support players’ orientation towards the game and explain in-game events, keeping them on track. When gamer mode occur I argue that the conditions for learning are compromised as the gaming activity becomes its own learning subject, blurring and overshadowing the learning objective. Although the results suggest that gamer mode is mainly detrimental to learning I conclude that gamer mode is a natural way students will approach games and as such, needs to be dealt with by the instructor.

  • 37.
    Frank, Anders
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Gaming the Game: A Study of the Gamer Mode in Educational Wargaming2012In: Simulation & Gaming, ISSN 1046-8781, Vol. 43, p. 118-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A risk associated with the use of games in training and education is that players "game the game," instead of focusing on their learning goals. The term gamer mode is proposed to describe this attitude. A player with a gamer-mode attitude strives to achieve goals that are optimal for winning the game, but suboptimal with respect to educational objectives. In this study of cadets playing an educational wargame to learn ground warfare tactics, the author examined occurrences of gamer mode. The results show that gamer mode on and off emerged in all analyzed sessions. Cadets understanding of the wargame was different from what the instructors expected. This study discusses why it is important to avoid situations where the gamer mode emerges and also speculates on the sources that generate this attitude-the game itself, the educational setting, and the participants' previous experiences.

  • 38.
    Frank, Anders
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division, Sektionen för krigsspel. Försvarshögskolan. KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    The Instructor Role during Educational Wargaming2014In: THE SHIFT FROM TEACHING TO LEARNING: Individual, Collective and Organizational Learning through Gaming / [ed] Willy C. Kriz, Bielefeld: W. Bertelsmann Verlag , 2014, p. 66-79Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The instructor has a vital role in leading the debriefing discussion in game-based learning. The role during the gaming part is however not as clear. Some results suggest that the instructor should take an active and authoritative role, but results provide few clues on how to apply this to military wargaming. Wargaming is a two-sided game activity where both sides are assumed to learn from their play experience. Wargaming against a live opponent can however produce unwanted effects. One such effect is ‘gamer mode’ that is a result of an exaggerated willingness to win, which can be observed when the players, for instance, exploit the game rules in unrealistic manner. This paper investigates the main responsibilities or duties of the instructor to prevent gamer mode to occur and instead support the desired player-orientation toward the game. By reasoning on the main characteristic features of wargaming, to play the game and to learn from the experience, I conclude that the main duties of the instructor are to frame the game activity and to steer the learning process. This supports earlier results that the instructor should take an active part in the gaming process, yet needs to have the skills, knowledge, and authority to intervene in students’ game play. The findings are illustrated with excerpts from videotaped wargaming sessions at the Swedish National Defence College.

  • 39.
    Frank, Anders
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Unexpected game calculations in educational wargaming: Design flaw or beneficial to learning?2011In: Think Design Play, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes situations where learning games are not perceived by the player as being realistic. In educational wargaming this is seen when the game calculates battle-outcomes. Defined as unexpected game calculations, these incidents can cause players to adopt a Gamer Mode attitude, in which players reject the idea that the game accurately portrays warfare. In a study involving cadets playing a commercial strategic wargame as part of their course in war science, unexpected game calculations emerged and resulted in different user responses. Although user responses risked damaging the worth of learning from gaming, this paper argues that these incidents could enhance learning, as the cadets became interested and keen on finding rationales to why and how unexpected calculations occur.

  • 40.
    Granberg, Staffan
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division, Sektionen för krigsspel.
    Hulterström, Patrik
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för marina operationer (KV Marin).
    Ecological Psychology: A Framework for Wargame Design2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Gustavsson, Per M.
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Rocha de Oliveira, Leonardo
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul.
    Lindergårdh, Lars
    Combitech.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Combitech.
    Learning Priorities and the Role of Computer-Based Training and Simulation on Military Supply Chain Logistics2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Military training involves activities that range from combat operations to strategic decisions on how to locate and transport personal and supplies, such as food, ammunition, fuel and medical equipment. Despite of the fact that most military training is difficult to acquire from real situations, the skills required for learning from combat training technology are different from those required for training on military logistics. This research work aims to analyse learning priorities and the role of Computer-Based Training and Simulation (CBTS) on Military Supply Chain Logistics. Military logistics is a complex task that requires expertise for decisions on such factors as: (i) the mission to accomplish; (ii) the place to locate troops and all military facilities at the Area of Operations (AOO); the (iii) combat readiness level that will be expected to equip all the military operations; and the (iv) use of transportation resources and paths to follow in the AOO. In this work, each one of these factors is represented by a number of variables that must be considered as whole to outline the best decisions on supply chain logistics for each military operation. To identify training priorities for considering the implications of all variables that respond for these four factors, this work carried out a qualitative research with in depth interviews with military personal with expertise on making decisions about military logistics. Results from this research shows the skills that are most important to follow for developing expertise on military supply chain logistics and the technology that should best be applied to enhance the training experience. Conclusions from this work shows that training on military logistics involve decisions that are mostly unique, though the current computer-based technology has an important role for training and simulating field situations, thus enhancing the required expertise for making decisions on real military supply chain operations.

  • 42.
    Holmberg, Martin
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Hansén, Dan
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CRISMART (National Center for Crisis Management Research and Training).
    Uhr, Christian
    Lunds universitet.
    Situational Awareness and its Impact on Crisis-Induced Action: the Norwegian 22/7 Case2015In: Armed Forces for 2020 and beyond: Roles | Tasks | Expectations / [ed] Walter Feichtinger, Benedikt Hensellek, Wien: Federal Ministry of Defence and Sports, Austria , 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Holmberg, Martin
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Larsson, Gerry
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Ledarskapscentrum.
    Bynander, Fredrik
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CRISMART (National Center for Crisis Management Research and Training).
    A multidisciplinary approach to studying a societal crisis2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Holmberg, Martin
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Mattsson, Peter
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    Rethinking the use of C2 methods for small states facing an adversary with superior resources2015In: International Society of Military Sciences 2015 (ISMS 2015), 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Holmberg, Martin
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Svenson, Pontus
    Totalförsvarets forskningsinstitut, FOI.
    Information Fusion for Collaborating Commanders at Different Levels2011In: 16th International Command and Control Research and Technology Symposium, Quebec City, Canada, June 21-23, 2011., 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a position paper discussing the authors’ views on the role of automated information fusion in the interaction between different command levels. The purpose of the paper is to initiate a discussion on the relationship between automated fusion and the flexibility in a mission. The sharing of data/information/knowledge between commanders at different levels is a difficult task in many respects. We focus on the role of automated information fusion techniques in this frame. The paper asks two major questions: (1) Does automated fusion generate the unwanted side-effect of less flexibility? (2) How should a situational picture be represented at different command levels to promote cooperation? We also discuss some disadvantages of using traditional information fusion methods developed to handle either high or low level information. The conclusion is that information fusion techniques have to be chosen with care when making information systems that should be jointly used by commanders at different levels.

  • 46.
    Holmberg, Martin
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Svenson, Pontus
    Totalförsvarets forskningsinstitut, FOI.
    Lessons identified from the use of automated information fusion in collaborative environments2012In: 2012 IEEE International Multi-Disciplinary Conference on Cognitive Methods in Situation Awareness and Decision Support (CogSIMA): Conference Publications, 2012, p. 202-205Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present some lessons identified from FOI experiments on combining sensor data fusion and information fusion. Some ideas for future work are also presented.

  • 47.
    Jensen, Eva
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Balancing bath tubs in math class2005In: Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference of the System Dynamics Society, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Jensen, Eva
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Does system dynamics or control theory help you strike a balance?2008In: Proceedings of the 26th International Conference of the System Dynamics Society, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Jensen, Eva
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    Good sensemaking is more important than information quality for the quality of plans2006In: Proceedings of the 11th International Command and Control Research and Technology Symposium, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Jensen, Eva
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, Command & Control Studies Division.
    How to Operationalize C2 Agility2012In: 17th ICCRTS (2012): Proceeedings, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alberts has offered a definition of agility and its constituent components. This paper describes where in the C2 system, or the force, the different agility requirements will have to be met, and how to measure if they are. The purpose of a C2 system is to achieve focus and convergence of some entities (the force) somewhere (the context) to accomplish something (the task or mission), together (maybe with other organizations), within a certain amount of time. These factors determine the demands on a C2 system. Rasmussen’s abstraction hierarchy is used as the analytical framework, with the functions performed by C2 as defined by Brehmer. The paper discusses how to define the demands, i.e. the requisite agility, and how to assess if these demands can be met (potential agility), or have been met (manifest agility). The information requirements of a C2 system are determined by what is required of the commanded force for it to be agile in the present circumstances. The model traces the paths from the demands on the system to the parts of the system that are supposed to meet them, and makes possible the assessment of the manifest, and potential, agility of a C2 system.

123 1 - 50 of 144
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf