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  • 1.
    Heydarian Pashakhanlou, Arash
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, Tactical Warfare Division, Air Operations Section.
    Fully integrated content analysis in international relations2017In: International Relations, ISSN 0047-1178, E-ISSN 1741-2862, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 447-465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Content analysis has once again come to the forefront of discussions regarding methods in International Relations (IR). The first wave of content analysis in IR lasted from the 1940s to the 1960s and was marked by a commitment to quantitative and manual analyses. The second wave of content analysis appeared around the third millennium and continues to pervade the discipline also proceeds in a predominantly quantitative manner but emphasizes computer-assisted analysis rather than manual analysis. Critics and advocates of the method alike have, highlighted numerous shortcomings with these approaches. In order to address these limitations, the present investigation argues for a fully integrated content analysis that has the potential to ameliorate the identified weaknesses that have hitherto plagued the method. It accomplishes this task by combining all facets of the method: quantitative, qualitative, manual, and computer-assisted content analyses within a single research project.

  • 2.
    Noreen, Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Sjöstedt, Roxanna
    Lunds universitet.
    Ångström, Jan
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Division of Strategy.
    Why Small States join Big Wars: The Case of Sweden in Afghanistan 2002-20142017In: International Relations, ISSN 0047-1178, E-ISSN 1741-2862, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 145-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The security behavior of small states has traditionally been explained by different takes of realism, liberalism, or constructivism - focusing on the behavior that aims toward safeguarding sovereignty or engaging in peace policies. The issue of why states with limited military capacities and little or no military alignments or engagements decide to participate in an international mission has received limited attention by previous research. In contrast, this article argues that a three-layered discursive model can make the choices of small states more precisely explained and thereby contribute to an increased understanding of small states' security behavior beyond threat balancing and interdependence. Analyzing a deviant case of a non-aligned small state, this article explains why Sweden became increasingly involved in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) mission in Afghanistan. By focusing on the domestic political discourses regarding the Swedish involvement in this mission, it is suggested that a narrative shapes public perception of a particular policy and establishes interpretative dominance of how a particular event should be understood. This dominant domestic discourse makes a certain international behavior possible and even impossible to alter once established. In the Swedish case, it is demonstrated that this discourse assumed a catch-all' ambition, satisfying both domestic and international demands. In general terms, it should thus be emphasized that certain discourses and narratives are required in order to make it possible for a country to participate in a mission such as ISAF and prolong the mission for several years.

  • 3.
    Parker, Charles F.
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CRISMART (National Center for Crisis Management Research and Training). Uppsala Univ, Polit Sci, S-75120 Uppsala, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Dept Govt, S-75120 Uppsala, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Ctr Nat Disaster Sci, S-75120 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Christer
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Govt, S-75120 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Water & Environm Studies, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Climate change leaders and followers: Leadership recognition and selection in the UNFCCC negotiations2015In: International Relations, ISSN 0047-1178, E-ISSN 1741-2862, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 434-454Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Past research has posited that effective leadership is an essential ingredient in reaching international agreements and overcoming the collective action problems associated with responding to climate change. Despite its fundamental importance for leadership relationships, the demand side of the leadership equation has been comparatively neglected in the literature. In this study, we answer several related questions that are vital for understanding the leadership dynamics that impact the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) negotiations. Are there any leaders in the field of climate change and, if so, who are they? How do followers select climate leaders? What factors are important to them? Using unique survey data collected at four consecutive United Nations (UN) climate summits, Conference of Parties (COP) 14–17, this article investigates which actors are actually recognized as playing a leadership role in the UNFCCC negotiations and probes how followers select leadership candidates in this issue area. The survey findings reveal a fragmented leadership landscape, with no one clear-cut leader, and spotlight that if an actor seeks to be recognized as a leader, it is crucial to be perceived as being devoted to promoting the common good.

  • 4.
    Ångström, Jan
    Uppsala universitet.
    Mapping the Competing Historical Analogies of the War on Terrorism: The Bush Presidency2011In: International Relations, ISSN 0047-1178, E-ISSN 1741-2862, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 224-242Article in journal (Refereed)
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