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  • 1.
    Egnell, Robert
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security and Strategic Studies (ISS), Strategy Section.
    Winning 'Hearts and Minds'?: A Critical Analysis of Counter-Insurgency Operations in Afghanistan2010In: Civil Wars, ISSN 1369-8249, E-ISSN 1743-968X, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 282-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article conducts a critical analysis of the historical lessons, theassumptions and the conduct of ‘hearts and minds’ approaches to counterinsurgency.This results in challenges. Theoretically the ‘hearts and minds’approach is rooted in modernisation theory and a normative Western approachto legitimacy that fails to live up to the expectations of the local population.The approach is also based on lessons from past successes such as the British1950s campaign in Malaya. However, a great contextual shift has taken placesince then and the relevance of past experiences is therefore questionable ina context of complex state-building in the wake of intervention. This also haspractical consequences as we seek to rectify the often misapplied approachesof today.

  • 2.
    Hedström, Jenny
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of War Studies and Military History, Functions and Perspective Division.
    Faxon, Hilary Oliva
    University of Montana W A Franke College of Forestry and Conservation, Missoula, MT, (USA).
    Mar phyo, Zin
    (MMR).
    Pan, Htoi
    (MMR).
    Kha Yae, Moe
    (MMR).
    Yay, Ka
    (MMR).
    Mi, Mi
    (MMR).
    Forced Fallow Fields: Making Meaningful Life in the Myanmar Spring RevolutionIn: Civil Wars, ISSN 1369-8249, E-ISSN 1743-968XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women’s everyday work is critical to revolutionary projects yet is often written out of war stories. This article draws on a participatory photography project with rural women in Myanmar to show how, in the face of extensive violence, women’s productive and social reproductive labour sustains both individual households and revolutionary projects writ-large. We highlight the everyday acts of love and labour that generate affective and productive ties to rural landscapes, enabling people to endure violence and imagine a better future. Our work shows how making meaningful life has become both more difficult and more urgent during the Myanmar Spring Revolution.

  • 3.
    Hultman, Lisa
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security and Strategic Studies (ISS), Strategy Section.
    Keeping Peace or Spurring Violence? Unintended Effects of Peace Operations on Violence against Civilians2010In: Civil Wars, ISSN 1369-8249, E-ISSN 1743-968X, Vol. 12, no 1-2, p. 29-46Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Karlén, Niklas
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Division of Strategy.
    Changing Commitments: Shifts in External State Support to Rebels2022In: Civil Wars, ISSN 1369-8249, E-ISSN 1743-968X, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 73-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The provision of external state support to non-state armed groups in civil wars is a dynamic process. The calculus of state sponsors varies over time, which means that assistance provided to the armed opposition fluctuates. While we know much about the initiation of external support and its effects, we know less about why state sponsorship changes over time. To address this, I propose a theoretical argument that can account for policy adjustments over time. The theory builds on the notion that leaders change their support commitment when there is adverse feedback and that support increases as long as the causes of policy failure can be attributed to external actors, while cutbacks occur when failure is attributed to the state sponsor’s own actions. Process-tracing is used to illustrate the value of this framework in a within-case analysis of the United States’ support commitment to the armed opposition in Nicaragua in the 1980s. The study demonstrates the utility of focusing on shifts in leaders’ perceptions and domestic attribution processes rather than structural features of the international system or rebel behavior to understand temporal variation in external support.

  • 5.
    Käihkö, Ilmari
    Swedish Defence University, Department of War Studies and Military History, Strategy Division. School of Social Sciences, Södertörn University, Stockholm, (SWE).
    Ambiguity and Methodological Transparency in the Study of Civil War: An Answer to Themner’s ‘Lingering Command Structures’ in Liberia2022In: Civil Wars, ISSN 1369-8249, E-ISSN 1743-968X, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 524-534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers who study civil wars and other armed conflicts are bound to face ambiguities. This article continues the discussion about research brokers in conflict zones that started in a 2019 special issue of Civil Wars and scrutinises the finding that Liberian wartime command structures continue to linger in informal guises long to the post-conflict. Absent transparent acknowledging of the ambiguities it glosses over, past scholarship risks a far too neat story that imbues arguments with untested assumptions. The result neither captures the complexity of contemporary realities of Liberian former combatants nor helps Liberia to move forward from its difficult past.

  • 6.
    Käihkö, Ilmari
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Division of Strategy.
    On Brokers, Commodification of Information and Liberian Former Combatants2019In: Civil Wars, ISSN 1369-8249, E-ISSN 1743-968X, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 179-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates research brokers and commodification of information.When combined with inherently asymmetric research relationships and successfulgatekeeping, brokers create demand and become indispensable.Potential negative effects of brokerage and commodification of informationare discussed through experiences studying former combatants in Liberia.There bargains with brokers who could facilitate access to this hidden populationresulted in a vicious circle as brokers confirmed what researchers wantedto hear. The attention to this issue was first brought by subsequent ethnographyand participant observation, which also offer the promise of an ethicallydefensible way of collecting information.

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  • 7.
    Vastapuu, Leena
    Swedish Defence University, Department of War Studies and Military History, Strategy Division. Swedish Defence University, Department of War Studies and Military History, Functions and Perspective Division.
    Beans, Bullets and Bandages? Gendered and Racialised Othering in the Depiction of Military Support WorkIn: Civil Wars, ISSN 1369-8249, E-ISSN 1743-968XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Combat Service Support (CSS) refers to the direct and indirect sustainment services to the soldiers and units (potentially) engaged in combat activities. In the Global North militaries support work is called CSS and considered vital for the armed forces, while support work in ‘irregular’ forces of the Global South is rarely addressed, apart from feminist research. Through intersectional reading, I suggest that this discrepancy can be best explained by gendered and racialised forms of othering where ‘feminine’ care work (the first other) and ‘irregularity’ (the second other) are mutually reinforcing. Drawing on interview data with Oretha, as well as other Liberian CSS specialists, I show the practical implications of this form of (double-)othering in war and its aftermath.

1 - 7 of 7
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