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  • 1.
    Hultin, Lotta
    et al.
    Stockholm School of Economics, (SWE).
    Introna, Lucas D.
    Lancaster University Management School, (GBR).
    Balázs Göransson, Markus
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, Tactical Warfare Division, Land Operations Section.
    Mähring, Magnus
    Stockholm School of Economics, (SWE).
    Precarity, Hospitality, and the Becoming of a Subject That Matters: A Study of Syrian Refugees in Lebanese Tented Settlements2022In: Organization Studies, ISSN 0170-8406, E-ISSN 1741-3044, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 669-697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How is it possible to gain a sense that you have a voice and that your life matters when you have lost everything and live your life as a ‘displaced person’ in extreme precarity? We explore this question by examining the mundane everyday organizing practices of Syrian refugees living in tented settlements in Lebanon. Contrasting traditional empirical settings within organization studies where an already placed and mattering subject can be assumed, our context provides an opportunity to reveal how relations of recognition and mattering become constituted, and how subjects in precarious settings become enacted as such. Specifically, drawing on theories on the relational enactment of self and other, we show how material-discursive boundary-making and invitational practices – organizing a home, cooking and eating, and organizing a digital ‘home’ – function to enact relational host/guest subject positions. We also disclose how these guest/host relationalities create the conditions of possibility for the enactment of a subject that matters, and for the despair enacted in everyday precarious life to transform into ‘undefeated despair’.

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  • 2.
    Kindström Dahlin, Moa
    et al.
    Uppsala University (SWE).
    Larsson, Oscar
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, Tactical Warfare Division, Maritime Operations Section.
    Winell, Anneli
    Uppsala University (SWE).
    Conclusion2021In: Religion, migration and Existial wellbeing / [ed] Moa Kindström Dahlin, Oscar L. Larsson, Anneli Winell, London: Routledge, 2021, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This concluding chapter of the edited volume provides empirical and theoretical insights on the topics and contributions of the individual chapters. At the core of the argument and purpose of the book was an interest to identify and discuss the conditions of co-existence and solidarity among different groups in society, as well as how individuals could achieve a sense of socio-cultural belonging, including physical and mental health, which could potentially spur social cohesion in the age of diversity. The chapters in the book have touched upon a number of related issues and the contributing authors have made their analyses with examples from several countries (such as Sweden, Greece, Hungary, Australia, Finland and Belgium). All the chapters provide their own analyses and conclusions, which is why this closing chapter has the humble ambition of sharing some of the observations and reflections we have made during the journey of curating and theorising this volume.

  • 3.
    Kindström, Moa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, (SWE).
    Larsson, Oscar
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, Tactical Warfare Division, Maritime Operations Section.
    Winell, Anneli
    Uppsala University, (SWE).
    Introduction: Theorizing the role of religion in contemporary migration and integration governance2020In: Religion, Migration and Existential Wellbeing / [ed] Larsson, Oscar; Kindström Moa; Winell, Anneli, London: Routledge, 2020, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book aims to engage with one of the more pressing issues in the contemporary world, namely migration, either forced or voluntary. It intends to do so by focusing on the wellbeing of migrants and the role of religion in processes of integration in host societies. The book brings together researchers from various disciplines taking on the challenge to elaborate on the theme of this book from different perspectives, using different methods and theories. The value of multidisciplinary research on the role of religion in a globalised society – locally, nationally and internationally – can hardly be overestimated. Religious aspects and actors are present in legal, political and social policy contexts and form the basis for future research on e.g. secularisation, democracy, minorities, human rights, welfare, healthcare and identity formation. These and other related topics are discussed in this book. This introductory chapter provides the theoretical foundation for the book and its contributions

  • 4.
    Kindström, Moa
    et al.
    Uppsala University (SWE).
    Larsson, OscarSwedish Defence University, Department of Military Studies, Tactical Warfare Division, Maritime Operations Section.Winell, AnneliUppsala University (SWE).
    Religion, Migration, and Existential Wellbeing2021Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book uses the very latest research to examine current interactions between religion, migration and existential wellbeing. In particular, it demonstrates the role of religion and religious organizations in the social, medical and existential wellbeing of immigrants within their host societies. By focusing on the role and politics of religion and religious organisations as well as the religious identity and faith of individuals, it highlights the connection between existential wellbeing, integration and social cohesion.

    The book brings together researchers from various disciplines taking on the challenge to elaborate on the theme of this book from different perspectives, using different methods and theories with a wide selection of cases from various parts of the world. The value of multidisciplinary research on the role of religion in a globalised society – locally, nationally and internationally – is important for understanding the composition and potential solutions to social and political problems. Religious aspects and organisations are present in legal, political and social forms of governance and form the basis for future research on e.g. secularisation, democracy, minorities, human rights, welfare, healthcare and identity formation. These and other related topics are discussed in this book.

    This book is an up-to-date and multifaceted study of how religion engages with the mass movement of peoples. As such, it will be of great interest to any scholar of Religious Studies, Migrant Studies, Sociology of Religion, Religion and Politics, as well as Legal Studies with a human right focus

  • 5.
    Landström, Yrsa
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section, Sektionen för krishantering och internationell samverkan.
    Ekengren, Magnus
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section, Sektionen för krishantering och internationell samverkan.
    Migration, Borders, and Society2021In: Understanding the Creeping Crisis / [ed] Boin, Arjen; Ekengren, Magnus; Rhinard, Mark, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2021, p. 87-104Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, we have learned that forced global migration pose a serious threat to international peace and societal values. Despite the many warnings and refugee crises across the world, most national governments have insufficiently addressed this threat. In this chapter, we try to explain this lack of action. The chapter explores possible explanations such as the denial mindset of “it probably won’t happen here (and if it does, it won’t affect my family and community)”. The chapter focuses on the border management crisis in Sweden in 2015. The Swedish government did not address the situation as a crisis until the refugees, who had been on the Mediterranean Sea and traversing north over the continent for months, ended up in Malmö in the south of Sweden in September 2015. This predictable set of events caused chaos for the unprepared Swedish police and the border and migration authorities who had to handle the situation under conditions of urgency and apparent uncertainty.

  • 6.
    Makri, Maria
    et al.
    Hellenic Coast Guard (GRC).
    Dalaklis, Dimitrios
    World Maritime University, Malmö, (SWE).
    Ávila-Zúñiga Nordfjeld, Adriana
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Systems Science for Defence and Security, Systems Science for Defence and Security Division.
    Irregular Migrants and Refugee Flows in the Aegean Sea: The Contribution of the Hellenic Coast Guard in Managing the External Sea Borders of the European Union2022In: Il Diritto Maritimo, ISSN 0012-348X, no 4, p. 862-886Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An extended number of people still risk their life today, while illegally crossing the Mediterranean and/or the Aegean Sea as part of an effort to reach a European country. Border management constitutes a crucial tool for effectively dealing with illegal and irregular migration via sea. However, migration and border management literature is lacking studies that address the genuine drivers of migrant crisisfrom a (geo)strategic viewpoint, or rely on the theoretical underpinning of border management from that same angle. This article aims to examine the root causes of a specific national security challenge currently faced by Greece and the EU in large part, namely mixed migratory flows in the Aegean Sea. It explores the theoretical(geo)strategic underpinning of border management at the external EU borders inthe Aegean Sea; merely desk research was used for the collection/analysis of the data. Relevant results suggest that (geo)strategic considerations provide improved understanding not only of the root causes of seaborne migration that are identified as heightened status of insecurity and extreme poverty in the States of origin, but also of strategy formulation in the field of border management at European and national level (Greek sea borders). Results are discussed in terms of existent (geo)strategic theories and models, with a special focus on the ‘strategic thinking in 3D’ framework, the ‘Heartland’ and ‘Rimland’ theses, as well as topographical features and demographics.The aim is to shed light on strategic thinking and planning in the wider domain of security and provide recommendations to improve the current situation.

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  • 7.
    Olivius, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Statsvetenskapliga institutionen.
    Hedström, Jenny
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap..
    Young women's leadership in conflict: Crossing borders in Myanmar2020In: Young women and leadership / [ed] Katrina Lee-Koo, Lesley Pruitt, Abingdon & New York: Routledge , 2020, p. 45-63Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiple armed conflicts in Myanmar have resulted in long-term, large-scale forced displacement, humanitarian crises, and immense human suffering. However, the borderlands of Myanmar’s neighboring countries have also provided political space for the mobilization of diverse forms of oppositional politics, ranging from armed resistance to human rights documentation, alternative news reporting on the situation in Myanmar, and international networking and lobbying. In particular, since the 1990s these borderlands, most notably the Thai-Myanmar border areas, have seen the emergence of a vibrant and outspoken multi-ethnic women’s movement.

    In this chapter, we explore how young women activists from Myanmar have been able to carve out new spaces and forms of leadership while in exile in Thailand. From its inception, the border-based women’s movement made leadership training - specifically targeting young women - a key feature. We examine the impact of these training programs in the lives of women activists, and trace how graduates of these programs have moved on to lead in ways that have created social and political change within exiled oppositional politics and diaspora communities in Thailand. We analyze how the recent return of exiled activists and oppositional groups to Myanmar reshapes the conditions for young women’s leadership, presenting formerly exiled activists with new challenges as well as new avenues for leadership.

    Our analysis illustrates the political potential of border-crossing in several senses. In a spatial sense, we demonstrate how the diasporic, transnational political space in Thailand enabled young women to challenge age and gender norms and hierarchies to a degree previously unimagined, making young women leaders a significant force in Burmese diasporic politics. We note the importance of international advocacy and transnational networking to the growing recognition of young women as effective leaders, understanding this as another form of border-crossing. However, with return to Myanmar the political space for young women’s leadership is (again) reconfigured; accordingly, the effectiveness of leadership strategies and styles established in exile are reconsidered. In a conceptual sense, our analysis illuminates how young women activists have moved across boundaries between public and private leadership and formal and informal leadership. We highlight how the strategic deployment of women’s reproductive duties in the private sphere have created opportunities for women’s participation in the public sphere, for example in refugee camps and ethnic minority armed organizations.  In the nationwide ceasefire process, women have combined informal advocacy through “tea break advocacy” (Pepper, 2018) with formal positions as leaders of women’s groups. We argue that in skillfully moving across these conceptual boundaries, young women activists’ affect social and political change. Situating border-crossing as a key feature of young women’s leadership in this context, we thus contribute to theorizing the character and impact of young women’s leadership.

  • 8.
    Ternström, Clara
    Swedish Defence University.
    The Kampala Convention vs. Bare Life: A Qualitative Analysis of the Kampala Convention and its Impact on IDPs’ Quality of Life2024Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to identify potential ways in which the African Union Convention for the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons in Africa (Kampala Convention) improves the quality of life for IDPs. Relying on the concept of bare life, it answers if and how the convention prevents bare life. Drawing on theory and previous research on bare life in relation to IDPs, the analytical framework forms four theoretical dimensions to which the Kampala Convention, Translating The Kampala Convention Into Practice: A Stocktaking Exercise (ICRC, 2017) and The Kampala Convention: Key Recommendations Ten Years On (ICRC, 2019) are applied. Based on a grading, the results tell of the convention’s effects. The IDPs’ rights and political agency are adequately respected; quotidian culture and prevention of exclusionary practices are promoted yet insufficiently. Adding humanitarianism, biopolitics and host communities as additional findings, there are areas that should be carefully respected, but bare life is mostly prevented. Hopefully, this study can add knowledge to the progress of the Kampala Convention and provide a framework for similar analyses of policy and practice on aiding people in distress.

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    Kampala Convention vs. Bare Life
1 - 8 of 8
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