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Daily interpersonal conflicts and daily negative and positive affect: exploring the moderating role of neuroticism
Department of Psychosocial Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway, (NOR).
Organizational Psychology, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands;c, (NLD), University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa, (ZAF).
Department of Psychosocial Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway;d National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo, Norway, (NOR).
Swedish Defence University, Institutionen för ledarskap och ledning, Leadership and Command & Control Division Stockholm.
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(English)In: Anxiety, Stress, and Coping, ISSN 1061-5806, E-ISSN 1477-2205Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background and Objectives

Drawing on affective events theory, the present study investigates relationships between daily interpersonal conflicts and negative and positive affective reactions, and tested whether trait neuroticism moderates immediate (same day) and persisting (next-day) affective reactions.

Design and Methods

A sample of 53 Norwegian naval cadets completed a diary questionnaire for 30 consecutive days (total N = 1590).

Results

As predicted, the findings showed that cadets reported more negative affect (but not less positive affect) on days they were confronted with affective events that were of a conflicting nature. In addition, the proposed interaction effects between daily conflict and neuroticism were significant for both negative and positive affect. Specifically, the immediate and persistent effects of daily conflicts on negative affect were strongest for individuals high (vs. low) in neuroticism. Moreover, individuals high in neuroticism reported less positive affect on days with conflicts, whereas individuals low in neuroticism reported more positive affect the two days following interpersonal conflicts.

Conclusions

The findings contribute to affective events theory with important knowledge about the role of trait neuroticism in dealing with interpersonal conflicts in a natural work setting.

Keywords [en]
Affective events, theory interpersonal conflict, diary study, neuroticism
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Leadership and Command & Control
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-12054DOI: 10.1080/10615806.2023.2293165OAI: oai:DiVA.org:fhs-12054DiVA, id: diva2:1822357
Available from: 2023-12-22 Created: 2023-12-22 Last updated: 2024-02-15

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