Endre søk
Begrens søket
1 - 11 of 11
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Treff pr side
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
Merk
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1.
    Brehmer, Berndt
    et al.
    Försvarshögskolan, Militärvetenskapliga institutionen (MVI), Krigsvetenskapliga avdelningen (KVA).
    Naehlinder, Staffan
    Achieving what cannot be done: Coping with the time constants in a dynamic decision task by doing something else2007Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 48, nr 5, s. 359-365Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines how people handle the time constants in dynamic decision tasks, using a microworld called NEWFIRE which simulates forest fire fighting. The results showed that the participants did not adapt to the time constants, as shown by the fact that they did not discriminate between fires requiring different number of fire fighting units when varying the number of fire fighting units was a means of compensating for the time constants. If they were allowed to move units before the fire started their performance improved, suggesting that they could compensate for their problems with the time constants by restructuring the task in such a way that they did not need to consider them. It is suggested that such restructuring may well be how people handle dynamic tasks also in other circumstances, and that more effort should be put into studying what people actually do in dynamic tasks, rather than into only assessing whether or not they perform optimally.

  • 2.
    Jensen, Eva
    Försvarshögskolan, Militärvetenskapliga institutionen (MVI), Ledningsvetenskapliga avdelningen (LVA).
    Learning and transfer from a simple dynamic system2005Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 46, nr 2, s. 119-131Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The amount of learning gained from being assisted in completing the task of bringing a predator-prey system into equilibrium by controlling the predator population was investigated. Learning was explored both by post-task questioning and by testing for transfer to another predator-prey task. Participants were 28 undergraduate psychology students, all female. They were randomly and evenly split into an experiment group that was subjected to a learning session with the first task before being tested in the second task, and a control group that only performed the second task. What was most needed in the first task was help in sticking to analytically derived conclusions by resisting "common sense" responses. There was a significant transfer effect on performance to the second task, stemming from learning shown by half the participants in the experiment group. The other half showed hardly any learning. Learning in about half the subjects has proven a stable finding.

  • 3.
    Larsson, Gerry
    Försvarshögskolan, Institutionen för ledarskap och management (ILM).
    The Developmental Leadership Questionnaire (DLQ): Some psychometric properties2006Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 47, nr 4, s. 253-262Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The development leadership model (Larsson et al., 2003), designed to introduce refinements to the transformational leadership model, has been adopted for use in the Swedish Armed Forces. The Developmental Leadership Questionnaire (DLQ) was constructed to measure important parts of the model. The main aim of the study was to evaluate some psychometric properties of the DLQ. Most analyses are based on two subsets of individuals from a sample mostly consisting of male Swedish, military officers, each of whom has rated a given leader (n= 450 and 449 respectively). A second sample consisted of Swedish military cadets (n= 141). The dimensionality was assessed with a confirmatory factor analysis. Most DLQ scales were reasonably well reproduced and showed high or acceptable internal consistency. When related to perceived results of leadership (self-rated by leaders and rated by subordinates), results from multiple regression analyses supported what could be predicted by the theoretical model. It was concluded that the DLQ has acceptable psychometric properties and that the theoretical refinements introduced to the developmental leadership model were empirically supported.

  • 4.
    Larsson, Gerry
    et al.
    Försvarshögskolan, Institutionen för säkerhet, strategi och ledarskap (ISSL), Ledarskapscentrum.
    Berglund, Anna Karin
    Försvarshögskolan, Institutionen för säkerhet, strategi och ledarskap (ISSL), Ledarskapscentrum.
    Ohlsson, Alicia
    Försvarshögskolan, Institutionen för säkerhet, strategi och ledarskap (ISSL), Ledarskapscentrum.
    Daily hassles, their antecedents and outcomes among professional first responders: a systematic literature review2016Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 57, nr 4, s. 359-367Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Occupational groups such as firefighters, military officers, paramedics and police officers are exposed to a combination of acute, severe and accumulated everyday stress. Drawing on the daily hassles perspective on stress, the aim was to synthesize existing research on daily hassles in professional first responder settings into a theoretical model. A systematic mixed studies review with an integrated design was undertaken. The selection process resulted in 40 articles meeting the inclusion criteria. The selected papers represented two literature reviews, one qualitative study, eight longitudinal studies and 29 cross-sectional studies. Five superior categories emerged in the analysis: Individual antecedent and continuously framing factors, Environmental antecedent and continuously framing factors, Appraisal and coping processes, Daily hassles and Outcome. Suggestions for future research are presented

  • 5.
    Larsson, Gerry
    et al.
    Försvarshögskolan, Institutionen för säkerhet, strategi och ledarskap (ISSL), Ledarskapscentrum.
    Nilsson, Sofia
    Försvarshögskolan, Institutionen för säkerhet, strategi och ledarskap (ISSL), Ledarskapscentrum.
    Hyllengren, Peder
    Försvarshögskolan, Institutionen för säkerhet, strategi och ledarskap (ISSL), Ledarskapscentrum.
    Ohlsson, Alicia
    Försvarshögskolan, Institutionen för säkerhet, strategi och ledarskap (ISSL), Ledarskapscentrum.
    Waaler, Gudmund
    Royal Norwegian Naval Academy, Norway.
    Kallenberg, Kjell
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Stress reactions following acute situations involving moral challenges among health care professionals2018Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 59, nr 2, s. 177-185Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Many health care professionals have to make morally difficult decisions during acute, stressful situations. The aim was to explore the applicability of an existing qualitatively developed model of individual reactions among professional first responders following such situations using a quantitative approach. According to the model, the interaction of antecedent individual and contextual characteristics affect the immediate emotional reactions to acute, stressful events involving a moral dilemma. Continuous coping efforts and the quality of social support will also affect the long‐term positive and negative reactions to the event. The participants (n = 204, about 50% response rate) represented three Swedish health care professions stationed at a university hospital and a regional hospital: Physicians (n = 50), nurses (n = 94) and “others” (n =60, mainly social welfare officers and assistant nurses). Except for the personality dimension emotional stability which was measured using an established instrument, all measurement scales were operationalizations of codes and categories from the qualitative study (ten scales altogether). Four multiple regression analyses were performed with long‐term positive and negative reactions in everyday acute and morally extremely taxing situations respectively as dependent variables. The outcome showed that long‐term positive reactions covaried with much use of the coping strategies Emotional distancing and Constructive emotional confrontation and a perception of a well‐functioning Formal social support. Regarding long‐term negative reactions, higher age and little use of Emotional distancing accounted for much of the variance. Immediate emotional reactions also contributed significantly. Conclusion: the results largely supported the model concepts and their assumed relationships.

  • 6.
    Larsson, Gerry
    et al.
    Försvarshögskolan, Institutionen för säkerhet, strategi och ledarskap (ISSL), Ledarskapscentrum. Hedmark University College, Elverum, Norway.
    Sandahl, Christer
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Söderhjelm, Teresa
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Sjövold, Endre
    Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet, Norge.
    Zander, Ann
    Försvarshögskolan, Institutionen för säkerhet, strategi och ledarskap (ISSL), Ledarskapscentrum.
    Leadership behavior changes following a theory-based leadership development intervention: a longitudinal study of subordinates’ and leaders’ evaluations2017Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 58, nr 1, s. 62-68Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to evaluate effects of leadership courses based on the developmental leadership model at the leadership behavioral level. A longitudinal design was employed with assessments before, one and six months after the leadership courses. The sample consisted of 59 leaders who made self-ratings and were rated by at least three subordinates on each occasion. Leadership behaviors were measured with the Developmental Leadership Questionnaire (DLQ). A limited increase of favorable leadership behaviors and a significant reduction of unfavorable leadership behaviors were found, particularly according to the subordinates’ ratings. A cluster analysis yielded three meaningful leader profiles and showed that this pattern was found in all three profiles, irrespective of how favorably they were rated before the onset of the intervention.

  • 7.
    Larsson, Gerry
    et al.
    Försvarshögskolan, FOA 55, Beteendevetenskapliga institutionen.
    Starrin, Bengt
    Karlstads universitet.
    Psychiatric labels in the military setting: Some consequences on other people's causality attribution of personal and situational factors1983Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 24, nr 1, s. 57-61Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    About eight percent of all male Swedish eighteen-year-olds are exempted from military service on a psychiatric basis annually. From the perspective of the labelling theory of mental illness, the aim of this paper was to study some consequences on other people's perception of individuals who have been exempted on this basis. An experiment was performed with two different groups of subjects; 81 conscripts and 61 students of personnel administration. The subjects were to listen to a tape-recorded description of a car accident and to evaluate its causes. A brief description of the life history of the driver was given which included a “label”. It was foud that with a psychiatric exemption label the accident was attribuited significantly more to factors internal to the driver than to external factors, as compared to a general problems-living label.

  • 8.
    Larsson, Gerry
    et al.
    Försvarshögskolan, Institutionen för ledarskap och management (ILM).
    Weibull, H.
    Wilde-Larsson, B.
    Analysis of the decision making process leading to appendectomy: A grounded theory study2004Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 45, nr 5, s. 449-454Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to develop a theoretical understanding of the decision-making process leading to appendectomy. A qualitative interview study was performed in the grounded theory tradition using the constant comparative method to analyze data. The study setting was one county hospital and two local hospitals in Sweden, where 11 surgeons and 15 surgical nurses were interviewed. A model was developed which suggests that surgeons’ decision making regarding appendectomy is formed by the interplay between their medical assessment of the patient's condition and a set of contextual characteristics. The latter consist of three interacting factors: (1) organizational conditions, (2) the professional actors’ individual characteristics and interaction, and (3) the personal characteristics of the patient and his or her family or relatives. In case the outcome of medical assessment is ambiguous, the risk evaluation and final decision will be influenced by an interaction of the contextual characteristics. It was concluded that, compared to existing, rational models of decision making, the model presented identified potentially important contextual characteristics and an outline on when they come into play.

  • 9. Lygre, R B
    et al.
    Eid, J
    Larsson, Gerry
    Försvarshögskolan, Institutionen för ledarskap och management (ILM).
    Ranstorp, Magnus
    Försvarshögskolan, Institutionen för säkerhet och strategi (ISS).
    Terrorism as a process: A critical review of Moghaddam's "Staircase to terrorism" model2011Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 52, nr 6, s. 609-616Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study reviews empirical evidence for Moghaddam’s model “Staircase to Terrorism,” which portrays terrorism as a process of six consecutive steps culminating in terrorism. An extensive literature search, where 2,564 publications on terrorism were screened, resulted in 38 articles which were subject to further analysis. The results showed that while most of the theories and processes linked to Moghaddam’s model are supported by empirical evidence, the proposed transitions between the different steps are not. These results may question the validity of a linear stepwise model and may suggest that a combination of mechanisms/factors could combine in different ways to produce terrorism.

  • 10.
    Thunholm, Peter
    Försvarshögskolan, Militärvetenskapliga institutionen (MVI), Krigsvetenskapliga avdelningen (KVA).
    Decision-Making Styles and Physiological Correlates of Negative Stress: Is There a Relation?2008Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 49, nr 3, s. 213-219Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    There are 5 independent, although not mutually exclusive, styles used by military officers when making decisions: rational, intuitive, dependent, avoidant, and spontaneous (Scott & Bruce, 1995). The rational and intuitive styles are part of the cognitive style concept, whereas the conceptual foundation of the remaining 3 styles is less clear. The dependent and the avoidant styles were expected to be accompanied by increased levels of negative stress, while this was not expected of the remaining 3 styles. This hypothesis was put to test. Twenty-three male Swedish Army majors were asked to make decisions in 2 different military situations. Their decision styles were measured by the General Decision Making Style inventory (GDMS; Scott & Bruce, 1995). Saliva cortisol release indicated negative stress and was measured on 4 occasions: twice before, after the first decision, and after the second decision. The avoidant style was related to negative stress, as predicted. There was, however, no difference between the base-line measurements and the after-decision measurements, suggesting that officers with an avoidant decision style may, in general, have higher levels of cortisol secretion (i.e., being more of the worrying kind).

  • 11.
    Thunholm, Peter
    Försvarshögskolan, Militärvetenskapliga institutionen (MVI), Ledningsvetenskapliga avdelningen (LVA).
    Military Leaders and Followers: Do They Have Different Decision Styles?2009Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 50, nr 4, s. 317-325Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    There are five different, although not mutually exclusive, styles exhibited by military officers when making decisions: rational, intuitive, dependent, avoidant, and spontaneous (Scott & Bruce, 1995). The purpose was to investigate if elected leaders of military planning teams had a different configuration of decision-making styles than their team members. Participants were 98 army captains organized in 16 brigade-level planning teams. The results indicate that team leaders tended to be more spontaneous and less rational, dependent and avoidant in their style configuration than their team members. One possible explanation is that the style configuration exhibited by many of the elected leaders comes through to others as forcefulness and decisiveness and that such a profile is in line with a general leadership culture. The results also provide support for the General Decision-Making Style inventory as a measurement of decision styles, because they suggest that the self-reports coincide with displayed, observable behavior.

1 - 11 of 11
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf