Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Hollis, Simon
Publications (10 of 17) Show all publications
Hollis, S. (2018). Bridging International Relations with Disaster Studies: The case of disaster-conflict scholarship. Disasters. The Journal of Disaster Studies, Policy and Management, 42(1), 19-40
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bridging International Relations with Disaster Studies: The case of disaster-conflict scholarship
2018 (English)In: Disasters. The Journal of Disaster Studies, Policy and Management, ISSN 0361-3666, E-ISSN 1467-7717, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 19-40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

International relations and disaster studies have much to gain by thinking critically about their respective theoretical and epistemological assumptions. Yet, few studies to date have sought to assess the potential value of linking these two disciplines. This paper begins to address this short-fall by examining the relationship between disasters and conflict as a research sphere that intersects international relations and disaster studies. Through an analysis of whether or not disasters contribute to intranational and international conflict, this paper not only provides a review of the state of the art, but also serves to invite scholars to reflect on related concepts from other fields to strengthen their own approaches to the study of disasters in an international setting. An evaluation of the conceptual and theoretical contributions of each subject area provides useful heuristics for the development of disaster–conflict scholarship and encourages alternative modes of knowledge production through interdisciplinarity.

Keywords
conflict, disaster, interdisciplinarity, international relations, natural hazard, perspectivism, violence
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot krishantering och internationell samverkan
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-6440 (URN)10.1111/disa.12231 (DOI)28452162 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-01-03 Created: 2017-01-03 Last updated: 2017-12-15Bibliographically approved
Hollis, S. (2018). Global and local re-presentations of resilience in the Caribbean: the role of art in the construction of the self. Resilience - International Policies, Practices and Discourses, 6(1), 35-53
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Global and local re-presentations of resilience in the Caribbean: the role of art in the construction of the self
2018 (English)In: Resilience - International Policies, Practices and Discourses, ISSN 2169-3293, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 35-53Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The global diffusion and reification of resilience – as the innate acceptance of vulnerability and suffering – has become an increasingly common feature in global development and humanitarian discourses. The advocacy of Disaster Risk Reduction represents a central technique of this global ontology of resilience that aims to influence the individual, the society and the state. This article explores how this global worldview of resilience is received by local rationalities of resilience in the Caribbean. This is achieved by examining Caribbean art as a re-presentational form of identity that shapes distinct ontological understandings of insecurity and vulnerability, which subsequently affects the possibilities of subjectivisation which lead towards local creative resistance or a global consent of suffering.

Keywords
Resilience, Disaster Risk Reduction, Caribbean, culture, aesthetics, art
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot krishantering och internationell samverkan
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-6437 (URN)10.1080/21693293.2016.1198514 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-01-03 Created: 2017-01-03 Last updated: 2018-01-24Bibliographically approved
Hollis, S. (2017). Localized Development Gaps in Global Governance: The Case of Disaster Risk Reduction in Oceania. Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations, 23(1), 121-139
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Localized Development Gaps in Global Governance: The Case of Disaster Risk Reduction in Oceania
2017 (English)In: Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations, ISSN 1075-2846, E-ISSN 1942-6720, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 121-139Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Global framework agreements on Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) aim to reduce the vulnerability of states from the effects of natural hazards and guide international development strategies. The effects of these agreements have surely saved lives and buffered shocks to economic systems. Yet, there remains a gap between global aims and envisioned outcomes in local communities. This paper argues that cultural determinants of risk, which shape the reception and translation of ideas on DRR, must be taken seriously if international organizations wish to enhance their efficacy and reduce vulnerability. Elucidating the importance indigenous practices of resilience, time and governance have for the global diffusion of DRR can help to reduce this gap and encourage more effective development policy in the future.

National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot krishantering och internationell samverkan
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-6438 (URN)000394734300010 ()
Available from: 2017-01-03 Created: 2017-01-03 Last updated: 2018-06-29Bibliographically approved
Hollis, S. (2015). Preventing Disasters in Europe: Challenges and Opportunities for Translating Global Visions into Local Practices (1ed.). In: Bossong, Raphael & Hegemann, Hendrik (Ed.), European Civil Security Governance: Diversity and Cooperation in Crisis and Disaster Management (pp. 117-137). Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preventing Disasters in Europe: Challenges and Opportunities for Translating Global Visions into Local Practices
2015 (English)In: European Civil Security Governance: Diversity and Cooperation in Crisis and Disaster Management / [ed] Bossong, Raphael & Hegemann, Hendrik, Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, 1, p. 117-137Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Palgrave Macmillan, 2015 Edition: 1
Series
New Security Challenges
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot krishantering och internationell samverkan
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-7176 (URN)9781137481108 (ISBN)9781137481115 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-01-08 Created: 2018-01-08 Last updated: 2018-01-08Bibliographically approved
Hollis, S. (2015). The Role of Regional Organizations in Disaster Risk Management: A Strategy for Global Resilience. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Role of Regional Organizations in Disaster Risk Management: A Strategy for Global Resilience
2015 (English)Book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015. p. 242
Keywords
disaster management, risk management, international cooperation, disaster relief
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot krishantering och internationell samverkan
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-6449 (URN)978-1-137-43929-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-01-05 Created: 2017-01-05 Last updated: 2018-01-15Bibliographically approved
Hollis, S. (2014). Competing and Complimentary Discourses in Global Disaster Risk Management. Risk, Hazards & Crisis in Public Policy, 5(3), 342-363
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Competing and Complimentary Discourses in Global Disaster Risk Management
2014 (English)In: Risk, Hazards & Crisis in Public Policy, ISSN 1944-4079, E-ISSN 1944-4079, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 342-363Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article analyses the underlying structures that contribute to the boundaries of appropriate behavior in global Disaster Risk Management (DRM). Understood as a policy field committed to mitigating the effects of natural hazards and assisting states in responding to disasters, international dimensions of DRM have received increased attention by academics and practitioners. Yet, little reflection has been made on the ideational structures that define this field. Based on a discourse analysis on key texts, this study argues that three dominant categories—a humanitarian ethics of care, scientific rationality and sovereignty—demarcate the boundaries of cooperation on DRM. Understanding the relationship between these categories is considered vital for reflecting on the current and future trajectory of this important policy field.

National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot krishantering och internationell samverkan
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-7173 (URN)10.1002/rhc3.12063 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-01-08 Created: 2018-01-08 Last updated: 2018-01-08Bibliographically approved
Hollis, S. (2014). Disaster Risk Reduction in the Caribbean: Opportunities and Challenges for Achieving Greater Resilience. Caribbean Journal of International Relationships & Diplomacy, 2(4), 121-132
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disaster Risk Reduction in the Caribbean: Opportunities and Challenges for Achieving Greater Resilience
2014 (English)In: Caribbean Journal of International Relationships & Diplomacy, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 121-132Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

The Caribbean experience of natural hazards and disasters has continued to increase over the last half-century. The intensity and number of weather-related disasters combined with existing social, political and economic vulnerabilities form a complex arrangement that threatens the livelihoods of individuals and communities. Global attention to at-risk regions, such as the Caribbean and the Pacific, has intensified in the last decade as an array of international and regional actors have advocated a set of prescriptive action points based on the Hyogo Framework Programme for Action (HFA). As the decade of HFA draws to a close, and as the international community prepare to negotiate the post-HFA in March 2015, it is timely to ask whether the HFA has reached the societal level as its targeted audience. Based on extensive interviews with members of the international community, local disaster managers and intellectuals in the Caribbean region, this paper emphasises the limited success of the HFA and the importance of culture as a long-term strategy for ensuring a safer future.

National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot krishantering och internationell samverkan
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-7177 (URN)
Available from: 2018-01-08 Created: 2018-01-08 Last updated: 2018-01-08Bibliographically approved
Hollis, S. (2014). The Global Construction of EU Development Policy. Journal of European Integration, 36(6), 567-583
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Global Construction of EU Development Policy
2014 (English)In: Journal of European Integration, ISSN 0703-6337, E-ISSN 1477-2280, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 567-583Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

At the turn of the twentieth century, 191 countries agreed to realize the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The European Union (EU) has incorporated many of these goals into its development policies. However, the effect of the MDGs on the construction of EU development policy has not been achieved through a homogenous diffusion of global development norms, but through a heterogeneous process: some MDGs have had a greater impact on EU policy formation than others. By reconceptualizing the EU as a receiver of norms, this paper aims to locate the scope conditions of global norm convergence in EU development policy through a comparison of disaster risk reduction and urban development in slum dwellings. Informed through world society theory, the findings point to the importance of norm ‘theorization’ in explaining the scope conditions of norm diffusion.

Keywords
Development, slums, disaster, European Union, norms, diffusion
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot krishantering och internationell samverkan
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-7182 (URN)10.1080/07036337.2014.902943 (DOI)000344140700003 ()
Available from: 2018-01-09 Created: 2018-01-09 Last updated: 2018-06-28Bibliographically approved
Hollis, S. (2014). The global standardization of regional disaster risk management. Cambridge Review of International Affairs, 27(2), 319-338
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The global standardization of regional disaster risk management
2014 (English)In: Cambridge Review of International Affairs, ISSN 0955-7571, E-ISSN 1474-449X, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 319-338Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Natural disasters have become a heightened security issue in the last decade. Mitigating and responding to disasters, such as the 2004 tsunami in Southeast Asia and the 2011 earthquake in Japan, reflect a new security agenda that has spread across the globe and infiltrated most regional organizations. At first glance, the creation of regional programmes on disaster risk management (DRM) appears to be driven by the functional preferences of states. However, a comparison of ten regional organizations reveals some curious ambiguities. Despite different threat perceptions, financial budgets and geographical environments of regional organizations, a majority of states have formed DRM programmes that exhibit highly standardized features in terms of language, the referent points of protection and the apparent motivations for cooperation. World society theory is used to explain these striking similarities with reference to the global cultural system. This article also illustrates the analytical purchase of world society theory in understanding cooperation through regional organizations.

Keywords
World Society, Nation-State, Union
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot krishantering och internationell samverkan
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-4885 (URN)10.1080/09557571.2014.889085 (DOI)000338008500008 ()
Available from: 2014-09-25 Created: 2014-09-25 Last updated: 2017-06-14Bibliographically approved
Hollis, S. & Ekengren, M. (2013). Country Study: Norway. Försvarshögskolan (FHS)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Country Study: Norway
2013 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The Norwegian state has a long-standing tradition of protecting its citizens from a range of threats from natural disasters, infectious diseases, industrial accidents, critical infrastructure failure, to terrorist attacks. This case study provides a broad and detailed description on the main features of the modern Norwegian civil security system. It explains how it functions, it describes the system’s political and cultural context, and it addresses the changes that have occurred since the Oslo bombing and the Utøya shootings in 2011 July 22. The coordination of human and material resources to prevent, prepare, respond to, and recover from, various crises is constructed along three guiding principles of responsibility, decentralization, and conformity. This not only means that responsibility for crisis management should be at the lowest possible level, but that the state and its society must also operate under normal standards, regardless of the type or extent of a particular crisis. As this study shows, most areas of the civil security system are infused with these defining principles. This can be seen, for example, in the discussion on the cultural elements that inform Norwegian society, the production of legislation, or in operational procedures used in responding to crises. In addition to these areas, this study also provides detailed descriptions on Norway’s administrative and legal traditions, its external cooperative endeavours, as well as the way in which the private sector and citizens interact with civil security system. In order to further understand the system, this study investigates three quality measures based on the extent to which the system is effective, efficient, and legitimate. An annex is also included that depicts the principal descriptive features of the study, as well as a case study on the H1N1 virus. Set within the dark shadows of the events that took place on July 22 – that could have been avoided through existing security measures according to Norwegian state authorities – this study concludes by highlighting the need for an increase in vigilance and efficiency of the Norwegian civil security system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Försvarshögskolan (FHS), 2013. p. 41
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot krishantering och internationell samverkan; Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot strategi och säkerhetspolitik
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-7180 (URN)
Available from: 2018-01-08 Created: 2018-01-08 Last updated: 2018-01-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications