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Olsson, Eva-Karin, Professor
Publications (10 of 54) Show all publications
Olsson, E.-K., Wagnsson, C. & Hammargård, K. (2019). The use of political communication by international organizations: the case of EU and NATO (1ed.). In: Bjola, Corneliu; Pamment, James (Ed.), Countering online propaganda and violent extremism: the dark side of digital diplomacy (pp. 66-80). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The use of political communication by international organizations: the case of EU and NATO
2019 (English)In: Countering online propaganda and violent extremism: the dark side of digital diplomacy / [ed] Bjola, Corneliu; Pamment, James, London: Routledge, 2019, 1, p. 66-80Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2019 Edition: 1
Series
Routledge New Diplomacy Studies
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot krishantering och internationell samverkan; Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot strategi och säkerhetspolitik
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-8221 (URN)978-1-138-57862-3 (ISBN)978-1-138-57863-0 (ISBN)978-1-351-26408-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-11-08 Created: 2018-11-08 Last updated: 2019-01-16Bibliographically approved
Olsson, E.-K. & Verbeek, B. (2018). International Organisations and crisis management: Do crises enable or constrain IO agency?. Journal of International Relations and Development, 21(2), 275-299
Open this publication in new window or tab >>International Organisations and crisis management: Do crises enable or constrain IO agency?
2018 (English)In: Journal of International Relations and Development, ISSN 1408-6980, E-ISSN 1581-1980, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 275-299Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article seeks to bridge the gap between the literature on international organisations (IO) and the field of crisis management (CM) by focusing on two themes: how crisis conditions lead organisations to centralise decision-making and how this subsequently affects an international organisation’s autonomy. We do this based on two dimensions inspired by the CM literature, that is, the degree of the perceived time pressure and the precrisis legal institutional framework. The plausibility of the analytical framework is assessed on the basis of three cases: the WHO’s dealing with the SARS crisis; the European Commission’s dealing with the Mad Cow Disease crisis; and the UN’s handling of the humanitarian crisis in the Great Lakes region. The results show that the perceived time pressure affected IO autonomy in so far as higher time pressure that rendered IO autonomy stronger, whereas with regard to the institutional framework no stringent pattern could be seen. Moreover, based on our findings, we propose that IO autonomy in crisis situations also depends on the framing of an issue in terms on impartiality, on the extent to which the IO in question is subject to politicisation, as well as on the degree to which it possesses specific technical expertise.

Keywords
BSE, crisis management, international organisations, policy autonomy, Rwanda, SARS
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot krishantering och internationell samverkan
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-6403 (URN)10.1057/s41268-016-0071-z (DOI)000436615700002 ()
Available from: 2016-12-19 Created: 2016-12-19 Last updated: 2018-08-08Bibliographically approved
Olsson, E.-K. (2017). How Journalists Portray Political Leaders: The Personalization of Prime Ministers and the Connection to Party Affiliation in Swedish News Coverage. In: Birgitte Kjos Fonn, Harald Hornmoen, Nathalie Hyde-Clarke, and Yngve Benestad Hågvar (Ed.), Putting a Face on It: Individual Exposure and Subjectivity in Journalism (pp. 99-119). Cappelen Damm Akademisk / NOASP
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How Journalists Portray Political Leaders: The Personalization of Prime Ministers and the Connection to Party Affiliation in Swedish News Coverage
2017 (English)In: Putting a Face on It: Individual Exposure and Subjectivity in Journalism / [ed] Birgitte Kjos Fonn, Harald Hornmoen, Nathalie Hyde-Clarke, and Yngve Benestad Hågvar, Cappelen Damm Akademisk / NOASP , 2017, p. 99-119Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Journalists not only represent political leaders in terms of their policies and political competence. The personalities and private lives of leaders have also become an important component in mediated stories and narratives crucial for voter identifi-cation and interest. This chapter explores how the Swedish press reports on prime ministers’ social backgrounds, personal appearance and leadership characteristics in relation to party affiliation. The empirical material consists of news reporting on four former Swedish prime ministers: two from the Swedish Social Democratic Party; and two from the Moderate Party. The findings show that it is not only party affiliation that is of interest to journalists in reporting on prime ministers. Broader societal trends of what it means to be a politician in a certain time and era also influence reporting.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cappelen Damm Akademisk / NOASP, 2017
Keywords
personalization, political journalism, Sweden, narrative, personalities
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot krishantering och internationell samverkan
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-7183 (URN)10.23865/noasp.28 (DOI)9788202589523 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-01-09 Created: 2018-01-09 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Konow Lund, M. & Olsson, E.-K. (2017). News Frames and Global Terrorism Coverage in the UK and Norway: Context and Consequences for Humanitarian Issues (1ed.). In: Robin Andersen and Purnaka L. de Silva (Ed.), The Routledge Companion To Media and Humanitarian Action: (pp. 221-230). Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>News Frames and Global Terrorism Coverage in the UK and Norway: Context and Consequences for Humanitarian Issues
2017 (English)In: The Routledge Companion To Media and Humanitarian Action / [ed] Robin Andersen and Purnaka L. de Silva, Routledge, 2017, 1, p. 221-230Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This article examines the potential of history for framing acts of terrorism, such as the July 5, 2005 British and the July 22,2011 Norwegian attacks, in the aftermath of September 11, 2011. It focuses in particular on the impact of historical analogies for creating meaning and framing new reporting at both local and global levels. In both caseslocal frames of reference and meaning addressed citizens’ emotional and communal needs, such as solace, a sense of historical legacy, and identity concerns. The global frame of reference differed. In the British case, historical analogies were foremost means of connecting that terror event to the broader “war on terror frame,” which facilitated the identification of motives and policy responses. In the Norwegian case, no such analogies existed, which meant that history was unable to provide a contextual understanding. In short, historical analogies can serve to bring order to chaos but also limit other explanations and arguments and, as such, hamper knowledge crucial in creating informed publics. Yet, to a large extent analogies are nationally contextualized. In order for journalistic accounts to create meaning and comfort for global audiences, stronger efforts should be made to communicate such values by using inclusive, comprehensible and relevant global analogies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2017 Edition: 1
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot krishantering och internationell samverkan
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-7185 (URN)10.4324/9781315538129.ch18 (DOI)9781138688575 (ISBN)9781315538129 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-01-09 Created: 2018-01-09 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Konow Lund, M. & Olsson, E.-K. (2017). Social Media’s Challenge to Journalistic Norms and Values during a Terror Attack. Digital Journalism, 5(9), 1192-1204
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social Media’s Challenge to Journalistic Norms and Values during a Terror Attack
2017 (English)In: Digital Journalism, ISSN 2167-0811, E-ISSN 2167-082X, Vol. 5, no 9, p. 1192-1204Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Over the past decade, the frequency of terror attacks around the world has increased. In the context of the 22 July 2011 terror attacks in Norway, social media use by citizens, and even victims, became an essential feature of reporting. Social media confronted the legacy media's way of covering crisis events. It raised questions about traditional journalism's ability to handle audience's as, not only news consumers, but also producers. In the present article, we look at the ways in which the professional norms and values of traditional journalism are specifically challenged by social media use in times of terror, using the 22 July 2011 attacks as a case study. We find that Norwegian journalists initially held to their professional roles, and to the classic self-representational principles of journalism, including objectivity, autonomy and immediacy. When they integrated social media into their traditional platforms and modes of coverage, they framed it as a "source" of sorts. As the 22 July 2011 event coverage became more focused on the collective grief felt by the nation, in turn, the traditional journalistic principles of objectivity and autonomy became less relevant, enabling yet more audience participation and social media use in relation to the attack.

Keywords
22 July 2011 terror attacks, journalistic norms and values, social media, terror
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot krishantering och internationell samverkan
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-7186 (URN)10.1080/21670811.2016.1243990 (DOI)000418497400006 ()
Available from: 2018-01-09 Created: 2018-01-09 Last updated: 2018-06-29Bibliographically approved
Konow Lund, M., Bech, I. & Olsson, E.-K. (2017). Work First, Feel Later: How News Workers Reflect on Subjective Choices During a Terror Attack. In: Birgitte Kjos Fonn, Harald Hornmoen, Nathalie Hyde-Clarke and Yngve Benestad Hågvar (Ed.), Putting a Face on It: Individual Exposure and Subjectivity in Journalism (pp. 309-327). Cappelen Damm Akademisk / NOASP
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Work First, Feel Later: How News Workers Reflect on Subjective Choices During a Terror Attack
2017 (English)In: Putting a Face on It: Individual Exposure and Subjectivity in Journalism / [ed] Birgitte Kjos Fonn, Harald Hornmoen, Nathalie Hyde-Clarke and Yngve Benestad Hågvar, Cappelen Damm Akademisk / NOASP , 2017, p. 309-327Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In journalism studies, the discussion of objectivity as a strategic ritual is long stand-ing, while the impact of subjectivity and emotion upon journalism has received much less attention. During terror events, journalists’ notion of objectivity as a strategy is likely to be challenged due to unexpected autonomy. In order to explore how this unfolds, we have interviewed 24 journalists in three different news organ-isations shortly after the Norwegian terror attack in 2011, where 77 people were killed. Studies of what journalists experience during a terror attack, and how they reflect upon their experiences, are scarce. The present study addresses this gap, and in particular looks at how news workers deal with dilemmas where their percep-tions of professionalism are challenged.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cappelen Damm Akademisk / NOASP, 2017
Keywords
22 July terrorism, Norway, subjectivity, journalists
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot krishantering och internationell samverkan
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-7184 (URN)10.23865/noasp.28 (DOI)9788202589523 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-01-09 Created: 2018-01-09 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Olsson, E.-K., Deverell, E., Wagnsson, C. & Hellman, M. (2016). EU, armed forces and social media: convergence or divergence?. Defence Studies, 16(2), 97-117
Open this publication in new window or tab >>EU, armed forces and social media: convergence or divergence?
2016 (English)In: Defence Studies, ISSN 1470-2436, E-ISSN 1743-9698, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 97-117Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article explores how armed forces in EU member states work with and view social media in national and international settings, and what the patterns of convergence/divergence are on these issues. To that end, a questionnaire targeted at EU armed forces was constructed. An index of qualitative variation was calculated to explore the relative convergence among respondents (n = 25) on issues of risks and opportunities with using social media nationally and internationally. Consistent with previous research on European armed forces, we found higher levels of divergence than convergence. Contrary to our expectations that similar challenges, joint international standards, and membership in international organizations would foster convergence with regard to social media use in areas of deployment, we found that convergence appeared foremost pertaining to the domestic level. Policy divergence was strongest in areas of deployment.

National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot strategi och säkerhetspolitik; Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot krishantering och internationell samverkan
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-6280 (URN)10.1080/14702436.2016.1155412 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-08-23 Created: 2016-08-23 Last updated: 2019-11-06Bibliographically approved
Hellman, M., Olsson, E.-K. & Wagnsson, C. (2016). EU Armed Forces’ use of social media in areas of deployment. Media and Communication, 4(1), 51-62
Open this publication in new window or tab >>EU Armed Forces’ use of social media in areas of deployment
2016 (English)In: Media and Communication, ISSN 2083-5701, E-ISSN 2183-2439, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 51-62Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The advent of social media can be seen both as a risk and an opportunity by armed forces. Previous research has primarily examined whether or not the use of social media endangers or strengthens armed forces’ strategic narrative. We examine armed forces’ perceptions of risks and opportunities on a broad basis, with a particular focus on areas of deployment. The article is based on a survey of perceptions of social media amongst the armed forces of EU member states, thus adding to previous research through its comparative perspective. Whereas previous research has mainly focused on larger powers, such as the US and the UK, this article includes the views of the armed forces of 26 EU states, including several smaller nations. In analyzing the results we asked whether or not risk and opportunity perceptions were related to national ICT maturity and the existence of a social media strategy. The analysis shows that perceptions of opportunities outweigh perceptions of risks, with marketing and two-way communication as the two most prominent opportunities offered by the use of social media. Also, armed forces in countries with a moderate to high ICT maturity emphasize social media as a good way for marketing purposes.

Keywords
armed forces, EU, international deployments, social media
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot strategi och säkerhetspolitik; Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot krishantering och internationell samverkan
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-6278 (URN)10.17645/mac.v4i1.336 (DOI)000408561300006000408561300006 ()
Available from: 2016-08-23 Created: 2016-08-23 Last updated: 2018-06-29Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, M. & Olsson, E.-K. (2016). Facebook and Twitter in Crisis Communication: A Comparative Study of Crisis Communication Professionals and Citizens. Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, 24(4), 198-208
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Facebook and Twitter in Crisis Communication: A Comparative Study of Crisis Communication Professionals and Citizens
2016 (English)In: Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, ISSN 0966-0879, E-ISSN 1468-5973, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 198-208Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This mixed-methods study presents a comparative analysis of the use and perceived usefulness of Facebook and Twitter, among Swedish citizens and crisis communication professionals, as crisis communication tools and information sources. The use and perceived usefulness of Facebook and Twitter are not congruent and consistent between the two different groups, according to the overall study. Communication professionals, for example, report higher levels of perceived usefulness regarding Facebook’s potential as a crisis communication tool than do the citizens. Taken together, the results show that researchers (within social media and crisis communication) and crisis managers both need to deal with the fact that social media is not a homogenous phenomenon with a single coherent role in crisis management and communication research and practice.

Keywords
social media, information form, disaster, responses, model
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot krishantering och internationell samverkan
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-6447 (URN)10.1111/1468-5973.12116 (DOI)000387793600001 ()
Funder
Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency
Available from: 2017-01-04 Created: 2017-01-04 Last updated: 2018-07-23Bibliographically approved
Olsson, E.-K. & Eriksson, M. (2016). The logic of public organizations' social media use: toward a theory of 'social mediatization'. Public Relations Inquiry, 5(2), 187-204
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The logic of public organizations' social media use: toward a theory of 'social mediatization'
2016 (English)In: Public Relations Inquiry, ISSN 2046-147X, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 187-204Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study aims to explore government agencies’ social media use. Inspired by the notion of mediatization, we ask whether it is possible to find traces of a corresponding emerging social media logic with the propensity to challenge established organizational practices and processes. In doing so, we use a modified framework originally developed by Van Dijck and Poell which identifies key three characteristics of social media logics: programmability, popularity, and connectivity. We conducted a qualitative interview study using an abductive and hermeneutist-inspired methodology. The empirical material consists of 21 interviews with representatives of Swedish government agencies. The findings reveal patterns across the organizations studied which can be understood as an emerging social media logic. Regarding connectivity, the social media logic causes agencies to spend resources on channels that engage relatively few people who are already favorably disposed toward the agency, despite government agencies’ obligation to communicate with citizens at large. Programmability refers to agencies’ increased communicative and image-building power. Finally, popularity leads agencies to engage in more personalized communication, which includes exposure of individual employees as well as use of informal communicative styles. Taken together, these categories have important ramifications which risk jeopardizing agencies’ legal and normative foundations

National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot krishantering och internationell samverkan
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-6401 (URN)10.1177/2046147X16654454 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-12-19 Created: 2016-12-19 Last updated: 2017-01-16Bibliographically approved
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