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Hagström, Linus, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7495-055X
Publications (10 of 39) Show all publications
Hagström, L. (2019). Becoming a traitor. Life Writing, 1-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Becoming a traitor
2019 (English)In: Life Writing, ISSN 1448-4528, E-ISSN 1751-2964, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

In this autobiographical essay, I narrate my experience of being positioned in public as naive in my profession and a traitor to my country after publishing an op-ed in Sweden’s largest daily newspaper, in which I argued that Sweden should not join NATO — the transatlantic military alliance. Some of the negative reactions came from within my own workplace. I had just been promoted to Professor at the Swedish Defence University and colleagues thought I had also betrayed them and the university by publishing the piece. In this essay, I disclose some of the reactions I encountered but, more importantly, I try to understand the effect they had on me, recounting my own inner dialogue of shame and resistance. At times I worried that I lacked expertise or even secretly harboured an affinity with the country that is now seen to motivate a Swedish NATO membership — i.e. Russia. At other times, I tried to turn the tables on the stigmatisers, claiming that it was they who had to change. While I work in a highly militarised environment, I think the fear of social death and professional shame I explore in this essay has broader resonance.

Keywords
resistance, security, shame, traitor
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot strategi och säkerhetspolitik
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-8712 (URN)10.1080/14484528.2019.1644986 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-08-16 Created: 2019-08-16 Last updated: 2019-09-10Bibliographically approved
Hagström, L. & Nordin, A. (2019). China's “Politics of Harmony” and the Quest for Soft Power in International Politics. International Studies Review, 1-19, Article ID viz023.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>China's “Politics of Harmony” and the Quest for Soft Power in International Politics
2019 (English)In: International Studies Review, ISSN 1521-9488, E-ISSN 1468-2486, p. 1-19, article id viz023Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This article engages with China's “politics of harmony” to investigate the dangers and possibilities of soft power as a concept and practice. Chinese sources claim that China will be able to exercise soft power due to its tradition of thinking about harmony. Indeed, the concept of harmony looms large in Chinese soft power campaigns, which differentiate China's own harmonious soft power from the allegedly disharmonious hard power of other great powers—in particular Western powers and Japan. Yet, similarly dichotomizing harmony discourses have been employed precisely in the West and Japan. In all three cases, such harmony discourses set a rhetorical trap, forcing audiences to empathize and identify with the “harmonious” self or risk being violently “harmonized.” There is no doubt that the soft power of harmony is coercive. More importantly, the present article argues that it has legitimized and enabled oppressive, homogenizing, and bellicose expansionism and rule in the West and Japan. A similarly structured exercise of soft power may enable violence in and beyond China, too. Ultimately, however, we argue that China's own tradition of thinking about harmony may help us to theorize how soft power might be exercised in less antagonistic and violent ways.

Keywords
China, harmony, Japan, power, soft power, the West
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot strategi och säkerhetspolitik
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-8632 (URN)10.1093/isr/viz023 (DOI)
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, MMW2013.0162
Available from: 2019-06-19 Created: 2019-06-19 Last updated: 2019-09-10Bibliographically approved
Hagström, L. (2019). Long live pacifism!: narrative power and Japan’spacifist model. Cambridge Review of International Affairs, 32(4), 502-520
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long live pacifism!: narrative power and Japan’spacifist model
2019 (English)In: Cambridge Review of International Affairs, ISSN 0955-7571, E-ISSN 1474-449X, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 502-520Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

International relations research acknowledges that states can have different security policies but neglects the fact that ‘models’ may exist in the security policy realm. This article suggests that it is useful to think about models, which it argues can become examples for emulation or be undermined through narrative power. It illustrates the argument by analysing Japan’s pacifism—an alternative approach to security policy which failed to become an internationally popular model and, despite serving the country well for many years, has even lost its appeal in Japan. Conventional explanations suggest that Japan’s pacifist policies were ‘abnormal’, and that the Japanese eventually realized this. By contrast, this article argues that narratives undermined Japan’s pacifism by mobilizing deep-seated beliefs about what is realistic and unrealistic in international politics, and launches a counter-narrative that could help make pacifism a more credible model in world politics.

Keywords
Pacifism, narrative, power, Japan, security
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot strategi och säkerhetspolitik
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-8633 (URN)10.1080/09557571.2019.1623174 (DOI)
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, MMW2013.0162
Available from: 2019-06-19 Created: 2019-06-19 Last updated: 2019-08-13Bibliographically approved
Hagström, L. & Gustafsson, K. (2019). Narrative power: how storytelling shapes East Asian international politics. Cambridge Review of International Affairs, 32(4), 387-406
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Narrative power: how storytelling shapes East Asian international politics
2019 (English)In: Cambridge Review of International Affairs, ISSN 0955-7571, E-ISSN 1474-449X, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 387-406Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We are living at a time when people appear to have become more aware of the power of narratives in international politics. Understanding how narratives exercise power is therefore more pertinent than ever. This special issue develops the concept of narrative power for international relations research by focusing on East Asia—the region that has been at the centre of debates about international power shifts since the 1990s. This introduction seeks to elucidate and define four key binary distinctions: (a) narrative power as understood from the perspective of an individualist versus a narrative ontology; (b) narrative power as explanandum versus explanans; (c) narrative power as more prone to continuity or change; and (d) the scholar as a detached observer of narrative power versus the scholar as a narrative entrepreneur and a potential wielder of power. Informed by the individual contributions, the introduction demonstrates how and with what implications research on narrative power can negotiate and traverse these binary distinctions.

Keywords
narrative, power, East Asia, security, international politics
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot strategi och säkerhetspolitik
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-8711 (URN)10.1080/09557571.2019.1623498 (DOI)
Projects
Power shift in East Asia: Soft power analyses
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, MMW2013.0162
Available from: 2019-08-16 Created: 2019-08-16 Last updated: 2019-08-23
Hagström, L. & Isaksson, E. (2019). Pacifist Identity, Civics Textbooks, and the Opposition to Japan's Security Legislation. Journal of Japanese Studies, 45(1), 31-55
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pacifist Identity, Civics Textbooks, and the Opposition to Japan's Security Legislation
2019 (English)In: Journal of Japanese Studies, ISSN 0095-6848, E-ISSN 1549-4721, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 31-55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article examines Japanese processes of self-formation as reflected in junior high school civics textbooks, comparing books published in 1990 and 2012. It demonstrates surprising continuity in how books from the two years construct a pacifist self in sharp contrast to Japan's prewar and wartime belligerence. We argue that this kind of antagonistic temporal othering has continued to socialize Japanese students into a "peace identity" and helps to explain the strong grassroots opposition to the Japanese government's 2015 announcement of laws to back up its position that Japan can exercise collective self-defense.

Keywords
identity, security, Japan, civics textbooks
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot strategi och säkerhetspolitik
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-8430 (URN)10.1353/jjs.2019.0002 (DOI)
Projects
Power shift in East Asia: Soft power analyses
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, MMW2013.0162
Available from: 2019-03-01 Created: 2019-03-01 Last updated: 2019-03-27Bibliographically approved
Hagström, L. & Pan, C. (2019). Traversing the Soft/Hard Power Binary: The Case of the Sino-Japanese Territorial Dispute. Review of International Studies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Traversing the Soft/Hard Power Binary: The Case of the Sino-Japanese Territorial Dispute
2019 (English)In: Review of International Studies, ISSN 0260-2105, E-ISSN 1469-9044Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Soft power and hard power are conceptualised in International Relations as empirically and normatively dichotomous, and practically opposite – one intangible, attractive, and legitimate, the other tangible, coercive, and less legitimate. This article critiques this binary conceptualisation, arguing that it is discursively constructed with and for the construction of Self and Other. It further demonstrates that practices commonly labelled and understood as soft power and hard power are closely interconnected. Best understood as ‘representational force’ and ‘physical force’ respectively, soft and hard power intertwine through the operation of productive and disciplinary forms of power. We illustrate this argument by analysing the Sino-Japanese dispute over the Diaoyu/Senkaku Islands. Both governments exercise representational force in constructing their respective versions of events and Self/Other. The soft/hard power binary itself plays a performative role as the Self is typically associated with soft power and the Other with hard power. The operation of productive power, moreover, privileges the attractiveness of the former and the repellence of the latter, and disciplinary power physically enforces these distinctions on subjects in both states. Finally, reinforced Self/Other distinctions legitimise preparations for violence against the Other on both sides, thus exposing how fundamentally entangled soft and hard power are in practice.

Keywords
Diaoyu/Senkaku Islands, disciplinary power, productive power, Sino-Japanese relations, soft power
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot strategi och säkerhetspolitik
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-8729 (URN)10.1017/S0260210519000251 (DOI)
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, MMW2013.0162
Available from: 2019-08-28 Created: 2019-08-28 Last updated: 2019-09-10Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, K. & Hagström, L. (2018). What Is the Point?: Teaching Graduate Students how to Construct Political Science Research Puzzles. European Political Science, 17(4), 634-648
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What Is the Point?: Teaching Graduate Students how to Construct Political Science Research Puzzles
2018 (English)In: European Political Science, ISSN 1680-4333, E-ISSN 1682-0983, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 634-648Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

One of the key challenges graduate students face is how to come up with a good rationale for their theses. Unfortunately, the methods literature in and beyond political science does not provide much advice on this important issue. While focusing on how to conduct research, this literature has largely neglected the question of why a study should be undertaken. The limited discussions that can be found suggest that new research is justified if it (1) fills a ‘gap’; (2) addresses an important real-world problem; and/or (3) is methodologically rigorous. This article discusses the limitations of these rationales. Then, it proposes that research puzzles are more useful for clarifying the nature and importance of a contribution to existing research, and hence a better way of justifying new research. The article also explores and clarifies what research puzzles are, and begins to devise a method for constructing them out of the vague ideas and questions that often trigger a research process. 

Keywords
method, political science, problematization, research puzzles, research design
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot strategi och säkerhetspolitik
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-7347 (URN)10.1057/s41304-017-0130-y (DOI)
Available from: 2018-03-20 Created: 2018-03-20 Last updated: 2019-01-29Bibliographically approved
Hagström, L., Weissmann, M. & Hanssen, U. (2017). Allt bör göras för att bygga relationer med Nordkorea. Dagens Nyheter
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Allt bör göras för att bygga relationer med Nordkorea
2017 (Swedish)In: Dagens Nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447Article in journal, News item (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Keywords
Nordkorea, sanktioner, Asien, Kina, USA
National Category
Globalisation Studies Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Krigsvetenskap
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-7089 (URN)
Available from: 2017-11-06 Created: 2017-11-06 Last updated: 2019-09-09Bibliographically approved
Hanssen, U., Hagström, L. & Weissmann, M. (2017). Tøffere press og sanksjoner mot Nord-Korea er ineffektivt og kanskje også kontraproduktivt. Verdens gang, Article ID 9 oktober.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tøffere press og sanksjoner mot Nord-Korea er ineffektivt og kanskje også kontraproduktivt
2017 (Norwegian)In: Verdens gang, ISSN 0806-0894, article id 9 oktoberArticle in journal, News item (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Krigsvetenskap; Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot strategi och säkerhetspolitik
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-7351 (URN)
Available from: 2018-03-20 Created: 2018-03-20 Last updated: 2019-03-29Bibliographically approved
Hagström, L., Bremberg, N. & Holmberg, A. (Eds.). (2016). Att forska: praktiker och roller inom samhällsvetenskapen. Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Att forska: praktiker och roller inom samhällsvetenskapen
2016 (Swedish)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag, 2016. p. 301
Keywords
samhällsvetenskaplig forskning
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot strategi och säkerhetspolitik
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-6103 (URN)9789173317696 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-04-27 Created: 2016-04-27 Last updated: 2017-01-10Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7495-055X

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