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Social Media’s Challenge to Journalistic Norms and Values during a Terror Attack
Department of Journalism and Media Studies, Oslo, Norway; Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Norway.
Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CRISMART (National Center for Crisis Management Research and Training).
2017 (English)In: Digital Journalism, ISSN 2167-0811, E-ISSN 2167-082X, Vol. 5, no 9, p. 1192-1204Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Over the past decade, the frequency of terror attacks around the world has increased. In the context of the 22 July 2011 terror attacks in Norway, social media use by citizens, and even victims, became an essential feature of reporting. Social media confronted the legacy media's way of covering crisis events. It raised questions about traditional journalism's ability to handle audience's as, not only news consumers, but also producers. In the present article, we look at the ways in which the professional norms and values of traditional journalism are specifically challenged by social media use in times of terror, using the 22 July 2011 attacks as a case study. We find that Norwegian journalists initially held to their professional roles, and to the classic self-representational principles of journalism, including objectivity, autonomy and immediacy. When they integrated social media into their traditional platforms and modes of coverage, they framed it as a "source" of sorts. As the 22 July 2011 event coverage became more focused on the collective grief felt by the nation, in turn, the traditional journalistic principles of objectivity and autonomy became less relevant, enabling yet more audience participation and social media use in relation to the attack.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 5, no 9, p. 1192-1204
Keywords [en]
22 July 2011 terror attacks, journalistic norms and values, social media, terror
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot krishantering och internationell samverkan
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-7186DOI: 10.1080/21670811.2016.1243990ISI: 000418497400006OAI: oai:DiVA.org:fhs-7186DiVA, id: diva2:1172367
Available from: 2018-01-09 Created: 2018-01-09 Last updated: 2018-06-29Bibliographically approved

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Olsson, Eva-Karin

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CiteExportLink to record
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  • apa
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Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
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  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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