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Morales-Simfors, Nury
Publications (2 of 2) Show all publications
Bundschuh, J., Maity, J. P., Mushtaq, S., Vithanage, M., Seneweera, S., Schneider, J., . . . Chen, C.-Y. (2017). Medical geology in the framework of the sustainable development goals. Science of the Total Environment, 581, 87-104
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Medical geology in the framework of the sustainable development goals
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2017 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 581, p. 87-104Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Exposure to geogenic contaminants (GCs) such as metal(loid)s, radioactive metals and isotopes as well as transuraniums occurring naturally in geogenic sources (rocks, minerals) can negatively impact on environmental and human health. The GCs are released into the environment by natural biogeochemical processes within the near-surface environments and/or by anthropogenic activities such as mining and hydrocarbon exploitation as well as exploitation of geothermal resources. They can contaminate soil, water, air and biota and subsequently enter the food chain with often serious health impacts which are mostly underestimated and poorly recognized. Global population explosion and economic growth and the associated increase in demand for water, energy, food, and mineral resources result in accelerated release of GCs globally. The emerging science of "medical geology" assesses the complex relationships between geo-environmental factors and their impacts on humans and environments and is related to the majority of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals in the 2030 Agenda of the United Nations for Sustainable Development. In this paper, we identify multiple lines of evidence for the role of GCs in the incidence of diseases with as yet unknown etiology (causation). Integrated medical geology promises a more holistic understanding of the occurrence, mobility, bioavailability, bio-accessibility, exposure and transfer mechanisms of GCs to the food-chain and humans, and the related ecotoxicological impacts and health effects. Scientific evidence based on this approach will support adaptive solutions for prevention, preparedness and response regarding human and environmental health impacts originating from exposure to GCs.

Keywords
Medical geology, Geogenic contaminants, Toxic trace elements, Public health, Water resources, Food chain
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Military Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-8011 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.11.208 (DOI)000394635300010 ()28062106 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-06-29 Created: 2018-06-29 Last updated: 2019-08-26Bibliographically approved
Morales-Simfors, N., Dulanya, Z. & Sivertun, Å. (2015). Structural and Stratigraphic Controls of Malawi's Hotsprings: a Review. In: Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2015 Melbourne, Australia, 19-25 April 2015: . Paper presented at World Geothermal Congress 2015 Melbourne, Australia, 19-25 April 2015. Bochum, Germany: International Geothermal Association
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Structural and Stratigraphic Controls of Malawi's Hotsprings: a Review
2015 (English)In: Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2015 Melbourne, Australia, 19-25 April 2015, Bochum, Germany: International Geothermal Association , 2015Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Active continental divergent zones such as those in the East African Rift System (EARS) hold significant potential for commercially exploitable geothermal resources. Evaluating these zones and characterizing the structural and stratigraphic controls may give insights of the most favourable locations for geothermal activity in a particular area. Due to the geological setting in the western branch of the EARS, several surface manifestations of geothermal energy mostly in the form of hotsprings have been found throughout Malawi. According to our results it seems that there is a strong correlation between the strike of the hotsprings, rock type, regional faulting and the seismic rupture in 2009. However, the country’s full potential has not been evaluated despite these hotspring manifestations throughout this rift segment. Those hotsprings with a high probability of containing easily extractable, commercially viable energy have still to be re-evaluated in order to locate the most favourable areas for geothermal exploration in the area. To achieve this, more local studies are necessary in order to understand better the stratigraphic and structural controls of the hotsprings in the studied area, in order to attract local and international investors. Therefore, the objective of this paper is to give an overview of the geological, structural, geochemical and seismic characteristics in northern Malawi for the exploration of geothermal energy. Once explored, this resource could become crucial in the country’s future development and economy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bochum, Germany: International Geothermal Association, 2015
Series
World Geothermal Congress
Keywords
Malawi, hotsprings, potential, geothermal
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Military Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-5815 (URN)
Conference
World Geothermal Congress 2015 Melbourne, Australia, 19-25 April 2015
Available from: 2016-01-14 Created: 2016-01-14 Last updated: 2019-08-26Bibliographically approved
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