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Publications (5 of 5) Show all publications
Bohman, V. & Nymalm, N. (2020). Kinesiska investeringar i Sverige: från framgång till fara?. Internasjonal Politikk, 78(1), 93-105
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kinesiska investeringar i Sverige: från framgång till fara?
2020 (Swedish)In: Internasjonal Politikk, ISSN 0020-577X, E-ISSN 1891-1757, Vol. 78, no 1, p. 93-105Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [sv]

Under 2017 och 2018 ökade Kinas direktinvesteringar i Sverige avsevärt till följd av ett antal stora förvärv, mestadels i fordonsindustrin. Samtidigt har den svenska offentliga debatten kring kinesiska investeringar blivit mer kritisk sedan 2017, då investeringarna överlag talades om i positiva ordalag. Under 2018 och 2019 har en rad aktörer inom statliga myndigheter, politiska partier, media och civilsamhället beskrivit Kinas investeringar som ett potentiellt säkerhetshot. Näringslivsrepresentanter är mindre synliga i debatten men även här finns det en tydlig trend av ökad uppmärksamhet på potentiella säkerhetsrisker kopplade till kinesiska investeringar. Den svenska synen på Kina tycks konvergera allt mer med vad EU har kallat för sin nya ”mer realistiska” hållning gentemot Peking. Ett antal policyprocesser har inletts, vilket sannolikt kommer leda till att svensk lagstiftning stärks på flera områden för att öka kontrollen av Kinas investeringar och engagemang i Sverige, särskilt i kritisk infrastruktur såsom telekommunikationsnät men även vad gäller företag vars verksamhet anses som säkerhetskänslig i mer generell bemärkelse.

Abstract [en]

China’s direct investment in Sweden surged in 2017 and 2018 due to a number of large acquisitions, mostly in the automotive industry. At the same time, the public debate on Chinese investments has become more critical since 2017, when they were typically seen in a positive light. Throughout 2018 and 2019, a number of actors in government authorities, political parties, the media and civil society have described China’s investments as a potential security threat. Although less prominent in the public debate, business representatives have also become increasingly vocal about potential security risks associated with Chinese investment. The Swedish view of China seems to be aligning with what the EU has called its new “more realistic” approach to Beijing. Meanwhile, a number of policy processes have been launched which are likely to lead to the strengthening of existing legal frameworks to scrutinise Chinese investment and activity in Sweden, especially concerning critical infrastructure such as telecommunications networks, but also more generally concerning companies whose activities are regarded as sensitive from a security perspective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cappelen Damm Akademisk, 2020
Keywords
Kina, investeringar, Sverige, säkerhet, granskning
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Krigsvetenskap
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-9040 (URN)10.23865/intpol.v78.1794 (DOI)
Available from: 2020-02-13 Created: 2020-02-13 Last updated: 2020-02-24Bibliographically approved
Nymalm, N. & Plagemann, J. (2019). Comparative Exceptionalism: Universality and Particularity in Foreign Policy Discourses. International Studies Review, 21(1), 12-37
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparative Exceptionalism: Universality and Particularity in Foreign Policy Discourses
2019 (English)In: International Studies Review, ISSN 1521-9488, E-ISSN 1468-2486, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 12-37Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Existing research on exceptionalism in foreign policy suggests a number of confrontational features making it a threat to peaceful international relations. Largely based on US and European cases, and hardly ever taking a comparative approach, this literature overlooks a variety of exceptionalisms in non-Western countries, including so called “rising powers” such as China and India. A comparison between exceptionalist foreign policy discourses of the United States, China, India, and Turkey shows that exceptionalism is neither exclusive to the United States, nor a “new” phenomenon within rising powers, nor necessarily confrontational, unilateralist, or exemptionalist. As a prerequisite for comparative work, we establish two features common to all exceptionalist foreign policy discourses. In essence, such discourses are informed by supposedly universal values derived from a particular civilization heritage or political history. In order to systematize different versions of exceptionalism, we then propose four ideal types, each of which reflects exceptionalism's common trait of a claim to moral superiority and uniqueness but diverges across other important dimensions, with implications for its potentially offensive character. The article concludes by formulating a research agenda for future comparative work on exceptionalist foreign policy discourses and their repercussions for great power relations and global politics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
Keywords
discourse, exceptionalism, foreign policy
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-8985 (URN)10.1093/isr/viy008 (DOI)
Available from: 2020-02-04 Created: 2020-02-04 Last updated: 2020-02-24Bibliographically approved
Turner, O. & Nymalm, N. (2019). Morality and Progress: IR narratives on international revisionism and the status quo. Cambridge Review of International Affairs, 32(4), 407-428
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Morality and Progress: IR narratives on international revisionism and the status quo
2019 (English)In: Cambridge Review of International Affairs, ISSN 0955-7571, E-ISSN 1474-449X, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 407-428Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Scholars debate the ambitions and policies of today’s ‘rising powers’ and the extent to which they are revising or upholding the international status quo. While elements of the relevant literature provide valuable insight, this article argues that the concepts of revisionism and the status quo within mainstream International Relations (IR) have always constituted deeply rooted, autobiographical narratives of a traditionally Western-dominated discipline. As ‘ordering narratives’ of morality and progress, they constrain and organize debate so that revisionism is typically conceived not merely as disruption, but as disruption from the non-West amidst a fundamentally moral Western order that represents civilizational progress. This often makes them inherently problematic and unreliable descriptors of the actors and behaviours they are designed to explain. After exploring the formations and development of these concepts throughout the IR tradition, the analysis is directed towards narratives around the contemporary ‘rise’ of China. Both scholarly and wider political narratives typically tell the story of revisionist challenges China presents to a US/Western-led status quo, promoting unduly binary divisions between the West and non-West, and tensions and suspicions in the international realm. The aim must be to develop a new language and logic that recognize the contingent, autobiographical nature of ‘revisionist’ and ‘status quo’ actors and behaviours.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-8986 (URN)10.1080/09557571.2019.1623173 (DOI)
Available from: 2020-02-04 Created: 2020-02-04 Last updated: 2020-02-24Bibliographically approved
Nymalm, N. (2019). The Economics of Identity: is China the new ‘Japan Problem’ for the United States?. Journal of International Relations and Development, 22(4), 909-933
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Economics of Identity: is China the new ‘Japan Problem’ for the United States?
2019 (English)In: Journal of International Relations and Development, ISSN 1408-6980, E-ISSN 1581-1980, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 909-933Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The ‘rise of China’ ranks among the most widely addressed contemporary topics in the field of International Relations. The majority of studies focuses on questions of ‘power shifts’ from West to East—in particular from the US to China—commonly premised on assessments of China’s rapid economic growth. However, it is rarely taken into consideration that the last comparable debate was conducted only a few decades ago, when Japan was proclaimed the new ‘Number One’. The neglect is even more remarkable given the striking similarities in the US discourses on first Japan and then China as not only an ‘unfair economic player’, but also a ‘threat’ to US global preeminence. In turn, the similarities seem puzzling given the differences in the bilateral relationship between the US and Japan in the past, and the US and China more recently. This article analyses parallels in these discourses by taking a view that goes beyond the economy as material capabilities and interests common in research on ‘rising powers’. Instead, focusing on the role of identity, it contends that the similarities in articulating Japan and China as threats stem from them not adhering to the US model of liberal democratic capitalism, while being economically successful on their own terms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Palgrave Macmillan, 2019
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-8984 (URN)10.1057/s41268-017-0126-9 (DOI)
Available from: 2020-02-04 Created: 2020-02-04 Last updated: 2020-02-24Bibliographically approved
Nymalm, N. (2013). The end of the 'liberal theory of history'?: Dissecting the US Congress' discourse on China's currency policy. International Political Sociology, 7(4), 388-405
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The end of the 'liberal theory of history'?: Dissecting the US Congress' discourse on China's currency policy
2013 (English)In: International Political Sociology, ISSN 1749-5679, E-ISSN 1749-5687, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 388-405Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Over the last 10 years, economic issues related to currency policy have become the major ongoing dispute between China and the United States. Specifically, the US Congress has demanded a tougher policy to avert the negative consequences of “unfair” Chinese policies—in the form of a “manipulated currency”—for the US economy. Building on an analytical framework of discourse theory (DT)—and proposing a method for applying DT in empirical research—an investigation into congressional debates on the Chinese currency shows that the question is not a purely economic one, but rather that it reflects a dislocation of US identity as the vanguard of liberal-democratic capitalism. This dislocation involves changes to how “liberal” identity in the US Congress is articulated in relation to the role attributed to “illiberal” China, which in turn affects the formulation of US China policy in Congress.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2013
National Category
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-8978 (URN)10.1111/ips.12030 (DOI)
Available from: 2020-02-04 Created: 2020-02-04 Last updated: 2020-02-24Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7290-2909

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