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Doeser, Fredrik
Publications (10 of 11) Show all publications
Doeser, F. (2018). Historical experiences, strategic culture, and strategic behavior: Poland in the anti-ISIS coalition. Defence Studies, 18(4), 454-473
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Historical experiences, strategic culture, and strategic behavior: Poland in the anti-ISIS coalition
2018 (English)In: Defence Studies, ISSN 1470-2436, E-ISSN 1743-9698, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 454-473Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article contributes to an explanation of why Poland, after a period of almost two years’ hesitation, decided to dispatch military forces to the United States-led coalition against the Islamic State in June 2016. The Polish case is examined by applying the concept of strategic culture, taking into account a state’s core military strategic beliefs and the historical experiences on which these beliefs are based. The case study shows that strategic culture shaped the Polish decision-making on the coalition, by predisposing the decision-makers toward a typical Polish behavior in international military operations, namely to exchange security benefits with important allies. The article also has implications for the general study of strategic culture, by specifying the relationship between historical experiences and strategic culture.

Keywords
Poland, Islamic State, strategic culture shaped
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Krigsvetenskap
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-8193 (URN)10.1080/14702436.2018.1502038 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-10-15 Created: 2018-10-15 Last updated: 2019-02-11Bibliographically approved
Doeser, F. & Eidenfalk, J. (2018). Using strategic culture to understand participation in expeditionary operations: Australia, Poland, and the coalition against the Islamic State. Contemporary Security Policy, 40(1), 4-29
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using strategic culture to understand participation in expeditionary operations: Australia, Poland, and the coalition against the Islamic State
2018 (English)In: Contemporary Security Policy, ISSN 1352-3260, E-ISSN 1743-8764, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 4-29Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article investigates how strategic culture influenced the decision-making of Australia and Poland regarding the global coalition against the Islamic State. In the coalition, Australia has followed its tradition of active participation in United States-led operations, while Poland has embarked on a more cautious line, thereby breaking with its previous policy of active participation. The article examines how Australian and Polish responses to the coalition were shaped by five cultural elements: dominant threat perception, core task of the armed forces, strategic partners, experiences of participating in coalitions of the willing, and approach to the international legality of expeditionary operations. It finds that Australia and Poland differed on all five elements but that the major differences are found in dominant threat perception and core task of the armed forces.

Keywords
Australia, coalition against the Islamic State, expeditionary operations, Poland, strategic culture
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Krigsvetenskap
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-7608 (URN)10.1080/13523260.2018.1469709 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-06-21 Created: 2018-06-21 Last updated: 2019-01-10Bibliographically approved
Doeser, F. (2017). Strategic Culture, Domestic Politics, and Foreign Policy: Finland’s Decision To Refrain From Operation Unified Protector. Foreign Policy Analysis, 13(3), 741-759
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Strategic Culture, Domestic Politics, and Foreign Policy: Finland’s Decision To Refrain From Operation Unified Protector
2017 (English)In: Foreign Policy Analysis, ISSN 1743-8586, E-ISSN 1743-8594, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 741-759Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article integrates literature on strategic culture with literature on the domestic politics of foreign policy, illustrating how the interaction of culture and domestic political calculation can influence government foreign policy on participation in international military operations. Empirically, the article investigates the decision made by the Government of Finland to refrain from participation in the military intervention in Libya in March–April 2011. The Finnish decision-making illustrates that domestic politics, in particular the factor of election timing, can strengthen the feeling among decision-makers that they should follow the country’s strategic culture. The article ends with theorization on the domestic political conditions under which decision-makers are more or less likely to deviate from strategic culture.

Keywords
Public-Opinion, War, Behavior, Security, Context, Iraq
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Krigsvetenskap
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-7110 (URN)10.1093/fpa/orx001 (DOI)000407100500012 ()
Available from: 2017-11-23 Created: 2017-11-23 Last updated: 2018-06-29Bibliographically approved
Doeser, F. (2016). Finland, Sweden and Operation Unified Protector: The impact of strategic culture. Comparative Strategy, 35(4), 284-297
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Finland, Sweden and Operation Unified Protector: The impact of strategic culture
2016 (English)In: Comparative Strategy, ISSN 0149-5933, E-ISSN 1521-0448, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 284-297Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article investigates the Swedish decision to participate in Operation Unified Protector in Libya and the Finnish decision to refrain from the same operation. It takes as its theoretical point of departure the concept of strategic culture and argues that differences in the strategic culture of the two countries contributed to the differences in behavior toward the Libya intervention. The Finnish and Swedish strategic cultures differ with respect to the core tasks of the armed forces, willingness to use force, and with respect to what types of operations and organizational frameworks Finland and Sweden find it appropriate to participate in.

National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Krigsvetenskap
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-6338 (URN)10.1080/01495933.2016.1222842 (DOI)
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, 2012.0178
Available from: 2016-11-16 Created: 2016-11-16 Last updated: 2018-01-16Bibliographically approved
Doeser, F. (2016). From Enthusiasm to Reluctance: Poland and International Military Operations. In: Malena Britz (Ed.), European Participation in International Operations: The Role of Strategic Culture (pp. 123-149). Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From Enthusiasm to Reluctance: Poland and International Military Operations
2016 (English)In: European Participation in International Operations: The Role of Strategic Culture / [ed] Malena Britz, Palgrave Macmillan, 2016, p. 123-149Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Palgrave Macmillan, 2016
Series
New Security Challenges
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Krigsvetenskap
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-6339 (URN)9783319397580 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-11-16 Created: 2016-11-16 Last updated: 2017-01-13Bibliographically approved
Doeser, F. & Eidenfalk, J. (2016). Ignoring public opinion: The Australian and Polish decisions to go to war in Iraq. Cambridge Review of International Affairs, 29(2), 562-580
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ignoring public opinion: The Australian and Polish decisions to go to war in Iraq
2016 (English)In: Cambridge Review of International Affairs, ISSN 0955-7571, E-ISSN 1474-449X, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 562-580Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article investigates why the governments of Australia and Poland decided to contribute military forces to the United States led invasion of Iraq in March 2003 when a majority of Australian and Polish citizens were opposed to national involvement in the invasion. The objective of the article is to increase understanding of the conditions under which governments ignore the public in their foreign policymaking. The article examines the explanatory power of four intervening variables: issue salience, elite debate, timing of the next election and the importance assigned to international gains by the government. On the basis of the Direct Method of Agreement, the article concludes that government perceptions of international gains and the timing of the next election were potentially necessary factors for the outcomes of the cases, while issue salience and elite debate were not necessary conditions. A distant election may, thus, provide sufficient electoral protection for a government that conducts a foreign policy to which the public is opposed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2016
National Category
Political Science Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Krigsvetenskap
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-5786 (URN)10.1080/09557571.2015.1058616 (DOI)000384446100012 ()
Available from: 2016-01-12 Created: 2016-01-12 Last updated: 2018-06-29Bibliographically approved
Doeser, F. (2014). Sweden’s Libya decision: A case of humanitarian intervention. International Politics, 51(2), 196-213
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sweden’s Libya decision: A case of humanitarian intervention
2014 (English)In: International Politics, ISSN 1384-5748, E-ISSN 1740-3898, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 196-213Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article investigates why Sweden decided to participate in the enforcement of the no-fly zone over Libya in 2011. The Swedish decision was the result of a combination of factors, including feelings of altruism, the legal basis for the operation, the involvement of North Atlantic Treaty Organization in the operation, the political power play in the Swedish parliament and Sweden’s availability of military resources. The case study relies on a multitude of different sources, such as government reports, speeches and remarks, parliamentary records, media coverage, blog entries, secondary sources, and interviews with high-level civil servants.

Keywords
foreign policy, humanitarian intervention, Libya, no-fly zone, Sweden
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Krigsvetenskap
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-5149 (URN)10.1057/ip.2014.3 (DOI)
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2015-01-13 Created: 2015-01-13 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Doeser, F. (2014). Sweden's Participation in Operation Unified Protector: Obligations and Interests. International Peacekeeping, 21(5), 642-657
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sweden's Participation in Operation Unified Protector: Obligations and Interests
2014 (English)In: International Peacekeeping, ISSN 1353-3312, E-ISSN 1743-906X, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 642-657Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article examines the necessary conditions behind the decision made by the Government of Sweden to participate with fighter jets in the monitoring of the no-fly zone over Libya in March 2011. The article identifies five explanatory factors whose presence was necessary for Sweden's military contribution: a feeling of moral obligation to intervene on the part of the government; the international legal foundation for the operation; strong leadership provided by NATO; broad parliamentary support; and the availability of military capabilities.

National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Krigsvetenskap
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-5150 (URN)10.1080/13533312.2014.963325 (DOI)000345270400004 ()
Available from: 2015-01-13 Created: 2015-01-13 Last updated: 2018-06-29Bibliographically approved
Doeser, F. (2013). Leader-driven foreign-policy change: Denmark and the Persian Gulf War. International Political Science Review, 34(5), 582-597
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Leader-driven foreign-policy change: Denmark and the Persian Gulf War
2013 (English)In: International Political Science Review, ISSN 0192-5121, E-ISSN 1460-373X, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 582-597Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In contrast to most previous research on foreign-policy change, this article investigates how an individual decision-maker can have an impact on major changes in foreign policy. The article takes as its theoretical point of departure the concept of leader-driven change, which focuses on the determined efforts of a political leader to change policy. Empirically, the article investigates the change that occurred in Denmark’s foreign policy when its government decided to participate in the United Nations sanctions against Iraq in August 1990. The article finds that the foreign minister was the main initiator of the policy change, that his personal characteristics played a decisive role, and that the Gulf crisis created a window of opportunity for the foreign minister to initiate the change in policy. In implementing the policy change, however, the foreign minister could not act independently, since he needed the support of other political actors. On the basis of these empirical      findings, the article suggests a new theory of foreign-policy change.

National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-5146 (URN)10.1177/0192512112473027 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-01-13 Created: 2015-01-13 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Doeser, F. & Eidenfalk, J. (2013). The importance of windows of opportunity for foreign policy change. International Area Studies Review, 16(4), 390-406
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The importance of windows of opportunity for foreign policy change
2013 (English)In: International Area Studies Review, ISSN 2233-8659, E-ISSN 2049-1123, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 390-406Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article emphasizes how individual decision-makers and their perceptions of windows of opportunity can play a decisive role for major changes in the foreign policy of states by conducting two case studies. The first case is the change that occurred in Denmark’s foreign policy in August 1990 when its government dispatched a warship to the Persian Gulf to participate in the monitoring of the United Nations sanctions against Iraq. The second case is the change that occurred in Australia’s foreign policy in April–May 2003 when its government abandoned Australia’s long-standing “hands-off” approach toward Solomon Islands by leading a multinational military intervention. The article demonstrates that individual decision-makers, with a long-standing desire to change policy, perceived structural changes as a window of opportunity for initiating the desired policy changes. The article concludes that, had it not been for these particular individuals, and their perceptions of the world around them, events would most likely have unfolded in a different way

Keywords
Australia, Denmark, foreign policy change, individual decision-makers, perception, window of opportunity
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-5148 (URN)10.1177/2233865913512117 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-01-13 Created: 2015-01-13 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
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