Logo: to the web site of the Swedish Defence University

fhs.se
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Loyal to the end: Examining the meaning of loyalty among high-ranking military officers
Swedish Defence University, Institutionen för ledarskap och ledning, Leadership and Command & Control Division Stockholm.
Swedish Defence University, Institutionen för ledarskap och ledning, Leadership and Command & Control Division Stockholm.
Swedish Defence University, Institutionen för ledarskap och ledning, Leadership and Command & Control Division Karlstad.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8274-6065
2023 (English)In: Res Militaris, E-ISSN 2265-6294, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 936-953Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Organizations need co-workers who are committed to common goals and that are loyal to the core values of the organization.[1] The conscious fostering of organizational core values is seen as an important tool in creating loyal co-workers and hence an effective organization.[2] Professions with a strong vocational calling such as medicine (Kallin, 2010), the police (Ewin, 1990 ; Foust, 2018) or the military[3] have particular demands on loyalty to certain core values, and individuals are expected to adopt these as their own. However, organizational core values can be contradictive (Billig, 1988) and sometimes in conflict with the individual´s own core values which – when incompatible – can in turn cause severe moral stress and mental illness.[4] This implies a need for clarification about what is expected from members of an organization concerning the objectives and manifestations of core values. In terms of loyalty, the military profession is possibly one of the most demanding, expecting individuals to risk their own lives and to kill other human beings for the benefit of the organizational goals. However, since misplaced loyalty can cause destructive,[5] and unethical behaviour[6] with enormous consequences – especially in the military (Winslow, 1998) – there is a need to be clear about what kind of loyalty behaviour is constructive and vice versa. Although loyalty is a concept that seems to be defined in many different ways, the number of studies of loyalty and its meaning are quite limited - especially in military research.[7] The overall purpose of this study is to broaden understanding of the meaning of loyalty within the military. Because important core values of an organization are set – or strongly influenced[8] – by its leaders,[9] the aim of this study was to explore how high-ranking officers in the Swedish Armed Forces (SAF) give meaning to their own personal experiences of loyalty and to describe possible common patterns within the participant group.

 [1] Wieseke, Alavi & Habel, 2014.[2] Berghaus & Cartagena, 2013.[3] Huntington, 1985 ; Moskos & Wood, 1988 ; Kirkhaug, 2009 ; Olsthoorn, 2011 ; Beard, 2014.[4] Molendijk, Kramer & Verweij, 2018.[5] Gabriel, 1982 ; Connor, 2010.)[6] Umphress & Bingham, 2011.[7] Olsthoorn, 2011 ; Connor, Andrews, Noack-Lundberg & Wadham, 2019.[8] Larsson, Haerem, Sjöberg, Alvinius & Bakken, 2007.[9] Fergusson & Milliman, 2008 ; Oh, Cho & Lim, 2018.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2023. Vol. 13, no 3, p. 936-953
Keywords [en]
Sweden, military, officers, loyalty, core values, dilemmas
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Leadership and Command & Control
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-10550OAI: oai:DiVA.org:fhs-10550DiVA, id: diva2:1622166
Available from: 2021-12-21 Created: 2021-12-21 Last updated: 2024-02-06Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records

Engelkes, TorbjörnHedlund, ErikLarsson, Gerry

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Engelkes, TorbjörnHedlund, ErikLarsson, Gerry
By organisation
Leadership and Command & Control Division StockholmLeadership and Command & Control Division Karlstad
In the same journal
Res Militaris
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 1046 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf