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  • 1.
    Weissmann, Mikael
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, Tactical Warfare Division, Land Operations Section.
    Understanding Power (Shift) in East Asia: the Sino-US Narrative Battle about Leadership in the South China Sea2019In: Asian Perspectives, ISSN 0066-8435, E-ISSN 1535-8283, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 223-248, article id https://doi.org/10.1353/apr.2019.0009Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article I study the competing US and Chinese narratives about the South China Sea. Arguing that the practice of calculating power shifts in terms of the changing distribution of material capabilities is inadequate, I complement existing literature by taking ideational and normative dimensions of power into account. I ask what the alternative Chinese narrative of power and leadership in the South China Sea looks like and how it is perceived by others in comparison with the dominant US narrative. While a "hard" power transition is ongoing, China's preferred narrative has yet to become widely accepted and the US narrative will remain dominant for now. Nevertheless, China has been making progress in shifting the narrative of what the future could look like with China's vision for a post-US regional and global order now seen as a possible alternative.

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