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  • 1.
    Bang, Martin
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, Military-Technology Division.
    Pitfalls in Military Quantitative Intelligence Analysis: Incident Reporting in a Low Intensity Conflict2016In: Intelligence and national security, ISSN 0268-4527, E-ISSN 1743-9019, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 49-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Incidents are the key data for several of the statistical reports and analyses created within the military intelligence community. This paper discusses factors that affect the utility of quantitative methods in military intelligence analysis when used in a low intensity conflict. The first half of the paper presents the general critique of the use of quantitative methods. The second half applies this critique to the case of incident reporting in Afghanistan.

  • 2.
    de Werd, Peter
    et al.
    Netherlands Defence Academy, Breda, Netherlands, (NLD).
    Coulthart, Stephen
    College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security, University at Albany, Albany, USA, (USA).
    Pili, Giangiuseppe
    Università della Calabria IT, Rende (CS), Calabria, Italy, (ITA).
    Gaspard, Jules
    (AUS).
    Ivan, Cristina
    University of Bucharest, Bucuresti, Romania, (ROU).
    Ben Jaffel, Hager
    Department of War Studies, King’s College London, London, Great Britain, (GBR).
    Larsson, Sebastian
    Swedish Defence University, Department of War Studies, Land Operations Division.
    Rogers, Damien
    Massey University, Auckland, New Zeeland, (NZL).
    Bean, Hamilton
    Department of Communication at the University of Colorado, Denver, (USA).
    Ördén, Hedvig
    The Department of Strategic Communication, Lund University, Lund, (SWE).
    Kaunert, Christian
    Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland, (IRL).
    Newbery, Samantha
    University of Salford, Salford, UK, (GBR).
    Special Forum on intelligence and theory2024In: Intelligence and national security, ISSN 0268-4527, E-ISSN 1743-9019Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, Joint Warfare Division, Operational Functions Section.
    A theoretical reframing of the intelligence–policy relation2018In: Intelligence and national security, ISSN 0268-4527, E-ISSN 1743-9019, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 553-561Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The intertwined relation between policy and intelligence has long been considered a vital issue for intelligence studies. However, this article argues that the role of the intelligence services as producers of knowledge within policy processes has not yet been thoroughly discussed within academia. One possible overall theoretical framework for studying intelligence in its role as knowledge producer is that of policy analysis, especially if the variance of intelligence’s impact on policy is under scrutiny. More specifically, this article argues that the theoretical approaches within critical policy analysis and policy network analysis constitute productive frameworks for research into the intelligence–policy nexus.

  • 4.
    Hansén, Dan
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Political Science and Law, Political Science Division.
    Assessing intelligence oversight: the case of Sweden2023In: Intelligence and national security, ISSN 0268-4527, E-ISSN 1743-9019, Vol. 38, no 6, p. 938-955Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study of intelligence oversight captures the inherently political nature of secret intelligence. However, many studies of intelligence oversight adopt rather instrumentalist views that omit important political aspects of the policy process. Typically, these studies focus on obstacles to effective oversight. This article discusses how the effectiveness of oversight can be assessed by applying broad evaluative categories that contain programmatic, process-related, political, and durability dimensions. Empirically, the study probes the case of Sweden as an illustration. Swedish oversight arrangements have on balance been successful in some dimensions, particularly the programmatic dimension, which arguably also contributed to its relative longevity

  • 5.
    Lundborg, Tom
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Political Science and Law, Political Science Division.
    The politics of intelligence failures: power, rationality, and the intelligence process2023In: Intelligence and national security, ISSN 0268-4527, E-ISSN 1743-9019, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 726-739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article develops a new approach to analysing intelligence failures. Rather than looking for their causes, intelligence failures are here analysed as part of a politics seeking to reify the value of rationality and the taming of power. To analyse this politics, the article draws on Bent Flyvbjerg’s notion of an asymmetrical relation of power/rationality, according to which power has a productive role that is inseparable from claims to rationality. The asymmetrical relation of power/rationality is used in order to challenge the instrumentalist language that pervades much of the literature on intelligence failures and what can be learned from them.

  • 6.
    Molander, Pia
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division, Sektionen för operationskonst (KV Opkonst).
    Intelligence, Diplomacy and the Swedish Dilemma: The Special Operations Executive in Neutral Sweden 1939-452007In: Intelligence and national security, ISSN 0268-4527, E-ISSN 1743-9019, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 722-744Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article will survey the activities of Special Operations Executive (SOE) in Sweden during the course of the Second World War. Under the constraints of a foreign policy that sought to gradually encourage the government of Sweden to become more pro-allied rather than pro-axis and ‘non-belligerent’, SOE nonetheless entered Sweden with hopes of developing a series of contacts with groups and individuals that could be turned into active resistance if Sweden joined the axis, or if Nazi Germany either invaded or occupied Sweden and the whole of Scandinavia. Once the possibility of an axis invasion of Sweden was decisively dismissed, SOE had to find a different role. In Sweden, the successful development of SOE's intelligence gathering capabilities in the economic sphere, especially in the allied campaign against German iron-ore traffic and ball-bearings, provided the organization with a purpose that definitely took another course when compared to intelligence activities in other regions and countries. With these constraints in view, this article focuses on three major aspects of SOE involvement in Sweden. First, the article will examine SOE's role, and war aims in Sweden, linking these to the very different requirements of the Foreign Office. Second, the article will explore British and Swedish intelligence relations. Third, it will consider the Swedish security police response to British intelligence.

  • 7.
    Widén, Jerker
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies, War Studies Division.
    The Wennerström Spy Case: A Western Perspective2006In: Intelligence and national security, ISSN 0268-4527, E-ISSN 1743-9019, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 931-958Article in journal (Refereed)
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