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Systematic Knowledge Sharing in a Natural Hazard Damage Context: How Organizational Borders Limit Lessons Learned
Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Division of Leadership. Karlstad Univ, Ctr Climate & Safety, Karlstad, Sweden.;CNDS, Uppsala, Sweden.;Karlstad Univ, Karlstad, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden..
Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Division of Leadership. Karlstad Univ, Ctr Climate & Safety, Karlstad, Sweden.;CNDS, Uppsala, Sweden.;Karlstad Univ, Karlstad, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden..
Swedish Transport Adm, Maintenance Div, Gothenburg, Sweden..
2017 (English)In: Risk, Hazards & Crisis in Public Policy, ISSN 1944-4079, E-ISSN 1944-4079, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 356-380Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this paper is to increase knowledge about systematic lessons learning in a public-private partnership. Empirically, it focuses on road maintenance in Sweden where the Swedish Transport Administration (STA) is responsible for the state-owned infrastructure and tendered contractors carry out all maintenance. The tendering process stipulates that the stakeholders should enable learning and the knowledge transfer that is, by necessity, required for preventive purposes. Semi-structured interviews with project leaders from the STA and respondents from two tendering contractors of maintenance were used to investigate attitudes to and the understanding of sharing experiences and knowledge about damage caused by weather extremes and the relevance of climate change adaptation in their field. The analysis suggests that most of the respondents' experiences stay within their own organization, which creates parallel feedback loops, rather than becomes shared knowledge that could be used as lessons learned enhancing preventive work against future damage and loss. The analysis indicates imbalance in feedback of knowledge concerning weather extremes and their effects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY , 2017. Vol. 8, no 4, p. 356-380
Keywords [en]
feedback loops, lessons learned, risk management, climate change adaptation, public-private partnership, road maintenance
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Ledarskap under påfrestande förhållanden
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-8024DOI: 10.1002/rhc3.12119ISI: 000417860900005OAI: oai:DiVA.org:fhs-8024DiVA, id: diva2:1229381
Available from: 2018-06-29 Created: 2018-06-29 Last updated: 2018-06-29

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