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Operation Deadstick: En fallstudie av taktisk framgång och strategiska effekter
Swedish Defence University.
2017 (Swedish)Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

In the field of research into special operations, there is a need for a wider understanding of why special operations succeed, and how individual special, direct-action operations can contribute to both tactical and strategic outcomes, because their strategic effects have often been either marginalized or heavily exaggerated. 

To further expand our knowledge of how special operations can succeed, and the possible strategic effects of such operations on conventional combat forces’ operations, the study examines the case of Operation Deadstick, using Willliam H. McRaven's theory of relative superiority and James D. Kira's theory of the strategic importance of special operations. Operation Deadstick was a special operation during the invasion of Normandy in 1944 with the objective of seizing two bridges that were important for both sides. Extensive defense preparation had been carried out at the bridges.

The results of the study indicate that McRaven's theory can be used to explain the success of the case at a tactical level, as the principles are met to some extent. The principle of simplicity through good intelligence, as well as the importance of extensive exercise before the operation, are described as strong contributors to the success of the operation. However, the success was also largely due to misjudgment and the opponent’s lack of fighting spirit. The operation's strategic impact, defined as the increased effect of conventional combat forces, was primarily the seizure of important infrastructure in a way otherwise not possible for conventional forces, and which was unexpected by the opponent. This contributed to increased freedom of action for higher commanders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. , 45 p.
Keyword [sv]
Operation Deadstick, Pegasus bridge, William H. MacRaven, James D. Kiras, specialoperationer
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-6824OAI: oai:DiVA.org:fhs-6824DiVA: diva2:1121358
Subject / course
War Studies, Thesis
Educational program
Officersprogrammet (OP)
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2017-07-17 Created: 2017-07-10 Last updated: 2017-07-17Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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